wai

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See also: wa'i, wài, wǎi, and wāi

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From why.

Adverb[edit]

wai

  1. (Internet slang) why (a purposeful misspelling)

Conjunction[edit]

wai

  1. (Internet slang) why (a purposeful misspelling)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Thai ไหว้ (wâi, a gesture of thanks)

Noun[edit]

wai (plural wais)

  1. A Thai greeting wherein the palms are brought together in front of the face or chest, sometimes accompanied with a bow.

Anagrams[edit]


Aka-Bea[edit]

Adverb[edit]

wai

  1. indeed

References[edit]

  • Edward Horace Man, A Dictionary of the South Andaman (Aka-Bea) language (1923)

'Are'are[edit]

wai

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Oceanic *waiʀ, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

Noun[edit]

wai

  1. fresh water (clear liquid H₂O)

Antonyms[edit]

  • āsi (salt water)

References[edit]

  • Blust's Austronesian Comparative Dictionary

Arosi[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Oceanic *waiʀ, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

Noun[edit]

wai

  1. water (clear liquid H₂O)

References[edit]

  • Blust's Austronesian Comparative Dictionary

Buli (Indonesia)[edit]

Noun[edit]

wai

  1. water

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Blust's Austronesian Comparative Dictionary

Central Tagbanwa[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Philippine, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

Noun[edit]

wai (Tagbanwa spelling ᝯᝡ)

  1. water (clear liquid H₂O)

Fijian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Oceanic *waiʀ, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

Noun[edit]

wai

  1. water (clear liquid H₂O)

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

wai

  1. Romanization of 𐍅𐌰𐌹

Hano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Oceanic *waiʀ, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

Noun[edit]

wai

  1. water (clear liquid H₂O)

Hawaiian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Eastern Polynesian *wai, from Proto-Nuclear Polynesian *wai, from Proto-Polynesian *wai, from Proto-Oceanic *waiʀ, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wai

  1. fresh water

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • William Churchill, The Polynesian Wanderings: Tracks of the Migration Deduced (1911)

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

wai

  1. rōmaji reading of わい

Kambera[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Central Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

Noun[edit]

wai

  1. water (clear liquid H₂O)

References[edit]

  • Blust's Austronesian Comparative Dictionary

Kapingamarangi[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Nuclear Polynesian *wai, from Proto-Polynesian *wai, from Proto-Oceanic *waiʀ, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

Noun[edit]

wai

  1. water (clear liquid H₂O)

Malay[edit]

wai

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wai

  1. river (large stream which drains a landmass)

Synonyms[edit]


Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

wai

  1. Nonstandard spelling of wāi.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of wǎi.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of wài.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Maori[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Eastern Polynesian *wai, from Proto-Nuclear Polynesian *wai, from Proto-Polynesian *wai, from Proto-Oceanic *waiʀ, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

Noun[edit]

wai

  1. water (clear liquid H₂O)
  2. liquid
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • William Churchill, The Polynesian Wanderings: Tracks of the Migration Deduced (1911)

Etymology 2[edit]

Compare Tahitian vai.

Pronoun[edit]

wai

  1. who?

Masiwang[edit]

Noun[edit]

wai

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Blust's Austronesian Comparative Dictionary

Omba[edit]

Noun[edit]

wai

  1. water

References[edit]

  • William Churchill, The Polynesian Wanderings: Tracks of the Migration Deduced (1911)

Owa[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Oceanic *waiʀ, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

Noun[edit]

wai

  1. water (clear liquid H₂O)

Pitjantjatjara[edit]

Adverb[edit]

wai

  1. hey

Sa'a[edit]

Noun[edit]

wai

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Blust's Austronesian Comparative Dictionary

Sikaiana[edit]

Noun[edit]

wai

  1. water

References[edit]

  • William Churchill, The Polynesian Wanderings: Tracks of the Migration Deduced (1911)

Tae'[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-South Sulawesi *wai, from Proto-Sunda-Sulawesi *wair, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

Noun[edit]

wai

  1. water (clear liquid H₂O)

References[edit]

  • Blust's Austronesian Comparative Dictionary

Tangoa[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Oceanic *waiʀ, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

Noun[edit]

wai

  1. water (clear liquid H₂O)

Torres Strait Creole[edit]

Noun[edit]

wai

  1. (eastern dialect) a coconut embryo

Synonyms[edit]

  • musu (western dialect)

Usage notes[edit]

Wai (eastern dialect) or musu (western dialect) is the first stage of coconut growth. It is followed by giru (eastern dialect) or musu koknat (western dialect).


Viti[edit]

Noun[edit]

wai

  1. water

References[edit]

  • William Churchill, The Polynesian Wanderings: Tracks of the Migration Deduced (1911)