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  • of big science.‎ Popular. That style is very big right now in Europe, especially among teenagers.‎ (informal) Adult. Kids should get help from big people
    23 KB (1,113 words) - 21:09, 24 April 2016
  • of big stations in St. Louis, now primarily a marketplace, and in Kansas City, where a science center is the main tenant. location where science is
    2 KB (220 words) - 19:15, 26 April 2016
  • possessed had bitten the big one years ago; ... (idiomatic) To perform poorly; to fail. 1990, Norman Spinrad, Science fiction in the real world
    1 KB (177 words) - 18:21, 20 January 2016
  • his own investigation, in which he concluded: “The term Big Data, which spans computer science and statistics/econometrics, probably originated in the
    3 KB (318 words) - 20:03, 27 April 2016
  • most significant byte (category en:Computer science)
    significant bytes) (computer science) The byte of a multibyte number with the greatest importance: that is, the byte stored first on a big-endian system or last
    405 bytes (43 words) - 22:41, 25 April 2016
  • least significant byte (category en:Computer science)
    significant bytes) (computer science) The byte of a multibyte number with the least importance: that is, the byte stored last on a big-endian system or first
    383 bytes (42 words) - 02:02, 19 January 2016
  • about American culture; we’re talking about science. You can see that if a character on this show uses big, scientific sounding words, the normal audience
    2 KB (260 words) - 15:20, 10 November 2012
  • Dictionary of Science Fiction, Oxford; New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, ISBN 978-0-19-530567-8, page 165 robotic n. at the OED Science Fiction Citations
    2 KB (164 words) - 23:24, 25 April 2016
  • yield (category en:Materials science)
    recent weeks but they are still unattractive. Equities have suffered two big bear markets since 2000 and are wobbling again. It is hardly surprising that
    12 KB (716 words) - 22:19, 25 April 2016
  • underway (category en:Computer science)
    traffic beneath bergs, burgs and villages and into and around and under big city downtowns ... a voyage, especially underwater 2008, Alfred Scott
    5 KB (347 words) - 01:15, 26 April 2016
  • ‎(“great, large”), from Old English grēat ‎(“big, thick, coarse, stour, massive”), from Proto-Germanic *grautaz ‎(“big in size, coarse, coarse grained”), from
    20 KB (1,065 words) - 15:24, 25 April 2016
  • Street. But so many children came […] and the Tenth Street house wasn't half big enough; and a dreadful speculative builder built this house and persuaded
    4 KB (405 words) - 16:45, 25 April 2016
  • speciality is genetic engineering 1954 October, Anderson, Poul, “Big Rain”, Astounding Science Fiction, volume 54, number 2, page 22: Meanwhile giant pulverizers
    2 KB (165 words) - 21:35, 1 February 2016
  • book since the 2008 essay collection Natural Acts: A Sidelong View of Science and Nature, David Quammen looks at the natural world from yet another angle:
    2 KB (77 words) - 08:39, 3 April 2016
  • filk music. This is music for and by fans of Fantasy and Science Fiction. […] Filk is nearly as big a part of my creative life as comics, and I have similarly
    7 KB (903 words) - 22:05, 25 April 2016
  • and origin of the universe. cosmologist cosmogony cosmological study of the physical universe eschatology big bang theory steady state theory
    3 KB (158 words) - 14:12, 26 April 2016
  • search for the next human pandemic, what epidemiologists call “the next big one.” His quest leads him around the world to study a variety of suspect
    3 KB (146 words) - 01:16, 26 April 2016
  • French gros ‎(“big, thick, large, stout”), from Late Latin grossus ‎(“thick in diameter, coarse”), and Medieval Latin grossus ‎(“great, big”), from Old High
    11 KB (703 words) - 23:26, 25 April 2016
  • has an article on: atomic bomb Wikipedia Coined by British science fiction author H. G. Wells in his 1914 novel The World Set Free. atomic
    3 KB (99 words) - 21:32, 24 April 2016
  • for Propylene Epoxidation to Propylene Oxide”[1], Science, volume 292, number 5519, DOI:10.1126/science.292.5519.1139, pages 1139-1141: Although catalyst
    2 KB (214 words) - 16:24, 27 April 2016

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