wis

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See also: -wis and Wis.

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English wis (certain, sure), from an aphetic form of Middle English iwis, ywis (certain, sure) (from Old English ġewiss (certain, sure)), or of North Germanic origin, akin to Icelandic viss (certain). More at ywis.

Adverb[edit]

wis (comparative more wis, superlative most wis)

  1. (rare, obsolete or dialectal) Certainly, surely
    • 1884, Charlotte Mary Yonge, The armourer's prentices:
      So I wis would the Dragon under him [...]
  2. (rare, obsolete or dialectal) Really, truly
  3. (rare, obsolete or dialectal) Indeed
    "As wis God helpe me." --Chaucer.

Adjective[edit]

wis (comparative more wis, superlative most wis)

  1. (rare, obsolete or dialectal) Certain
  2. (rare, obsolete or dialectal) Sure
    He was wis on his word
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From an incorrect division, mistaking iwis (certain) for I wis (I know). See ywis for more information. The German verb wissen appears similar, but in fact corresponds etymologically to the English verb wit; both of those verbs are only indirectly related to this one.

Verb[edit]

wis (third-person singular simple present wis, present participle -, simple past -, past participle wist or wissed)

  1. (obsolete or archaic) To know.
  2. (obsolete or archaic) To think, suppose.
    "Howe'er you wis." --R. Browning.
  3. (obsolete or archaic) To imagine, ween; to deem.
    Nor do I know how long it is (For I have lain entranced, I wis). --Coleridge.

Afrikaans[edit]

Verb[edit]

wis

  1. preterite of weet; knew

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

wis (not comparable)

  1. sure, certain
    een wisse dood — a certain death

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

wis f, m (plural wissen, diminutive wisje n)

  1. twig
  2. bundle, bunch
  3. short for wisdoek (dishcloth)

Verb[edit]

wis

  1. first-person singular present indicative of wissen
  2. imperative of wissen

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

wis

  1. Romanization of 𐍅𐌹𐍃

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wīsaz, from Proto-Indo-European *weydstos (knowledgeable), an extension of Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (to see, to know). Akin to Old English wīs, Old High German wīs and Old Norse víss.

Adjective[edit]

wīs

  1. wise

Declension[edit]


Descendants[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wīsaz, from Proto-Indo-European *weydstos (knowledgeable), an extension of Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (to see, to know). Akin to Old High German wīs and Old Norse víss.

Adjective[edit]

wīs

  1. wise

Declension[edit]

Weak Strong
singular plural singular plural
m n f m n f m n f
nominative wīsa wīse wīse wīsan nom. wīs wīse wīs wīsa, -e
accusative wīsan wīse wīsan acc. wīsne wīs wīse wīse wīs wīsa, -e
genitive wīsan wīsra, wīsena gen. wīses wīses wīsre wīsra
dative wīsan wīsum dat. wīsum wīsum wīsre wīsum
instrumental wīse


Descendants[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wīsaz, from Proto-Indo-European *weydstos (knowledgeable), an extension of Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (to see, to know). Akin to Old English wīs and Old Norse víss.

Adjective[edit]

wīs

  1. wise

Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wīsaz, from Proto-Indo-European *weydstos (knowledgeable), an extension of Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (to see, to know). Akin to Old English wīs, Old High German wīs and Old Norse víss.

Adjective[edit]

wīs

  1. wise

Declension[edit]



Scots[edit]

Verb[edit]

wis

  1. simple past tense of be

Usage notes[edit]

Use wis with singular pronouns & plural nouns, otherwise use wis or wir with plural pronouns.

See also[edit]