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  • coast (category Requests for quotation/Sir Isaac Newton)
    of something. [15th-18th c.] (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Isaac Newton to this entry?) The edge of the land where it meets an ocean, sea, gulf
    10 KB (519 words) - 23:10, 23 July 2016
  • shut (category Requests for quotation/Sir Isaac Newton)
    A door or cover; a shutter. (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Isaac Newton to this entry?) The line or place where two pieces of metal are welded
    8 KB (357 words) - 01:14, 25 July 2016
  • prick (category Requests for quotation/Isaac Newton)
    it [a slice] on a prong of iron. (Can we find and add a quotation of Isaac Newton to this entry?) (intransitive, dated) To be punctured; to suffer or
    15 KB (1,304 words) - 19:39, 21 July 2016
  • traject (category Requests for quotation/Sir Isaac Newton)
    through three or more cross prisms (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Isaac Newton to this entry?) Part or all of this entry has been imported from the
    835 bytes (158 words) - 20:51, 25 July 2016
  • 21, “Magician’s brain”, in The Economist, volume 411, number 8892: [Isaac Newton] was obsessed with alchemy. He spent hours copying alchemical recipes
    1 KB (94 words) - 17:36, 22 July 2016
  • “Magician’s brain”, in The Economist, volume 411, number 8892: The [Isaac] Newton that emerges from the [unpublished] manuscripts is far from the popular
    3 KB (146 words) - 00:54, 22 July 2016
  • plural newtoniens, feminine plural newtoniennes) Newtonian (related to Isaac Newton) “newtonien” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized
    171 bytes (32 words) - 14:53, 6 June 2014
  • From the interior toward the exterior; in an outward direction. Sir Isaac Newton Light falling on them is not reflected outwards. (obsolete) Outwardly;
    963 bytes (82 words) - 00:45, 22 July 2016
  • funipendulous (category Requests for quotation/Sir Isaac Newton)
    funipendulous ‎(not comparable) Hanging from a rope. (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Isaac Newton to this entry?) filipendulous
    159 bytes (22 words) - 18:59, 27 April 2016
  • Wikipedia's article on Sir Isaac Newton. You can help us collect durably archived uses of this word at Citations:Sir Isaac Newton. If this term meets our
    95 bytes (75 words) - 23:32, 25 May 2014
  • most Newtonian) Of or relating to Isaac Newton, or his laws and theories. (fluid mechanics, of a fluid) Obeying Newton's law of viscosity; i.e. having a
    1 KB (73 words) - 19:34, 22 July 2016
  • defined as a conchoid. c. 1695, Isaac Newton, 1976, D. T. Whiteside (editor), The Mathematical Papers of Isaac Newton, Volume 7: 1691-1695, page 621,
    3 KB (295 words) - 22:54, 25 July 2016
  • also: Newton Wikipedia has an article on: newton Wikipedia Named after the English scientist Sir Isaac Newton. newton ‎(plural newtons) In the
    3 KB (103 words) - 15:56, 24 June 2016
  • series of any kind. 1664, Isaac Newton, David Brewster, editor, Memoirs of the life, writings and discoveries of Sir Isaac Newton[1], published 1855, page
    2 KB (191 words) - 14:58, 27 April 2016
  • Isaac Newton, English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, alchemist, and natural philosopher place name surname newton Newtonian Newton's
    2 KB (59 words) - 18:16, 7 July 2016
  • 21, “Magician’s brain”, in The Economist, volume 411, number 8892: [Isaac Newton] was obsessed with alchemy. He spent hours copying alchemical recipes
    5 KB (155 words) - 08:20, 10 July 2016
  • ingredients) One of the substances present in a mixture, especially food. Sir Isaac Newton By way of analysis we may proceed from compounds to ingredients. Arbuthnot
    4 KB (106 words) - 04:32, 17 June 2016
  • dominance deserved. Bright; vivid; glowing; strong; vigorous. 1704, Isaac Newton, Opticks: Or, A Treatise of the Reflections, Refractions, Inflections
    6 KB (498 words) - 14:14, 22 July 2016
  • “Magician’s brain”, in The Economist, volume 411, number 8892: The [Isaac] Newton that emerges from the [unpublished] manuscripts is far from the popular
    3 KB (189 words) - 14:17, 22 July 2016
  • (transitive) To weaken, especially by adding a foreign substance. Sir Isaac Newton Lest these colours should be diluted and weakened by the mixture of any
    4 KB (272 words) - 14:36, 22 July 2016

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