weld

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English[edit]

A person welding.

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English welde, wolde, from Proto-Germanic *walþō (compare Dutch wouw, Middle Low German walde, wolde, gaude in French), from Proto-Germanic *walþuz (forest). More at wold.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

weld (plural welds)

  1. A herb (Reseda luteola) related to mignonette, growing in Europe, and to some extent in America, used to make a yellow dye; dyer's broom; dyer's rocket; dyer's weed; wild woad.
  2. The yellow coloring matter or dye extracted from this plant.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Alteration of well (boil, rise), probably influenced by the past participle, welled

Verb[edit]

weld (third-person singular simple present welds, present participle welding, simple past and past participle welded)

  1. (transitive) To bind together inseparably; to unite closely or intimately.
    • 1847: Alfred Lord Tennyson, The Princess
      Now should men see / Two women faster welded in one love / Than pairs of wedlock.
  2. (transitive) To join two materials (especially two metals) together by applying heat, pressure and filler, either separately or in any combination.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

weld (plural welds)

  1. The state of being welded.
  2. The joint made by welding.
Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology.

Verb[edit]

weld (third-person singular simple present welds, present participle welding, simple past and past participle welded)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To wield.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Verb[edit]

weld

  1. Mutated form of gweld (to see).

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
gweld weld ngweld unchanged