wallow

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English[edit]

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Old English wealwian, from Proto-Germanic *walwōną.

Verb[edit]

wallow (third-person singular simple present wallows, present participle wallowing, simple past and past participle wallowed)

  1. (intransitive) To roll oneself about, as in mire; to tumble and roll about; to move lazily or heavily in any medium; to flounder; as, swine wallow in the mire.
    Pigs wallow in the mud.
    • Shakespeare
      I may wallow in the lily beds.
  2. (intransitive) To immerse oneself in, to occupy oneself with, metaphorically.
    She wallowed in her misery.
    • The Simpsons (TV series)
      With Smithers out of the picture I was free to wallow in my own crapulence.
  3. (intransitive) To roll; especially, to roll in anything defiling or unclean, as a hog might do to dust its body to relieve the distress of insect biting or cool its body with mud.
  4. (intransitive) To live in filth or gross vice; to behave in a beastly and unworthy manner.
    • South
      God sees a man wallowing in his native impurity.
  5. (intransitive, UK, Scotland, dialect) To wither; to fade.
Usage notes[edit]

In the sense of “to immerse oneself in, to occupy oneself with”, it is almost exclusively used for self-indulgent negative emotions, particularly self-pity. See synonyms for general or positive alternatives, such as revel.

Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun[edit]

wallow (plural wallows)

  1. An instance of wallowing.
  2. A pool of water or mud in which animals wallow.
  3. A kind of rolling walk.
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

(From inflected forms of) Old English wealġ, from Proto-Germanic *walwo-. Cognate with dialectal Norwegian valg (tasteless). Compare waugh.

Adjective[edit]

wallow (comparative more wallow, superlative most wallow)

  1. (now dialectal) Tasteless, flat.