Herculean

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: herculean

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See Hercules.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (US) IPA(key): /hɜːɹˈkjuːliən/, /ˌhɜːɹkjəˈliːən/

Adjective[edit]

Herculean (comparative more Herculean, superlative most Herculean)

  1. Of extraordinary might, power, size, etc.; suggesting Hercules in size or strength.
    • c. 1606–1607, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Anthonie and Cleopatra”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act I, scene iii], page 343, column 1:
      But this is not the best:—look, pr'ythee, Charmian, / How this Herculean Roman does become / The carriage of his chafe.
    • (Can we date this quote by Bertram Fields and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      It was truly a Herculean effort. I never thought it was going to happen, but it did.
  2. Requiring a huge amount of work; of extraordinary difficulty.
    a Herculean labour

See also[edit]

Translations[edit]