𒉿𒀀𒋻

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Hittite[edit]

𒉿𒀀𒋻
The cuneiform characters Unicode displays by default do not accurately represent the original script. To view the correct characters install the correct fonts at www.hethport.uni-wuerzburg.de.

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *wódr̥ (water). Bedřich Hrozný, who deciphered Hittite in 1917, said that seing this word and knowing German Wasser made him realize Hittite was Indo-European.[1]

Noun[edit]

𒉿𒀀𒋻 (wa-a-tar)

  1. water
    • Said to be the first Hittite sentence translated by Hrozný:
      (please add the primary text of this quote)
      nu NINDA-an e-ez-za-at-te-ni wa-a-tar-ma e-ku-ut-te-ni.
      [now] bread you shall eat, and water you shall drink.

Inflection[edit]

Phonemic transcription (IPA)
Neuter gender Singular Plural
absolutive /ˈwaːtr̩/ /wɨˈtaːr/
ergative /wɨˈtɛnant͡s/ /wɨˈtɛnantes/
genitive /wɨˈtɛnas/ /wɨˈtɛnas/
dative-locative /wɨˈtɛni/ /wɨˈtɛnas/
allative /wɨˈtɛna/
ablative /wɨˈtɛnat͡s/ /wɨˈtɛnat͡s/
instrumental /wɨˈtantː/ /wɨˈtantː/
The IPA values given in this table are reconstructed.
Broad transcription
Neuter gender Singular Plural
absolutive wātar witār
ergative witenanz(a) witenanteš
genitive witenaš witenan, witenaš
dative-locative witēni witenaš
allative witena
ablative witenaz(a) witenaz(a)
instrumental witant witant
Transliteration
Neuter gender Singular Plural
absolutive wa-a-tar ú-i-ta-a-ar
ergative ú-i-te-na-an-za ú-i-te-na-an-te-eš
genitive ú-i-te-na-aš ú-i-te-na-aš
dative-locative ú-i-te-e-ni ú-i-te-na-aš
allative ú-i-te-na
ablative ú-i-te-na-az ú-i-te-na-az
instrumental ú-i-ta-an-ta, ú-i-te-na-it ú-i-ta-an-ta, ú-i-te-na-it
The stems ú-e-te-n- and ú-i-de-n- are also attested.
Cuneiform
Neuter gender Singular Plural
absolutive 𒉿𒀀𒋻 𒌑𒄿𒋫𒀀𒅈
ergative 𒌑𒄿𒋼𒈾𒀭𒍝, 𒌑𒄿𒋼𒈾𒀭𒊍 𒌑𒄿𒋼𒈾𒀭𒋼𒌍
genitive 𒌑𒄿𒋼𒈾𒀸 𒌑𒄿𒋼𒈾𒀸
dative-locative 𒌑𒄿𒋼𒂊𒉌 𒌑𒄿𒋼𒈾𒀸
allative 𒌑𒄿𒋼𒈾𒀀
ablative 𒌑𒄿𒋼𒈾𒊍, 𒌑𒄿𒋼𒈾𒀀𒍝 𒌑𒄿𒋼𒈾𒊍, 𒌑𒄿𒋼𒈾𒀀𒍝
instrumental 𒌑𒄿𒋫𒀭𒋫, 𒌑𒄿𒋼𒈾𒀉 𒌑𒄿𒋫𒀭𒋫, 𒌑𒄿𒋼𒈾𒀉

References[edit]

  1. ^ Buck, C. D. (1920), “Hittite an Indo-European Language?”, in Classical Philology[1], volume 15, issue 2, pages 189–90