wallow

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Old English wealwian, from Proto-Germanic *walwōną.

Verb[edit]

wallow (third-person singular simple present wallows, present participle wallowing, simple past and past participle wallowed)

  1. (intransitive) To roll oneself about, as in mire; to tumble and roll about; to move lazily or heavily in any medium; to flounder; as, swine wallow in the mire.
    Pigs wallow in the mud.
    • Shakespeare
      I may wallow in the lily beds.
  2. (intransitive) To immerse oneself in, to occupy oneself with, metaphorically.
    She wallowed in her misery.
    • The Simpsons (TV series)
      With Smithers out of the picture I was free to wallow in my own crapulence.
  3. (intransitive) To roll; especially, to roll in anything defiling or unclean, as a hog might do to dust its body to relieve the distress of insect biting or cool its body with mud.
  4. (intransitive) To live in filth or gross vice; to behave in a beastly and unworthy manner.
    • South
      God sees a man wallowing in his native impurity.
  5. (intransitive, UK, Scotland, dialect) To wither; to fade.
Usage notes[edit]

In the sense of “to immerse oneself in, to occupy oneself with”, it is almost exclusively used for self-indulgent negative emotions, particularly self-pity. See synonyms for general or positive alternatives, such as revel.

Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun[edit]

wallow (plural wallows)

  1. An instance of wallowing.
  2. A pool of water or mud in which animals wallow.
  3. A kind of rolling walk.
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

(From inflected forms of) Old English wealġ, from Proto-Germanic *walwo-. Cognate with dialectal Norwegian valg (tasteless). Compare waugh.

Adjective[edit]

wallow (comparative more wallow, superlative most wallow)

  1. (now dialectal) Tasteless, flat.