fight: difference between revisions

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|chapter=18|url=http://openlibrary.org/works/OL2004261W
 
|chapter=18|url=http://openlibrary.org/works/OL2004261W
 
|passage=‘Then the father has a great '''fight''' with his terrible conscience,’ said Munday with granite seriousness. ‘Should he make a row with the police […]? Or should he say nothing about it and condone brutality for fear of appearing in the newspapers?}}
 
|passage=‘Then the father has a great '''fight''' with his terrible conscience,’ said Munday with granite seriousness. ‘Should he make a row with the police […]? Or should he say nothing about it and condone brutality for fear of appearing in the newspapers?}}
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#*{{quote-magazine|date=2013-08-10|volume=408|issue=8848|magazine={{w|The Economist}}
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|title=[http://www.economist.com/news/leaders/21583277-worlds-biggest-polluter-going-green-it-needs-speed-up-transition-can-china21583270-new-zealands-plan-regulate-designer-drugs-better-trying-ban-them-and-failing-new A new prescription]
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|passage=As the world's drug habit shows, governments are failing in their quest to monitor every London window-box and Andean hillside for banned plants. But even that Sisyphean task looks easy next to the '''fight''' against synthetic drugs.}}
 
#: {{usex|I'll put up a '''fight''' to save this company.|lang=en}}
 
#: {{usex|I'll put up a '''fight''' to save this company.|lang=en}}
 
# The [[will]] or [[ability]] to fight.
 
# The [[will]] or [[ability]] to fight.
#: {{usex|As soon as he saw the size of his opponent, all the '''fight''' went out of him.|lang=en}}
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#: {{usex|That little guy has a bit of '''fight''' in him after all.   As soon as he saw the size of his opponent, all the '''fight''' went out of him.|lang=en}}
#: {{usex|That little guy have a little '''fight''' inside him after all.|lang=en}}
 
   
 
=====Synonyms=====
 
=====Synonyms=====

Revision as of 21:54, 27 September 2013

English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle English fighten, from Old English feohtan ‎(to fight, combat, strive), from Proto-Germanic Template:term/t, from Proto-Indo-European Template:term/t. Cognate with Scots fecht ‎(to fight), West Frisian fjochtsje, fjuchte ‎(to fight), Dutch vechten ‎(to fight), Low German fechten ‎(to fight), German fechten ‎(to fight, fence), Latin pectō ‎(comb, thrash, verb), Albanian pjek ‎(to hit, strive, fight), Ancient Greek πέκω ‎(pékō, comb or card wool, verb). Related also to Old English feht ‎(wool, shaggy pelt, fleece).

Verb

fight ‎(third-person singular simple present fights, present participle fighting, simple past fought, past participle fought or (archaic) foughten)

  1. (intransitive) To contend in physical conflict, either singly or in war, battle etc.
    The two boxers have been fighting for more than half an hour.
    A wounded animal will fight like a maniac.
  2. (intransitive) To strive for; to campaign or contend for success.
    He fought for the Democrats in the last election.
  3. (transitive) To conduct or engage in (battle, warfare etc.).
    The battle was fought just over that hill.
    • Macaulay
      He had to fight his way through the world.
    • Bible, 2 Timothy iv. 7
      I have fought a good fight.
  4. (transitive) To engage in combat with; to oppose physically, to contest with.
    My grandfather fought the Nazis in World War II.
  5. (transitive) To try to overpower; to fiercely counteract.
    The government pledged to fight corruption.
  6. (transitive, archaic) To cause to fight; to manage or manoeuvre in a fight.
    to fight cocks; to fight one's ship
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2

From Old English feoht, from the verb. Corresponding to Dutch gevecht, German Gefecht.

Noun

fight ‎(plural fights)

  1. An occasion of fighting.
    One of them got stabbed to death during the fight.
  2. (archaic) A battle between opposing armies.
  3. A physical confrontation or combat between two or more people or groups.
    Watch your language, are you looking for a fight?
  4. (sports) A boxing or martial arts match.
    I'm going to Nick’s to watch the big fight tomorrow night.
  5. A conflict, possibly nonphysical, with opposing ideas or forces; strife.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 18, in The China Governess[1]:
      ‘Then the father has a great fight with his terrible conscience,’ said Munday with granite seriousness. ‘Should he make a row with the police […]? Or should he say nothing about it and condone brutality for fear of appearing in the newspapers?
    • 2013 August 10, “A new prescription”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8848:
      As the world's drug habit shows, governments are failing in their quest to monitor every London window-box and Andean hillside for banned plants. But even that Sisyphean task looks easy next to the fight against synthetic drugs.
    I'll put up a fight to save this company.
  6. The will or ability to fight.
    That little guy has a bit of fight in him after all.   As soon as he saw the size of his opponent, all the fight went out of him.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: per · result · formed · #763: fight · agree · sit · considerable