Mongol

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Classical Mongolian ᠮᠣᠩᠭᠣᠯ (moŋɣol), from Middle Mongol ᠮᠣᠩᠬᠣᠯ (moŋqol).

The sense “person with Down syndrome” comes from the fact that people with this condition often have a prominent epicanthic fold, as most people of East Asian ethnicity do.

Noun[edit]

Mongol (plural Mongols)

  1. A person from Mongolia; a Mongolian.
  2. A member of any of the various Mongol ethnic groups living in The Mongolian People's Republic, the (former) USSR, Tibet and Nepal.
  3. (dated, now offensive) A person with Down's syndrome.
    Alternative form: mongol
  4. A member of the nomadic people from the steppes of central Asia who invaded Europe in the 13th century.
  5. A member of the Mongols Motorcycle Club of California, United States.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Mongol (comparative more Mongol, superlative most Mongol)

  1. Synonym of Mongolian.
    • 1878 March–April, Hoinos, “Æsop in Mongolia”, in The Chinese Recorder and Missionary Journal, volume IX, number 2, Shanghai: American Presbyterian Mission Press, page 118:
      THE following fables are selected from a number which a Mongol teacher dictated in his attempts to familiarise a foreigner with the language of Mongolia. It will be seen at a glance that most of them are not native to the country, but come from a laud abounding with sights and scenes unknown to Mongolia. One or two of them, though, have a very Mongol look about them, and doubtless a good many of them have adopted more or less of a Mongol dress.
    • 1997, Sheila Paine, “[Uzbekistan] Shakhrisabz”, in The Golden Horde: Travels from the Himalaya to Karpathos, London: Penguin Books, published 1998, →ISBN, page 145:
      An old woman with a very Mongol face, a bright Uzbek print dress and a shopping bag, got off at every stop and back on again.
    • 2010, Paul D. Buell, Eugene N[ewton] Anderson, “[Juan One] Translation”, in A Soup for the Qan: Chinese Dietary Medicine of the Mongol Era As Seen in Hu Sihui’s Yinshan Zhengyao (Sir Henry Wellcome Asian Series; 9), 2nd edition, Leiden, Boston, Mass.: Brill, →ISBN, part B (Text and Translation), footnote 62, page 287:
      This topping for Iranian bread (or its Chinese derivative shaobing) is truly unique. We know of nothing like it anywhere else. It is also very different from anything else in the YSZY. A very Mongol flavor is implied, if it is not a straight borrowing from nomadic Turks. The “Iranian cakes” are Persian bread (nan), still a staple food in Ningxia and Xinjiang. In the Chinese Islamic Restaurant, a Ningxia Hui restaurant near Los Angeles, we have eaten similar stews with their incomparable nan–style bread. This particular stew, however, is one of the YSZY’s amazing, unique, and creative blendings of Mongol, Near Eastern, and Chinese elements (cf. recipes # 21–23, etc.).
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Proper noun[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Mongol

  1. A Keram language spoken in Papua New Guinea (also known by its native name Mwakai).

References[edit]

  • 1992 Webster's New World Encyclopedia. Prentice Hall
  • 1970 R C H Davis A History of Medieval Europe. Longman SBN 582 48208 9. P404 et. seq.

Anagrams[edit]

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Mongol m anim (feminine Mongolka)

  1. Mongolian, Mongol

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Mongol m (plural Mongols, feminine Mongole)

  1. Mongolian (person)

Luxembourgish[edit]

Noun[edit]

Mongol m (plural Mongolen, feminine Mongolin)

  1. Mongolian

Related terms[edit]

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /mǒnɡoːl/
  • Hyphenation: Mon‧gol

Proper noun[edit]

Mòngōl m (Cyrillic spelling Мо̀нго̄л)

  1. Mongolian (person)

Declension[edit]