trap: difference between revisions

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(Partial undo revision 18928520 by -sche (talk) - The sense "transsexual" or "transvestite" is common and easily verified. I believe only the part implying "sexual relations, believing..." was in doubt.)
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# {{slang}} Short for [[trapezius]] muscle in [[bodybuilding]]
 
# {{slang}} Short for [[trapezius]] muscle in [[bodybuilding]]
 
# {{sports}} Short for [[trapshooting]].
 
# {{sports}} Short for [[trapshooting]].
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# {{slang|pejorative}} A female [[crossdresser]], [[transvestite]] or [[transsexual]].
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#: ''I saw your brother asking a '''trap''' out last night at the bar.''
 
# {{computing}} An [[exception]] generated by the [[processor]].
 
# {{computing}} An [[exception]] generated by the [[processor]].
 
# {{Australia|slang|historical}} A mining [[license]] [[inspector]] during the Australian [[gold rush]].
 
# {{Australia|slang|historical}} A mining [[license]] [[inspector]] during the Australian [[gold rush]].
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{{trans-see|trap shooting|trapshooting}}
 
{{trans-see|trap shooting|trapshooting}}
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{{trans-top|slang: transvestite}}
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* Finnish: {{t|fi|ansa}}, {{t|fi|transu}}
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{{trans-mid}}
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{{trans-bottom}}
   
 
{{checktrans-top}}
 
{{checktrans-top}}

Revision as of 19:58, 2 December 2012

English

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Leghold trap

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Middle English trappe, from Old English træppe, treppe (trap, snare) (also in betræppan (to trap)) from Proto-Germanic *trap-. Akin to Old High German trappa, trapa (trap, snare), Middle Dutch trappe (trap, snare), Middle Low German treppe (step, stair) (German Treppe "step, stair"), Old English treppan (to step, tread). Connection to "step" is "that upon which one steps". French trappe and Spanish trampa are ultimately borrowings from Germanic.

Noun

trap (plural traps)

  1. A machine or other device designed to catch (and sometimes kill) animals, either by holding them in a container, or by catching hold of part of the body.
    I put down some traps in my apartment to try and deal with the mouse problem.
  2. A trick or arrangement designed to catch someone in a more general sense.
    Unfortunately she fell into the trap of confusing biology with destiny.
  3. A covering over a hole or opening; a trapdoor.
    Close the trap, would you, before someone falls and breaks their neck.
  4. A wooden instrument shaped somewhat like a shoe, used in the game of trapball; the game of trapball itself.
  5. Any device used to hold and suddenly release an object.
    They shot out of the school gates like greyhounds out of the trap.
  6. A bend, sag, or other device in a waste-pipe arranged so that the liquid contents form a seal which prevents the escape of noxious gases, but permits the flow of liquids.
  7. A place in a water pipe, pump, etc., where air accumulates for want of an outlet.
  8. Template:historical A light two-wheeled carriage with springs.
  9. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) A kind of movable stepladder.
  10. Template:slang A person's mouth.
    Keep your trap shut.
  11. (plural) belongings
    • 1870, Mark Twain, Running for Governor,
      ...his cabin-mates in Montana losing small valuables from time to time, until at last, these things having been invariably found on Mr. Twain's person or in his "trunk" (newspaper he rolled his traps in)...
  12. Template:slang Short for trapezius muscle in bodybuilding
  13. Template:sports Short for trapshooting.
  14. Template:slang A female crossdresser, transvestite or transsexual.
    I saw your brother asking a trap out last night at the bar.
  15. Template:computing An exception generated by the processor.
  16. Module error A mining license inspector during the Australian gold rush.
    • 1996, Judith Kapferer, Being All Equal: Identity, Difference and Australian Cultural Practice, page 84,
      The miners′ grievances centred on the issue of the compulsory purchase of miners′ licences and the harassment of raids by the licensing police, the ‘traps,’ in search of unlicensed miners.
    • 2006, Helen Calvert, Jenny Herbst, Ross Smith, Australia and the World: Thinking Historically, page 55,
      Diggers were angered by frequent licence inspections and harassment by ‘the traps’ (the goldfield police).
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb

trap (third-person singular simple present traps, present participle trapping, simple past and past participle trapped)

  1. Template:transitive To catch in a trap or traps; as, to trap foxes.
  2. Template:transitive To ensnare; to take by stratagem; to entrap.
  3. Template:transitive To provide with a trap; as, to trap a drain; to trap a sewer pipe.
  4. Template:intransitive To set traps for game; to make a business of trapping game; as, to trap for beaver.
  5. Template:intransitive To leave suddenly, to flee.
  6. Template:computing Template:intransitive To capture (e.g. an error) in order to handle or process it.
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Related terms

Etymology 2

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

From Swedish trapp, from trappa (stair).

Noun

trap (uncountable)

  1. A dark coloured igneous rock, now used to designate any non-volcanic, non-granitic igneous rock; trap rock.
Derived terms

Anagrams


Dutch

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch trappe, from Old Dutch *trappa, from Proto-Germanic *trappō, *trappōn.

Noun

trap m (plural trappen, diminutive trapje n)

  1. stairs, staircase
  2. ladder
  3. degree, grade
  4. kick (act of kicking)
Derived terms
Descendants

Verb

trap

  1. trap
  2. trap

Etymology 2

From German Trappe, from Polish drop or Czech drop.

Noun

trap f (plural trappen, diminutive trapje n)

  1. bustard

Anagrams


Finnish

Etymology

From English

Pronunciation

Noun

trap

  1. trapshooting, trap (type of shooting sport)

Declension

Pronunciation /ˈt̪rɑp/:

Pronunciation /ˈt̪ræp/:

See also