Min

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English[edit]

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Etymology 1[edit]

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From Egyptian

R22
R12
C8

mnw (literally established one), passive participle of

mn
n
Y1V

mn (to establish).

Proper noun[edit]

Min

  1. An Ancient Egyptian god of fertility and procreation.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

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From Mandarin (Mǐn, “Fujian”).

Proper noun[edit]

Min

  1. A river in Fujian, China.
    • 1953, John C. Caldwell, China Coast Family[1], Chicago: Henry Regnery Company, LCCN 53-9623, OCLC 1199230, page 96:
      We traveled down the Min River from Nanping in a small sampan, flying the American flag for protection against bandits and soldiers. Those were the days when the Stars and Stripes still afforded some protection.
    • 1973 November 4, “Matsu is strong, prosperous”, in Free China Weekly[2], volume XIV, number 43, Taipei, ISSN 0016-0318, OCLC 1786626, page 2:
      Matsu is about 200 miles north of Quemoy and flanks the mouth of the Min River. The mainland city of Foochow, famed for its lacquer craftsmanship, is a short distance up the Min.
    • 1975, Alley, Rewi, “Some Fukien Pottery Kilns, Ancient and Modern”, in Eastern Horizon[3], volume XIV, number 3, Hong Kong: Eastern Horizon Press, ISSN 0012-8813, OCLC 751117974, page 26, column 2:
      We left Foochow after an early breakfast, and after half an hour on a boat ferry that took us from the city environs across the Min River and up a tributary, we landed in Minhou county, and took the highway that led across Yungtai county to Tehua.
    • 1978, Beers, Burton F., China in Old Photographs 1860-1910[4], New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, →ISBN, LCCN 78-13220, OCLC 317470124, OL 4714031M, page 111:
      Foochow was a picturesque city of considerable size and consequence before its designation in 1842 as one of the five original treaty ports. It was the headquarters of Manchu civil and military offcialdom in Fukien Province. Its location on the Min River, which flowed through a major tea-producing district, and its excellent harbor gave the city additional importance as a port.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:Min.
  2. A group of related Chinese languages from Fujian, including Min Nan and Min Dong.
  3. A widely construed ethnic group composed of the speakers of those languages.
  4. Fujian province.
    • 1998, Sucheta Mazumdar, Sugar and Society in China: Peasants, Technology and the World Market, Harvard University Asia Center, page 301:
      [] . They were started by people from Min [Fujian]. Now as a result, the profit is similar to that of Min.”
    • 2007, 钟离图美, Food in China, 五洲传播出版社, pages 18–19:
      In the early 1900s, because of the joining of regional cuisines of Zhe (Zhejiang), Min (Fujian), Xiang (Hunan) and Hui (Anhui) Cuisines, []
    • 2013, Angela Schottenhammer, The East Asian “Mediterranean”: A Medium of Flourishing Exchange Relations and Interaction in the East Asian World in 2013, Peter N. Miller, The Sea: Thalassography and Historiography, University of Michigan, page 114:
      [] ; merchant ships from Min province (Fujian) are called “bird ships” []

Etymology 3[edit]

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From Mandarin (Mín).

Proper noun[edit]

Min

  1. A river in Sichuan, China.

Etymology 4[edit]

From Mandarin (Mǐn).

Proper noun[edit]

Min

  1. A male given name
  2. A female given name

Etymology 5[edit]

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(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Proper noun[edit]

Min

  1. The Mountain Ok ethnic group of Sandaun, Papua New Guinea.

Etymology 6[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Min

  1. (obsolete) Alternative form of Ming
    • 1884, Hart, Virgil C., “Taoism”, in John Morrison Reid, editor, Doomed Religions[5], New York: Phillips & Hunt, OCLC 6177798, OL 25129168M, page 298:
      The founder of the Min dynasty (A. D. 1368) declares of him, "He descended repeatedly from heaven to be the imperial teacher; generation after generation he ceased not, but men knew him not. History, which has recorded every thing which could be of interest about Confucius, even to the minutest details of his daily life, failed to hand down the daily acts of a man who, for character and grasp of thought, far transcends his contemporary, Confucius."

Anagrams[edit]