wankle

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English wankel, from Old English wancol (unstable, unsteady, tottering, vacillating, weak), from Proto-Germanic *wankulaz (unsteady, wavering), from Proto-Indo-European *wank-, *wak-, *wek-, *weg- (to be unsteady; crooked). Cognate with Dutch wankel (shaky, unstable), Middle High German wankel (unsteady), German wanken (to waver, totter). See also wonky.

Adjective[edit]

wankle (comparative more wankle, superlative most wankle)

  1. (UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Weak; unstable; unreliable; not to be depended on.

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English wankel, wankill, from Old English wancol (unsteady, skaky). More at wonky.

Adjective[edit]

wankle (comparative mair wankle, superlative maist wankle)

  1. weak
  2. unsteady
    Your wankle leggs canno support ye / Sae sit ye down, till I exhort ye. ― G. Stuart.