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  • (of a course of action) Worthy of being recommended; desirable. 1813, Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, ch. 19, Perhaps it will be advisable for me to
    1 KB (66 words) - 16:16, 18 January 2016
  • really due to his character, without any embellishment of tenderness to lead the fancy astray. Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility, Section 3, Chapter 1.
    1 KB (73 words) - 21:57, 17 October 2015
  • formality, in her figure, and serious, even to sourness , in her aspect. — Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility, Chapter 2.1. quality or condition said
    1 KB (55 words) - 08:50, 17 December 2014
  • +‎ -ing IPA(key): /ˈlaɪ.ɪŋ/ lying present participle of lie 1811, Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility The Free Library, Chapter 19: Without shutting
    1 KB (125 words) - 02:39, 26 November 2015
  • by the office move. Lacking pretense or affectation; natural. 1812, Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 3: Mr. Bingley was good-looking and gentlemanlike;
    1 KB (74 words) - 14:16, 18 October 2015
  • verandah ‎(plural verandahs) Alternative spelling of veranda 1818, Jane Austen, Persuasion: […] and yet, though desirous to be gone, she could not quit
    1,001 bytes (109 words) - 19:03, 16 October 2015
  • Wikipedia elopement ‎(plural elopements) The act of eloping 1814, Jane Austen, Mansfield Park, chapter 46 You may not have heard of the last blow--
    629 bytes (73 words) - 07:46, 14 August 2015
  • past and past participle scolded) To rebuke. 1813, Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen A week elapsed before she could see Elizabeth without scolding her —
    4 KB (213 words) - 02:49, 25 January 2016
  • austenite Austen +‎ -ite ‎(“follower or adherent of a specified person”). Austenite ‎(plural Austenites) a fan or admirer of Jane Austen; someone who
    2 KB (188 words) - 19:29, 20 January 2016
  • which all my reasoning is, at times, insufficient to allay. 1815, Jane Austen, Emma, page 395 The consciousness of having done amiss, had exposed her
    1 KB (98 words) - 21:38, 21 October 2015
  • precious into a surprisingly palatable, even charming man. 1813, Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice: "What a charming amusement for young people this
    3 KB (191 words) - 13:36, 29 January 2016
  • ‎(comparative more wanting, superlative most wanting) Absent or lacking. 1813, Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, Modern Library Edition (1995), page 171, […] but
    1 KB (73 words) - 22:01, 16 July 2015
  • superlative most perceivable) Capable of being perceived; discernible. 1818, Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey, ch. 5, Every search for him was equally unsuccessful
    1,013 bytes (92 words) - 23:56, 20 October 2015
  • his weapon, tho' it was not as yet in above half its length. c. 1795, Jane Austen, Lady Susan, ch. 22: This is insufferable! My dearest friend, I was never
    2 KB (193 words) - 13:45, 24 October 2015
  • a lover, set out with all his equipage and appurtenances; ... 1814: Jane Austen, Mansfield Park One could not expect anybody to take such a part. Nothing
    1 KB (113 words) - 06:30, 24 July 2015
  • asthma to autism. (obsolete) To the greatest extent; most. 1817, Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey, [1]: She was to be their chosen visitor, she was to
    4 KB (160 words) - 01:11, 17 January 2016
  • subjects, usually engaged in at social gatherings out of politeness. 1814, Jane Austen, Mansfield Park, ch. 7: [T]o the credit of the lady it may be added that
    3 KB (153 words) - 21:42, 18 January 2016
  • using one's fingers in the playing of a musical instrument. 1813 CE: Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice She has a very good notion of fingering, though
    3 KB (119 words) - 17:02, 18 January 2016
  • Jane +‎ -ite, coined by critic George Saintsbury. Janeite ‎(plural Janeites) (usually pejorative) A fan of the author Jane Austen, especially one without
    1 KB (138 words) - 21:35, 24 January 2016
  • come cleanly away, […]. polished shoes‎ Refined, elegant. 1813, Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice: "What a charming amusement for young people this
    2 KB (229 words) - 21:56, 7 February 2016

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