Eck

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See also: eck

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the German Eck.

Proper noun[edit]

Eck (plural Ecks)

  1. A surname from German. — famously held by:
    1. Johann Eck (German scholastic theologian, 1486–1543)

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Statistics[edit]

  • According to the 2010 United States Census, Eck is the 4,618th most common surname in the United States, belonging to 7,681 individuals. Eck is most common among White (95.66%) individuals.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


East Central German[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Eck m

  1. (Erzgebirgisch) a diminutive of the male given name Eckhardt

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • 2020 June 11, Hendrik Heidler, Hendrik Heidler's 400 Seiten: Echtes Erzgebirgisch: Wuu de Hasen Hoosn haaßn un de Hosen Huusn do sei mir drhamm: Das Original Wörterbuch: Ratgeber und Fundgrube der erzgebirgischen Mund- und Lebensart: Erzgebirgisch – Deutsch / Deutsch – Erzgebirgisch[1], 3. geänderte Auflage edition, Norderstedt: BoD – Books on Demand, →ISBN, OCLC 932028867, page 36:

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Variant of Ecke.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɛk/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

Eck n (strong or mixed, genitive Eckes or Ecks, plural (southern Germany) Ecke or (Austria) Ecken)

  1. (Southern German, Austria) Synonym of Ecke f (corner)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Luxembourgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German egga.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Eck m (plural Ecken or Ecker)

  1. corner

Pennsylvania German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Rhine Franconian Eck, from Middle High German egge, from Old High German egga, from Proto-West Germanic *aggju. Compare German Ecke, English edge.

Noun[edit]

Eck n (plural Ecke)

  1. corner
  2. angle
  3. section