Messer

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: messer

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Two main origins:

  • Borrowed from German Messer (knife), a metonymic occupational surname for a cutler.
  • An English occupational surname for someone who kept watch over harvested crops, from Old French messier (harvest warden).

Proper noun[edit]

Messer (plural Messers)

  1. A surname.

Statistics[edit]

  • According to the 2010 United States Census, Messer is the 1769th most common surname in the United States, belonging to 20306 individuals. Messer is most common among White (93.73%) individuals.

Further reading[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɛsɐ/
  • (file)
  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle High German messer, mezzer, from Old High German mezzir, mezzeres, mezzirahs, mezzisahs (knife), from Proto-West Germanic *matisahs (knife used for cutting food).

Noun[edit]

Messer n (strong, genitive Messers, plural Messer, diminutive Messerchen n or Messerlein n)

  1. knife
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From the verb messen.

Noun[edit]

Messer m (strong, genitive Messers, plural Messer)

  1. agent noun of messen
    1. measurer, surveyor
    2. gauge, meter
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Hunsrik[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

Messer n (plural Messer or Messre, diminutive Messerche)

  1. knife

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

Messer m (plural Messer)

  1. gauge, meter

Further reading[edit]


Luxembourgish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Messer n (plural Messeren, diminutive Messerchen)

  1. knife

Pennsylvania German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare German Messer, Dutch mes.

Noun[edit]

Messer n (plural Messer)

  1. knife