Search results

Jump to: navigation, search
These entry templates may help when adding words:
Template with tutorial.
Pick up that cross.
Move those crosses here.
 
He was very cross.
He said it very crossly.
She was even crosser.
He was the crossest.
Why did he cross the road?
When she crosses.
Is he crossing?
Has she crossed yet?
Select a different language
American Sign Language:
Spanish:
Swedish:

  • cowardly) In the manner of a coward. 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, Folio Society, 2006, vol.1, p.48: I love to follow them
    3 KB (103 words) - 10:57, 8 December 2015
  • (archaic) A skeleton, or dead body. 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, Folio Society, 2006, vol.1 p.68: So did the Ægyptians, who
    6 KB (378 words) - 14:31, 19 January 2016
  • advised not to contrary the king. 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, I.47: The Athenians having left the enemie in their owne
    4 KB (432 words) - 17:19, 18 January 2016
  • matter of established occurrence. 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.19: It is ordinarily seene how good intentions, being
    2 KB (83 words) - 20:40, 18 January 2016
  • wicked; atrocious or outrageous. 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.12: how apt wee are to receive all impressions, and chiefly
    4 KB (231 words) - 15:53, 18 January 2016
  • great precision; accurately, exactly. 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.14: It is a pleasant imagination to conceive a spirit
    2 KB (118 words) - 00:17, 19 January 2016
  • vigorously, with strength or exertion. 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, Folio Society, 2006, vol.1, p.148: Let him hardly be possest
    6 KB (406 words) - 16:15, 29 January 2016
  • humour or mood; capricious, whimsical. 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.8: It is a melancholy humor […] that first put this humorous
    2 KB (124 words) - 22:03, 18 January 2016
  • intelligent, skilful, ingenious. 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.7: It hath beene a witty invention […] to establish and
    3 KB (202 words) - 22:32, 16 October 2015
  • injuried) (obsolete) To wrong, to injure. 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.12: The best of us doth not so much feare to wrong him
    6 KB (165 words) - 17:52, 18 January 2016
  • happily) (archaic) By chance; perhaps. 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.12: And who knoweth whether a thousand yeares hence a
    4 KB (159 words) - 01:07, 19 January 2016
  • rare degree; very. [from 16th c.] 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.32: others speake very honourably of his life and death
    3 KB (174 words) - 14:55, 8 December 2015
  • to a medical doctor or physician. 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, III.13: We have no need of doctorall consultations or collegian
    1 KB (107 words) - 17:00, 25 January 2016
  • Alternative form of sely or silly. 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, Folio Society, 2006, vol.1, p.57: Whereas the poore, the
    329 bytes (45 words) - 23:40, 22 January 2016
  • children; macho, mannish, virile. 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.17: In events, I carry my selfe man-like; in the conduct
    659 bytes (74 words) - 15:53, 17 October 2015
  • loudly, powerfully. [14th-19th c.] 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.31: But in the end, mainly crying out, he fell to raling
    3 KB (168 words) - 11:47, 8 December 2015
  • Urgently; with insistence. [from 15th c.] 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.27: Theoxena although she were instantly urged thereunto
    3 KB (193 words) - 13:50, 8 February 2016
  • labour for a living; coarse, vulgar. 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, I.43: all manner of silks were already become so vile and
    5 KB (268 words) - 00:48, 17 January 2016
  • something added which stains, taints etc. 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.20: Metrodorus said that in sadnesse there is some aloy
    4 KB (163 words) - 04:41, 21 January 2016
  • Ingenuousness; honesty, straightforwardness. 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.17: And therefore I apply my selfe to ingenuitie, and
    3 KB (89 words) - 22:56, 18 January 2016

View (previous 20 | next 20) (20 | 50 | 100 | 250 | 500)