God

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See also: god, gód, Gód, göd, gød, goð, and góð

English[edit]

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Michaelangelo: The Creation

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English God. See god.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

God (usually uncountable, plural Gods)

  1. The single deity of various monotheistic religions.
    • c. 1000, Beowulf, l. 930:
      A mæg God wyrcan wunder æfter wundre.
    • 1740, Samuel Richardson, Pamela, Vol. II, p. 388:
      ...God, the All-gracious, the All-good, the All-bountiful, the All-mighty, the All-merciful God...
    • 1911, Katharine Harris Bradley as Michael Field, Accuser, p. 158:
      The Muéddin: God is great, there is no God but God.
    Dawn believes in God, but Willow believes in multiple gods and goddesses.
  2. (Christianity) Short for God the Father, the aspect of the Trinity described in the Old Testament.
  3. (Christianity, chiefly obsolete) Short for God the Son, the aspect of the Trinity incarnated as Jesus Christ.
    • a. 1000, homily recorded in Peter Clemoes's The Anglo-Saxons, p. 274:
      On cyricean wyrð gegæderod cristen folc... to underfonne godes flæsc and godes blod.
    Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death.
  4. The single male deity of various bitheistic or duotheistic religions.
    • 2001, Timothy Freke and Peter Gandy, Jesus and the Lost Goddess, page 133:
      The ancients represented this fundamental duality mythologically as God and Goddess. When Mystery looks at itself, God looks at Goddess.
    • 2005, Nikki Bado-Fralick, Coming to the Edge of the Circle, page 45:
      This reduces the successful invocation of God to a function of the presence of male genitalia. Put another way, women have the wrong equipment to invoke God.
      Goddess and God flow throughout all of nature, through each and every man and woman, becoming fully present in the world.
    • 2006, Ronald L. Clark, The Grace of Being, page 22:
      God and Goddess watched as the finite universe continued to develop into a stable platform to sustain finite life and were pleased.

Usage notes[edit]

The word "God" is capitalized in reference to the Abrahamic deity of the Jewish, Christian, and Islamic faiths almost without exception, even when preceded by various qualifiers.[1] The term is frequently, but not always, capitalized in vaguer deistic references to a single deity as well.

Monotheistic Gods are traditionally referenced in English with masculine pronouns and (when depicted) anthropomorphized in the form of adult men, but also traditionally held by theologians to be beyond human sex or gender. Like other languages employing Latin script, English pronouns referring to a God traditionally begin with a capital letter as a sign of respect: He, Him, His, and Himself in the third person and Thee, Thy, Thine, Thyself or You, Your, and Yourself in direct address. However, this use is not universal and the King James Version of the Bible (as well as other modern translations) employs standard uncapitalized pronouns.[2]

Some Jews consider the English word "God" to fall under the Hebrew khumra concerning the avoidance of blasphemy, preferring to use the form G-d or alternatives such as Hashem, Lord, etc.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Noun[edit]

God (plural Gods)

  1. A being such as a monotheistic God: a single divine creator and ruler of the universe.
    • 1563, Barnabe Googe, Eglogs, Epytaphes, and Sonettes, sig. Cviiiv:
      A God there is, that guyds the Globe, and framde the fyckle Spheare.
    • 1911, Katharine Harris Bradley as Michael Field, Accuser, p. 158:
      The Muéddin: God is great, there is no God but God.
    • 1960 April 25, advertisement in Life, p. 125:
      Perhaps this... must involve a relationship with a God of truth—and of love, of mercy, of justice.
    • 2009, Nick Cave, The Death of Bunny Munro, p. 68:
      Whoever said that there isn't a God is full of shit!

Translations[edit]

Interjection[edit]

God

  1. Short for oh God: expressing annoyance or frustration.
    God, is this because of the "I don't love you anymore" T-shirt I bought? It was a joke fer chrissakes.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Citations[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch God.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

God

  1. God

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See god.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

God m

  1. God
    God, neem me mee naar een plek hier ver vandaan. -- Kempi & Willy - Hier Ver Vandaan 2009 [1]
    Oh, mijn God - Oh my god

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English God, see Old English god.

Proper noun[edit]

God (uncountable)

  1. God (the deity of Abrahamic religions)

References[edit]


Saterland Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian god, from Proto-Germanic *gudą. More at god.

Noun[edit]

God m

  1. god
  2. God

Derived terms[edit]


Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English God.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

God

  1. God (Abrahamic monotheistic deity)
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Port Moresby: Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, 1:2:
This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. This language is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

Volapük[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English God.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

God

  1. God

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See god.

Proper noun[edit]

God

  1. God