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  • settle on. Also, it may be in reference to the book Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck. Main characters George and Lennie always talk about owning their own
    3 KB (482 words) - 15:02, 22 July 2016
  • interminable stories, until the last listener was fast asleep […] 1937, John Steinbeck, Of Mice and Men: And then her words tumbled out in a passion of communication
    4 KB (120 words) - 19:49, 14 August 2016
  • Hobos, misfits, criminals, wanderers or drifting harvest workers. 1937, John Steinbeck, Of Mice and Men, Covici Friede (publisher): “So maybe you better jus’
    718 bytes (86 words) - 21:21, 24 April 2016
  • month came I could take my fifty bucks an' go to a... cat house..." John Steinbeck. Of Mice and Men. Chapter 6 hot sauce, house cat, housecat, soutache
    572 bytes (87 words) - 15:30, 23 July 2016
  • foot, with blood . . . that's dried into the openwork stocking. 1942, John Steinbeck, The Moon is Down: It was a picture of a girl, all legs and dress and
    897 bytes (103 words) - 14:30, 27 July 2016
  • superlative purtiest) (informal) Eye dialect spelling of pretty. 1939, John Steinbeck, chapter 22, in The Grapes of Wrath: Seen a purty girl down the road
    904 bytes (124 words) - 12:02, 16 June 2016
  • deep sigh) and to know if her happiness had yet taken place. 1945, John Steinbeck, Cannery Row‎, page 168: They borrowed a female [cat] in an interesting
    2 KB (199 words) - 14:03, 27 July 2016
  • sense is that it derives from the John Steinbeck memoir Travels with Charley: In Search of America, in which Steinbeck used the term sarcastically while
    3 KB (374 words) - 00:32, 23 July 2016
  • the language all instruction is done in the target language. 1957, John Steinbeck, The Short Reign of Pippin IV: A Fabrication, page 103 "Clotilde is
    1 KB (201 words) - 21:37, 20 October 2015
  • version of the children's game gilli-danda. 1932, "Junius Maltby" by John Steinbeck He was clumsy at the new games, but his teachers did not hoot at him
    807 bytes (97 words) - 00:28, 22 July 2016
  • daddy / sugar baby Web sites! A term of endearment; sweetheart. 1926, John Steinbeck, The Saturday Evening Post, Volume 198, link "Sugar baby, daddy not
    3 KB (283 words) - 16:24, 18 October 2015
  • for he would steal from the bindles of his fellow wanderers. 1952, John Steinbeck, East of Eden: And before he knew it he was a bindlestiff himself.
    1 KB (147 words) - 20:02, 23 July 2016
  • American literary stars like Hemingway, Faulkner, Sinclair Lewis and John Steinbeck, Nobel Prize-winners one and all, never had more than a spoonful of
    2 KB (199 words) - 18:56, 25 July 2016
  • excessive degree; bravado; youthful energy. [from mid-20th c.] 1940, John Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath, Viking, p. 248: "I know what's a matter. Young
    1 KB (100 words) - 14:27, 26 July 2016
  • by a charismatic preacher in small towns in the United States. 1939, John Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath, p. 20: You use ta give a good meetin'. I recollect
    12 KB (481 words) - 21:29, 4 August 2016
  • Wikipedia (offensive, ethnic slur) Mimicking Chinese speech. 1952, John Steinbeck, East of Eden “Hey there, Ching Chong, bring the pistol.” In a moment
    915 bytes (122 words) - 19:09, 27 July 2016
  • has done in the years wouldn't help any organization much. 1939, John Steinbeck, In dubious battle[2], The Modern Library, New York, page 245: None
    1 KB (115 words) - 23:12, 27 July 2016
  • (chiefly Britain, usually childish) A child's term for mother. 1926, John Steinbeck, The Saturday Evening Post, Volume 198, page 9, “Oh, mummy, would you
    14 KB (708 words) - 23:13, 21 July 2016
  • superlative most tearingly) With a tearing or ripping motion. 1933, John Steinbeck, To a God Unknown The beast sat on its haunches and tearingly ate the
    496 bytes (60 words) - 21:36, 30 May 2014
  • employee in a liquor saloon; a cook's assistant. [from 20th c.] 1937, John Steinbeck, Of Mice and Men, Penguin 1994, p. 19: The old swamper shifted his broom
    3 KB (384 words) - 16:41, 26 July 2016

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