Blitz

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See also: blitz

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Shortened from German Blitzkrieg (blitzkrieg, literally lightning war). The Blitz was in truth not a blitzkrieg, which is a rapid ground offensive based on superior tank forces. However, the word was current at the time for the successful German campaigns in Poland and France, and was transferred to the attacks on Britain, perhaps by association of Blitz (lightning) with the bombings.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

the Blitz

  1. (historical) The series of air raids launched on various cities in Great Britain by the German air force in 1940–41 during World War II.
    Synonym: Baedeker raids

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German blitze (lightning), from Old High German blëcchazzen, from Proto-West Germanic *blaik, whence English bleak and bleach.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /blɪts/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

Blitz m (strong, genitive Blitzes, plural Blitze)

  1. (meteorology) a bolt of lightning
    Ein Blitz erhellte die Nacht.
    A bolt of lightning lit the night.
  2. (photography) flash

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Friedrich Kluge (1883), “Blitz”, in John Francis Davis, transl., Etymological Dictionary of the German Language, published 1891