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  • recession on both sides too) he has performed brilliantly. 1774, Dr Samuel Johnson, Preface to the Works of the English Poets, J. Nichols, Volume II, Page
    1 KB (116 words) - 19:08, 18 January 2016
  • (colloquial) A demyship. 1781, Samuel Johnson, Addison, Lives of the Poets, 1840, Arthur Murphy (editor), The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL. D., Volume 2, page
    1 KB (85 words) - 23:27, 18 January 2016
  • a towne, he will leave both worke and shop. 1742, Samuel Johnson, The Works of Samuel Johnson, Vol.6: He may, among the drunkards, be a hearty fellow
    1 KB (165 words) - 00:48, 27 January 2016
  • hastes To enter Rome with fury, sword and fire. 1825, Samuel Johnson, The Works of Samuel Johnson in Nine Volumes[2]: He hastes away to another, whom his
    5 KB (345 words) - 02:32, 18 January 2016
  • surprise. 1723, Jonathan Swift, The Journal of a Modern Lady, 1810, Samuel Johnson, The Works of the English Poets, from Chaucer to Cowper, Volume 11,
    6 KB (435 words) - 19:04, 17 January 2016
  • scientific study of fluids at rest, especially when under pressure. 1774, Dr Samuel Johnson, Preface to the Works of the English Poets, J. Nichols, Volume II, Page
    1 KB (53 words) - 02:13, 18 January 2016
  • already had their full course against him. 1825, Samuel Johnson, The Works of Samuel Johnson in Nine Volumes[2]: Upon the whole, as the author seems
    1 KB (147 words) - 19:17, 19 January 2016
  • experiencing, indicating, causing, or characterized by bliss. 1738, Samuel Johnson, "London: A Poem in Imitation of the Third Satire of Juvenal", lines
    3 KB (266 words) - 07:01, 30 January 2016
  • Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, Act1, Scene 5, 1794, Edmond Malone, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens, Alexander Pope (editors), The Plays and Poems of William
    2 KB (100 words) - 16:46, 17 October 2015
  • Joking, humorous remarks or behaviour. 1791, James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson: It should seem he had that day been in a humour for jocularity and
    734 bytes (49 words) - 21:58, 24 May 2014
  • is not natural or real; false display; artificial show. 1810, Dr. Samuel Johnson, “Life of Gower”, in The Works of the English Poets[1], Digitized
    3 KB (118 words) - 02:44, 25 January 2016
  • receiving or taking in. Construed with of, for or an infinitive. 1775 Samuel Johnson, A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland (Works 10.479): He has
    3 KB (163 words) - 19:43, 18 January 2016
  • as a form of government. [from 17th c.] 1791, James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson: Sir, there is one Mrs Macaulay in this town, a great republican. One
    4 KB (227 words) - 02:18, 25 January 2016
  • chastiser ‎(plural chastisers) Someone who chastises 1779 Samuel Johnson (ed) - The Works of the English Poets That kind chastiser of thy soul in joy!
    442 bytes (52 words) - 19:50, 20 October 2015
  • condition of being swollen (countable) an instance of such swelling 1755, Samuel Johnson, A Dictionary of the English Language, 10: ...but there are other causes
    858 bytes (71 words) - 17:00, 24 January 2016
  • actions are motivated only or primarily by base desires or selfishness. Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) I hope it is no very cynical asperity not to confess obligations
    3 KB (266 words) - 13:45, 8 December 2015
  • 1791, James Boswell, The life of Samuel Johnson, LL. D.: I never shall forget the alacrity with which Johnson answered, striking his foot with mighty
    6 KB (390 words) - 15:55, 18 January 2016
  • ‎(plural lexicographers) one who writes or compiles a dictionary 1755, Samuel Johnson, A Dictionary of the English Language: A writer of dictionaries; a
    3 KB (118 words) - 22:53, 16 January 2016
  • act 5, scene 1: How silent is this town! 1825, Samuel Johnson, Arthur Murphy, The Works of Samuel Johnson, Talboys and Wheeler, page 52: What was formerly
    11 KB (547 words) - 01:31, 31 January 2016
  • never thought he'd be capable of murder.‎ a. 1859, Thomas Macaulay, "Samuel Johnson," in 1871, Lady Trevelyan (Hannah More Macaulay Trevelyan, editor),
    13 KB (1,046 words) - 01:34, 18 January 2016

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