Pandora

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Translingual[edit]

Crystal128-camera-unmount.svg This entry needs a photograph or drawing for illustration. Please try to find a suitable image on Wikimedia Commons or upload one there yourself!

Etymology[edit]

You can help Wiktionary by providing a proper etymology.

Proper noun[edit]

Pandora f

  1. A taxonomic genus within the family Entomophthoraceae – certain fungi not placed within a phylum.

Hypernyms[edit]

References[edit]


English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek Πανδώρα (Pandṓra, all gifts).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Pandora

  1. (Greek mythology) The first woman on earth, who had been given a box by the gods and instructed not to open it, but who disobeyed the instructions out of curiosity, releasing all manner of evils into the world.
  2. (astronomy) A moon of the planet Saturn.
  3. (astronomy) 55 Pandora, a main belt asteroid.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Basque[edit]

Basque Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia eu

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek Πανδώρα (Pandṓra).

Proper noun[edit]

Pandora

  1. (Greek mythology) Pandora

Catalan[edit]

Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek Πανδώρα (Pandṓra).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Pandora f

  1. (Greek mythology) Pandora

Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek Πανδώρα (Pandṓra).

Proper noun[edit]

Pandora

  1. (Greek mythology) Pandora

Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek Πανδώρα (Pandṓra).

Proper noun[edit]

Pandora f

  1. (Greek mythology) Pandora

Finnish[edit]

Finnish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fi

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek Πανδώρα (Pandṓra).

Proper noun[edit]

Pandora

  1. (Greek mythology) Pandora

German[edit]

German Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia de

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek Πανδώρα (Pandṓra).

Proper noun[edit]

Pandora f

  1. (Greek mythology) Pandora

Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek Πανδώρα (Pandṓra).

Proper noun[edit]

Pandora f

  1. (Greek mythology) Pandora

Anagrams[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

Pandora

  1. Rōmaji transcription of パンドラ

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek Πανδώρα (Pandṓra).

Proper noun[edit]

Pandōra f (genitive Pandōrae); first declension

  1. Pandora
    • Gaius Plinius Secundus, Naturalis historia, 36, 19 — C. Plini Secundi naturalis historiae libri XXXVII. Recognovit atque indicibus instruxit Ludovicus Ianus. Vol. V. Libb. XXXIII–XXXVII. Lipsia, 1878, p. 108:
      in basi autem quod caelatum est Pandoras genesin appellavit, di sunt nascenti adstantes XX numero.
      • The Natural History of Pliny. Translated, with copious notes and illustrations by the late John Bostock and H. T. Riley. Vol. VI. With general index. London, 1857, p. 311:
        To the story chased upon the pedestal of the statue the name of the "Birth of Pandora"29 has been given; and the figures of new-born30 gods to be seen upon it are no less than twenty in number.
        29 "Pandoras Genesis."
        30 Sillig is of opinion that this passage is corrupt, and is inclined to think, with Panofka, that the reading should be "nascenti adstantes," – gods "standing by the new-born" Pandora

Declension[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular
Nominative Pandōra
Genitive Pandōrae
Dative Pandōrae
Accusative Pandōram
Ablative Pandōrā
Vocative Pandōra

References[edit]


Lithuanian[edit]

Lithuanian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia lt

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek Πανδώρα (Pandṓra).

Proper noun[edit]

Pandora f

  1. (Greek mythology) Pandora, the world's first woman

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Luxembourgish[edit]

Luxembourgish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia lb

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek Πανδώρα (Pandṓra).

Proper noun[edit]

Pandora f

  1. (Greek mythology) Pandora

Norwegian[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek Πανδώρα (Pandṓra).

Proper noun[edit]

Pandora

  1. (Greek mythology) Pandora

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek Πανδώρα (Pandṓra).

Proper noun[edit]

Pandora f

  1. (Greek mythology) Pandora

Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek Πανδώρα (Pandṓra).

Proper noun[edit]

Pandora f

  1. (Greek mythology) Pandora (woman who released evil into the world)

Derived terms[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Romanian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ro

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek Πανδώρα (Pandṓra).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Pandora f

  1. (Greek mythology) Pandora

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Serbo-Croatian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sh

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek Πανδώρα (Pandṓra).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /pandǒːra/
  • Hyphenation: Pan‧do‧ra

Proper noun[edit]

Pandóra f (Cyrillic spelling Пандо́ра)

  1. (Greek mythology) Pandora

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek Πανδώρα (Pandṓra).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Pandora f

  1. (Greek mythology) Pandora

Swedish[edit]

Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek Πανδώρα (Pandṓra).

Proper noun[edit]

Pandora

  1. (Greek mythology) Pandora

Turkish[edit]

Turkish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia tr

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek Πανδώρα (Pandṓra).

Proper noun[edit]

Pandora

  1. (Greek mythology) Pandora