विना

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: वन and बिना

Hindi[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Learned borrowing from Sanskrit विना (vínā). Doublet of बिना (binā).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Delhi Hindi) IPA(key): /ʋɪ.nɑː/, [ʋɪ.n̪äː]

Particle[edit]

विना (vinā) (Urdu spelling وِنَا‎)

  1. (rare, formal) without, lacking
    Synonyms: बग़ैर (baġair), बिना (binā)

References[edit]

  • Syamasundara Dasa (1965–1975) , “विना”, in Hindi Sabdasagara [Comprehensive Hindi Dictionary] (in Hindi), Kashi [Varanasi]: Nagari Pracarini Sabha.

Sanskrit[edit]

Alternative scripts[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From वि- (ví-) +‎, plus an uncertain second element which has been theorized to be a fossilized Proto-Indo-European ablative suffix *-neh₁, related to Proto-Germanic *-nē (cf. *-anē, *fanē) and perhaps Latin *-nē in supernē. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Pronunciation[edit]

Postposition[edit]

विना (vínā)

  1. without, except [+accusative instrumental ablative]
    त्वां विना न गमिष्यामि।
    tvāṃ vinā na gamiṣyāmi.
    I will not go without you.

Usage notes[edit]

The word preceding विना (vinā) is usually inflected in instrumental case. For example, त्वया विना (without you), मया विना (without me), etc. However, at times depending on the context, that word can be inflected in accusative or ablative case too.

Descendants[edit]

Borrowed terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Monier Williams (1899) , “विना”, in A Sanskrit–English Dictionary, [], new edition, Oxford: At the Clarendon Press, OCLC 458052227, page 969.
  • वि॑ना” in Carl Cappeller, A Sanskrit–English Dictionary: Based upon the St. Petersburg Lexicons, Strasbourg: Karl J. Trübner, 1891, →OCLC, page 498.
  • Mayrhofer, Manfred (1996) , “vínā”, in Etymologisches Wörterbuch des Altindoarischen [Etymological Dictionary of Old Indo-Aryan] (in German), volume II, Heidelberg: Carl Winter Universitätsverlag, page 557
  • Turner, Ralph Lilley (1969–1985) , “vínā (11772)”, in A Comparative Dictionary of the Indo-Aryan Languages, London: Oxford University Press