-on

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

  • (Physics) From -on in electron, reinforced by Ancient Greek -ον (-on) ending neuter nouns and adjectives.
  • (Chemistry) From -on in carbon, first applied to boron and then to silicon.

Suffix[edit]

-on

  1. (physics, mathematics and biology) Forming nouns denoting subatomic particles (proton), quanta (photon), molecular units (codon), or substances (interferon).
  2. (biology, genetics) Forming names of things considered as basic or fundamental units, such as codon or recon.
  3. (chemistry) Forming names of noble gases and certain nonmetal elements (such as boron or silicon).

Derived terms[edit]


Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Cebuano[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • -hon (after vowels without glottal stops).

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Philippine *ən, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *ən, from Proto-Austronesian *ən (see Ilocano -en and Tagalog -in).

Suffix[edit]

-on

  1. Used to form nouns indicating objects, persons or action expressed by the root.
  2. Demonym-forming suffix.
  3. Object trigger verb suffix.

Derived terms[edit]



Danish[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-on

  1. (organic chemistry) -one

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɔn/
  • (file)

Suffix[edit]

-on

  1. (organic chemistry) -one
  2. (particles) -on

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Related terms[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-on

  1. Suffix variant for the illative singular, see -Vn.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French -on, a blending of Latin -ōnem (accusative singular of , masculine appellative suffix), Frankish *-an (accusative of *-ō, ending of masculine weak declension nouns), Frankish *-in (diminutive suffix), and *-ing (diminutive suffix for animals, via -enc, -enz). Some also descend from the Celtic singulative *-onos, such as mouton.

Suffix[edit]

-on

  1. Forming diminutives of things, including some animals.
    chat (cat) + ‎-on → ‎chaton (kitten)
    ours (bear) + ‎-on → ‎ourson (cub)
  2. Indicating origin or occupation.
    marmite (cooking pot) + ‎-on → ‎marmiton (chef's assistant)
    quartier (quarter) + ‎-on → ‎quarteron (quarter of a pound)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Ancient Greek -ον (-on), neuter of -ος (-os), masculine adjective ending.

Suffix[edit]

-on

  1. (physics and biology) -on
Derived terms[edit]



Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

-on

  1. Romanization of -𐍉𐌽

Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-on

  1. (case suffix) on. Used to form the superessive case.
    asztal (table)az asztalon (on the table)
  2. (verb-forming suffix, chiefly archaic or dialectal) Indefinite third-person singular suffix (currently only in the imperative mood as part of -jon, formerly also occurring in the indicative).
    vagyon (he/she/it is, there is) (in the standard language: van)

Usage notes[edit]

  • (case suffix) Harmonic variants:
    -n is added to words ending in a vowel. Final -a changes to -á-. Final -e changes to -é-.
    -on is added to back-vowel words ending in a consonant
    -en is added to unrounded front-vowel words ending in a consonant
    -ön is added to rounded front-vowel words ending in a consonant
  • (verb-forming suffix) Harmonic variants:
    -on is added to some back-vowel words
    -an is added to back-vowel words
    -en is added to front-vowel words

See also[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *-ōną

Suffix[edit]

-on

  1. (verbal suffix) used to form the infinitive of class 2 weak verbs (an alternative ending -oian is sometimes found instead of -on)
    makon "to make"
    haton "to hate"

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Low German: -en
    • Low German: -en

Spanish[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-on

  1. Obsolete spelling of -ón

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Most likely originally from nypon (rosehip) and smultron (wild strawberry) and then extended to other borrowed words with an original -a. Probably originally a plural suffix cognate to Gothic -𐍉𐌽𐌰 (-ōna) in e.g. 𐌰𐌿𐌲𐍉𐌽𐌰 (augōna, eyes), compare Swedish ögon.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-on n

  1. Used in many names of berries and some fruits

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ -on in Elof Hellquist, Svensk etymologisk ordbok (1st ed., 1922)

Anagrams[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-on

  1. Pluralisation suffix
    meddyg (doctor) + ‎-on → ‎meddygon (doctors)
    lleidr (thief) + ‎-on → ‎lladron (lladron)
    athro ((male) teacher) + ‎-on → ‎athrawon (athrawon)
    Synonyms: -aid, -aint, -au, -ed, -edd, -en, -i, -iaid, -iau, -ion, -od, -oedd, -ydd, -yr, -ys

Etymology 2[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-on

  1. (colloquial) verb suffix for the first-person plural preterite
  2. (colloquial) verb suffix for the third-person plural preterite

Derived terms[edit]