-let

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See also: let, Let, lét, lèt, lêt, and łęt

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English -let, -elet, from Old French -elet, a double diminutive from Old French -el + et.

Suffix[edit]

-let

  1. a diminutive suffix; for example:
  2. piece; as in a suit of armor for example:

Derived terms[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

Alongside -ie / -y, -ling, and -ette, -let is one of the three most productive diminutive affixes in modern English. It is used almost exclusively with concrete nouns and (unusually for a diminutive) never with names. When used with objects, it generally denotes diminution only in size; when used with animals, it generally denotes young animals; when used with adult persons, it is generally depreciative, connoting pettiness and conveying contempt. When used to describe parts in a suit of armor and some other contexts it denotes a piece or component of the larger whole.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

-l +‎ -et, created during the Hungarian language reform, which took place in the 18th–19th centuries. The neologists popularized it based on verbs ending in -l and further derived with -at/-et. [1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-let

  1. (noun-forming suffix) Added to different parts of speech to form a noun.
    rész (part)részlet (detail)
    keres (to search)kereslet (demand (in economics))
    egy (one)egylet (society, association, club)

Usage notes[edit]

  • (noun-forming suffix) Harmonic variants:
    -lat is added to a back vowel word
    -let is added to a front vowel word

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ -let in Zaicz, Gábor (ed.). Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (’Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN.  (See also its 2nd edition.)