weder

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Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wiþr- (against), from Proto-Indo-European *wi-tero- (more apart); from Proto-Indo-European *wi (separation). Cognate with German wider (against) and wieder (again), Danish ved (by, near, with), Swedish vid (by, next to, with).

Alternative forms[edit]

Alternative form of weer ('again').

Adverb[edit]

weder

  1. (dated) Alternative form of weer ('again').
Derived terms[edit]

generally parallel to a weer- equivalent

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Dutch *wedar, from Proto-Germanic *wedrą.

Alternative forms[edit]

Alternative form of weer ('weather').

Noun[edit]

weder n (uncountable, diminutive wedertje n)

  1. (dated) Alternative form of weer ('weather').

Etymology 3[edit]

Ultimately from Proto-Germanic *weþruz (wether), from Proto-Indo-European *wet- (year). Cognate with English wether, Scots weddir, woddir, wadder (wether), German Widder (wether, ram), Swedish vädur (wether, ram), Icelandic veður (wether, ram), Latin vitulus (calf).

Alternative forms[edit]

Alternative form of weer (castrated ram; 'wether').

Noun[edit]

weder m (plural weders, diminutive wedertje n)

  1. (archaic) Alternative form of weer (castrated ram; 'wether').
Synonyms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German wedar, from Proto-Germanic *hwaþeraz.

Conjunction[edit]

weder

  1. neither
    weder Himmel noch Hölle — neither heaven nor hell

External links[edit]


Luxembourgish[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

weder

  1. neither
    • Luxembourgish translation of Matthew 5:34:
      Ech awer soen iech: Schwiert iwwerhaapt net - weder beim Himmel, well dat ass dem Herrgott säin Troun
      But I say to you: Do not swear at all - neither by Heaven, for that is the throne of God

Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English weder.

Noun[edit]

weder

  1. weather
  2. bad weather

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wedrą, from Proto-Indo-European *wedʰrom. Cognate with Old Frisian weder (West Frisian waar), Old Saxon wedar (Low German Weder), Dutch weder, Old High German wetar (German Wetter), Old Norse veðr (Swedish väder, Danish vejr); and more distantly with Russian ведро (vedro).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

weder n

  1. sky
  2. weather, breeze
  3. season

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]