Mozart

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

The surname was first recorded in the 14th century as Mozahrt in Germany. It is a compound word, the first part of which is Middle High German mos, also spelt mosz, and meaning “bog, marsh” in southern dialects (compare modern German Moos). The second part is the common name-forming suffix -hart. It was used as a negative nickname for dirty or sloppy people.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Mozart ‎(plural Mozarts)

  1. By analogy with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, a musical virtuoso.
    • Sir William Mitchell, The Place of Minds in the World (1933) p. 142:
      One child is a Mozart with a flying start, while another foots it, and makes little way; but the course is the same, being set by the object.
    • Joseph Lane Hancock, Nature Sketches in Temperate America: A Series of Sketches and Popular Account of Insects, Birds,... (1911) p. 103:
      He is a Mozart in the insect world, sending out his strain upon the evening air.
    • Henry Ward Beecher, Plymouth Pulpit: Sermons Preached in Plymouth Church, Brooklyn (1875) p. 446:
      [W]e can understand how a father who is a good musician may have a son who is a Mozart—a genius in music...
  2. By extension, a virtuoso in any field.
    • Ryan A Nerz, Eat This Book: a year of gorging and glory on the competitive eating circuit (2006) p. 67:
      There is a Mozart of competitive eating who is yet to reveal himself.
    • Victor H. Mair, The Columbia History of Chinese Literature (2001) p. 296:
      Li Po is the most musical, most versatile, and most engaging of Chinese poets, a Mozart of words.
    • Lawrence Grobel, Endangered Species: Writers Talk about Their Craft, Their Visions, Their Lives (2001):
      Joyce Carol Oates has said, "If there is a Mozart of interviewers, Larry Grobel is that individual."
    • Kathryn Ann Lindskoog, Surprised by C.S. Lewis, George MacDonald, and Dante: An Array of Original Discoveries (2001) p. 116:
      In contrast, MacDonald's Gibbie is not only a moral prodigy, but also a Mozart of religious sensibility.
    • Noel Bertram Gerson, Harriet Beecher Stowe: a biography (1976) p. 86:
      By the same token, Rembrandt resembled Hawthorne, and the architect who had designed Melrose Abbey was a Mozart among architects.

Proper noun[edit]

Mozart

  1. A German surname​.
  2. Specifically, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Duden, Familiennamen: Herkunft und Bedeutung (Kolheim)

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmoːˌtsaʁt/, /ˈmoːˌtsaː(ɐ̯)t/, /ˈmoːtsɐt/

Proper noun[edit]

Mozart m, f ‎(genitive Mozarts)

  1. Mozart (name)

Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈmoːt͡saːrt]
  • Hyphenation: Mo‧zart

Proper noun[edit]

Mozart

  1. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
  2. Leopold Mozart

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative Mozart Mozartok
accusative Mozartot Mozartokat
dative Mozartnak Mozartoknak
instrumental Mozarttal Mozartokkal
causal-final Mozartért Mozartokért
translative Mozarttá Mozartokká
terminative Mozartig Mozartokig
essive-formal Mozartként Mozartokként
essive-modal
inessive Mozartban Mozartokban
superessive Mozarton Mozartokon
adessive Mozartnál Mozartoknál
illative Mozartba Mozartokba
sublative Mozartra Mozartokra
allative Mozarthoz Mozartokhoz
elative Mozartból Mozartokból
delative Mozartról Mozartokról
ablative Mozarttól Mozartoktól
Possessive forms of Mozart
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. Mozartom Mozartjaim
2nd person sing. Mozartod Mozartjaid
3rd person sing. Mozartja Mozartjai
1st person plural Mozartunk Mozartjaink
2nd person plural Mozartotok Mozartjaitok
3rd person plural Mozartjuk Mozartjaik

Derived terms[edit]