Künstlerromane

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the German Künstlerromane, the nominative plural form of Künstlerroman.

Pronunciation[edit]

as in German

Noun[edit]

Künstlerromane

  1. plural of Künstlerroman
    • 1948, Hans Carossa, Eine Kindheit, page xlvii (B. Blackwell)
      […] great model — apart from contemporary Künstlerromane and impressionist tales of school life — was, as the notes of […]
    • 1974, Fernand Ortmans [ed.], Cosmopolis, volume 3, page 365 (Kraus Reprint)
      With “Künstlerromane” such as “Hermann Ifinger” he at last convinced people he was a writer with ideas, and with his two last novels, “Die Osterinsel” and “Die Rothenburger” he has stepped into the front rank of German novelists.
    • 1981, Naomi Segal, Bithell Series of Dissertations, volume 6: “The Banal Object: Theme and Thematics in Proust, Rilke, Hofmannsthal, and Sartre”, page iv (Institute of Germanic Studies, University of London)
      They are, therefore, Künstlerromane of a particularly problematic kind: most of each text consists of the argument of its own impossibility.
    • 1981, Linda Huf, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Woman: The Female Künstlerromane in America, main title (University of Maryland)
      Portrait of the Artist as a Young Woman: The Female Künstlerromane in America
    • 1982, Constance Marie Perry, Adolescence, Autonomy, and Vocation: Heroines of Künstlerromane by Modern American Women, main title (Indiana University)
      Adolescence, Autonomy, and Vocation: Heroines of Künstlerromane by Modern American Women
    • 1985, Rachel Blau DuPlessis [aut., ed.], Writing beyond the Ending: Narrative Strategies of Twentieth-Century Women Writers, pages 84–104: “To ‘bear my mother’s name:’ Künstlerromane by Women Writers”, essay title (Indiana University Press)
      To “bear my mother’s name:” Künstlerromane by Women Writers
    • 1987, Frank Northen Magill [ed.], The Nobel Prize Winners: Literature, volume 2: “The Nobel Prize Winners: 1927–1961”, page 503 (Salem Press)
      In his early Künstlerromane, such as Klingsor (1920; Klingsor’s Last Summer, 1970), Hesse presents the view that to excel one must escape middle-class conformity through one of two ways: either asceticism or sensuality.
    • 1992, David L. Dysart, North American Studies in Nineteenth-Century German Literature, volume 11: “The Role of the Painting in the Works of Theodor Storm”, page 8 (P. Lang)
      […] or “Künstlerromane” where the arts must of necessity play a role.
    • 1995, Jonathan Harvard Havey, Anxieties of Maternal Influence: Gender, Individuation, and Authorship in the Künstlerromane of Herman Melville and Henry James, main title (State University of New York at Buffalo)
      Anxieties of Maternal Influence: Gender, Individuation, and Authorship in the Künstlerromane of Herman Melville and Henry James
    • 2004, August 17th: Ann Ronchetti, The Artist-Figure, Society, and Sexuality in Virginia Woolf’s Novels, page 13 (Routledge)
      The notion that the artist must withhold his or her “generative energy,” diverting it into artistic creation only, seems to have prevailed in a number of the Künstlerromane of the nineteenth century.
    • 2007, Autumn: Roberta Seelinger Trites, Twain, Alcott, and the Birth of the Adolescent Reform Novel, page 149 (University of Iowa Press)
      [Louise] Fitzhugh’s [Harriet the Spy (1964)] was one of the first overtly feminist künstlerromane written for children.
    • 2008, Regula Hohl Trillini, The Gaze of the Listener: English Representations of Domestic Music-Making, page 7 (Rodopi)
      The English literary imagination never latched on to the modest craftsmen in chapels or theatre pits; professional musicians became fiction-worthy only when the Geniekult started to inspire Künstlerromane around figures like Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Paganini, or Liszt.
    • 2009, Annette R. Federico [ed.], Gilbert and Gubar’s The Madwoman in the Attic after Thirty Years, page 177 (University of Missouri Press)
      Exploring Walden (1854) and Little Women (1868), two autobiographical künstlerromane depicting the education and rise of a young artist, will enable a presentation of Alcott’s criticism and revision of the Transcendental poet-genius ideal.
    • 2010, Mary Jo Bona, By the Breath of Their Mouths: Narratives of Resistance in Italian America, page 135 (State University of New York Press)
      As künstlerromane, Brown Girl, Brownstones and Paper Fish clarify the positions of their artist protagonists as they wend their ways to worlds outside the protective spaces of their respective communities.

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkʏnstlɐʀomaːnə/

Noun[edit]

Künstlerromane m pl

  1. nominative plural of Künstlerroman
  2. genitive plural of Künstlerroman
  3. accusative plural of Künstlerroman