whistle

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English whistlen; Old English hwistlan, from Proto-Germanic *hwistlōną.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

whistle (plural whistles)

  1. A device designed to be placed in the mouth in order, or driven by steam or otherwise, to make a whistling sound.
  2. An act of whistling.
  3. A shrill, high-pitched sound made by whistling.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 5, The Celebrity:
      We expressed our readiness, and in ten minutes were in the station wagon, rolling rapidly down the long drive, for it was then after nine. [] As we reached the lodge we heard the whistle, and we backed up against one side of the platform as the train pulled up at the other.
  4. Any high-pitched sound similar to the sound made by whistling.
    the whistle of the wind in the trees
  5. (Cockney rhyming slang) A suit (from whistle and flute).
    • 2005, Wally Payne, A Minority of One: A Monkey's Tale Continued
      We soldiers changed into our No.1 dress uniforms, Sid into his best whistle and we set off for the church.
  6. The mouth and throat; so called as being the organs of whistling.
    • Walton
      Let's drink the other cup to wet our whistles.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

whistle (third-person singular simple present whistles, present participle whistling, simple past and past participle whistled)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To make a shrill, high-pitched sound by forcing air through the mouth. To produce a whistling sound, restrictions to the flow of air are created using the teeth, tongue and lips.
    Never whistle at a funeral.
    She was whistling a happy tune.
  2. (intransitive) To move in such a way as to create a whistling sound.
    A bullet whistled past.
  3. (transitive) To send, signal, or call by a whistle.
    • Addison
      He chanced to miss his dog; we stood still till he had whistled him up.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See also[edit]