æt

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse ætt, átt (family, race, direction), from Proto-Germanic *aihtiz (possession, property), cognate with Old English ǣht, Old High German ēht, and Gothic 𐌰𐌹𐌷𐍄𐍃 (aihts). Derived from the verb Proto-Germanic *aiganą (to possess).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

æt c (singular definite ætten, plural indefinite ætter)

  1. (dated) family, descent
  2. (dated) class (group of persons with similar ethnic or social characteristics)

Inflection[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

æt

  1. first/second/third-person singular past of eita

Conjugation[edit]

Conjugation of eita (irregular)
infinitive eita
supine (h)itið
participle eitandi (h)itin
present past
first singular eiti (h)æt
second singular eitur (h)æt/(h)ætst
third singular eitur (h)æt
plural eita (h)itu
imperative
singular eit!
plural eitið!

Icelandic[edit]

Adjective[edit]

æt

  1. feminine singular indefinite nominative of ætur (edible)
  2. neuter plural indefinite nominative/accusative of ætur (edible)

Verb[edit]

æt

  1. second-person singular active imperative of æta

Old English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *ētą. Related to etan.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ǣt m

  1. eating

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *at

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

æt

  1. (+dative) at a certain place
    æt hām
    at home (with irregular apocope of dative -e)
  2. (+dative) at a certain time
    æt fruman
    in the beginning, at first
    æt þām ȳtemestan dæġe
    at the last day
  3. (+accusative, rarely) to, up to, as far as
  4. (+dative) from
    Hwā is wīs? Sē þe leornaþ æt ǣlcum menn.
    Who is wise? He who learns from everyone.
    • 10th century, Ælfric, "On the Greater Litany"
      Māre selþ se þearfa þām rīċan þonne hē æt him nime.
      The poor give more to the rich than they take from them.
    • 9th century, The Blickling Homilies, "Ascension Thursday"
      Hīe ġehīerdon his lāre and his word æt his selfes mūðe.
      They heard his teachings and his words from his own mouth.
Descendants[edit]
  • Middle English: at, et, ed
    • English: at
    • Scots: at
    • Yola: adh

Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse ætt, from Proto-Germanic *aihtiz.

Noun[edit]

æt f

  1. family, kin, bloodline

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]