Agatha

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See also: agatha

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek Ἀγαθή ‎(Agathḗ), from ἀγαθός ‎(agathós, good).

Proper noun[edit]

Agatha

  1. A female given name.
    • 1991 Anne Tyler, Saint Maybe, Penguin Canada (2003), ISBN 0143012436, page 13:
      Agatha was as cloddish as her name - plain and thick, pasty-faced.

Usage notes[edit]

Originally given in honor of a third century Sicilian martyr. In common use in the Middle Ages, mildly revived in the 19th century, but rare today.

Translations[edit]

External links[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: Aga‧tha

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek Ἀγαθή ‎(Agathḗ), from ἀγαθός ‎(agathós, good).

Noun[edit]

Agatha f ‎(uncountable)

  1. Agatha

Derived terms[edit]


German[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Agatha

  1. A female given name, cognate to English Agatha.

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology Scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Agatha f ‎(genitive Agathae); first declension

  1. a city in Gallia Narbonensis, now Agde

Declension[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular
nominative Agatha
genitive Agathae
dative Agathae
accusative Agatham
ablative Agathā
vocative Agatha

References[edit]