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  • police beat ‎(plural police beats) Used other than as an idiom: see police,‎ beat. (Australia, Queensland) A small police station, with a limited range
    1 KB (138 words) - 00:07, 27 July 2016
  • See also: Beat and béat Wikipedia has articles on: beat Wikipedia enPR: bēt, IPA(key): /biːt/ Homophone: beet Rhymes: -iːt From Middle English
    23 KB (1,515 words) - 17:59, 26 July 2016
  • beat cop ‎(plural beat cops) (US) A police officer who patrols the streets on foot (walks the beat)
    173 bytes (18 words) - 21:21, 27 July 2016
  • WOTD – 17 September 2015 pound a beat (idiomatic, usually of a police officer) To walk a regular route. 1948, Alfred Haines Cope, The administration
    1 KB (135 words) - 14:15, 29 July 2016
  • police beats plural of police beat
    115 bytes (6 words) - 14:43, 19 August 2015
  • police officer to beat a suspect. frapi batilo bati tooth From Latin battere, battuere, present active infinitive of battō, battuō ‎(“beat”)
    3 KB (209 words) - 13:50, 22 July 2016
  • ’ said Munday with granite seriousness. ‘Should he make a row with the police […]?  Or should he say nothing about it and condone brutality for fear of
    10 KB (268 words) - 21:46, 21 July 2016
  • traverse a police district or beat. (transitive) To go the rounds of, as a sentry, guard, or policeman; as, to patrol a frontier; to patrol a beat. go the
    7 KB (607 words) - 15:54, 22 July 2016
  • bewail, complain”), from Latin com- ‎(“together”) + plangere ‎(“to strike, beat, as the breast in extreme grief, bewail”); see plain, plaint. IPA(key):
    6 KB (217 words) - 00:16, 22 July 2016
  • stray or wandering animals. 2002, 25th Hour, 00:27:30 from the start: (Police officer to a dog owner) "He'd better stay calm or I'll have the pound come
    19 KB (1,398 words) - 01:47, 25 July 2016
  • there must have been nearly a hundred mongrel celebrants in the throng, the police relied on their firearms and plunged determinedly into the nauseous rout
    7 KB (897 words) - 00:47, 22 July 2016
  • Days[1]: They danced on silently, softly. Their feet played tricks to the beat of the tireless measure, that exquisitely asinine blare which is England's
    3 KB (270 words) - 15:51, 22 July 2016
  • over; I don't roll like that.‎ 2006, Chris McKenna, "Kids at party chant as police sergeant is beaten by angry teens", Times Herald-Record (Middletown, NY)
    31 KB (1,968 words) - 15:35, 25 July 2016
  • big-nosed one”). 2013, Fred Holtby & Chris Lovie, ROWDY - THE STORY OF A POLICE DOG, Lulu.com (ISBN 9781291591651), page 105 They were having a whale of
    12 KB (675 words) - 21:08, 30 July 2016
  • also literally to beat down”), from Romanic desbattere, from Latin dis- ‎(“apart, in different directions”) + battuere ‎(“to beat, to fence”). (UK)
    11 KB (631 words) - 22:07, 21 July 2016
  • /kɒps/ (UK) Homophone: copse cops plural of cop (slang, with the) The police, considered as a group entity. 1906, Horatio Alger, Joe the Hotel Boy "Maybe
    2 KB (115 words) - 20:09, 22 July 2016
  • Qapla'! 2004, Trey Parker, Matt Stone, and Pam Brady, Team America: World Police, Paramount Pictures Sean Penn: Qapla’! 2005 October 19-21, Andrew Chalmers
    2 KB (239 words) - 00:02, 26 January 2016
  • Italy: Containing observations on character, customs, religion, government, police, commerce, arts, and antiquities. With a particular description of the town
    8 KB (560 words) - 23:28, 21 July 2016
  • Freedom," New York Times (retrieved 16 July 2012): Mr. Heirens spent days in police custody and was given truth serum and a spinal tap before confessing to
    2 KB (194 words) - 19:00, 28 July 2016
  • baterie ‎(“action of beating”), from batre ‎(“battre”), from Latin battuō ‎(“beat”), from Gaulish. (UK) IPA(key): /ˈbætəɹi/, /ˈbætɹi/ battery
    12 KB (551 words) - 22:21, 21 July 2016

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