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  • arguendo (category en:Law)
    respondent's claim to be without legal merit. (law) Used to set off the facts presented in an argument on a point of law from facts in dispute in the case
    1 KB (121 words) - 17:01, 22 July 2016
  • law usage, practice, customary observance or prescribed conduct, duty right, justice (often as a synonym of punishment) religion, religious merit Law
    4 KB (346 words) - 01:40, 16 April 2016
  • pet project, but was rejected on the merits. (law) Substance, distinguished from form or procedure. The merits of the case favored the plaintiffs, but
    997 bytes (68 words) - 00:53, 22 July 2016
  • nonsuit (category en:Law)
    ‎(plural nonsuits) (law) A lawsuit that is dismissed as having been brought without cause, prior to an adjudication on the merits. (law) A neglect or failure
    755 bytes (102 words) - 16:47, 4 May 2016
  • meretricious (category en:Law)
    meretrīx ‎(“harlot, prostitute”), from mereō ‎(“earn, deserve, merit”) (English merit) + -trīx ‎(“(female agent)”) (English -trix). IPA(key): /ˌmɛrɪˈtrɪʃəs/
    3 KB (213 words) - 16:39, 22 July 2016
  • award (category en:Law)
    accomplishment, especially in a competition. A prize or honor based on merit. (obsolete) Care, keeping. 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte d’Arthur, Bk
    7 KB (483 words) - 23:29, 21 July 2016
  • frivolous (category en:Law)
    importance; not worth notice; slight. (law) In litigation, a lawsuit filed by a party who is aware the claim is without merit and has no reasonable prospect of
    4 KB (200 words) - 13:02, 22 July 2016
  • default (category en:Law)
    pardon craved for his so rash default. Alexander Pope regardless of our merit or default by default (finance) condition of failing to meet an obligation
    6 KB (470 words) - 23:16, 21 July 2016
  • opportunity. 1709, Alexander Pope, An Essay on Criticism Be thou the first true merit to befriend; / His praise is lost, who stays till all commend. 1712, Joseph
    5 KB (588 words) - 00:08, 22 July 2016
  • im- ‎(“un-”, “not”) + meritorious ‎(“worthy or deserving of merit”); compare the Latin immeritōrius (Received Pronunciation) enPR: ĭmĕrĭtôʹrĭəs, IPA(key):
    2 KB (156 words) - 17:17, 7 July 2016
  • procés (category ca:Law)
    letters Where the journey and the works Of the lady were described She who was of such great merit. English: process (borrowed) French: procès
    943 bytes (96 words) - 21:48, 15 March 2016
  • and " Usonians " sounding equally well. It has also to US Scots the added merit of making a good rhyme to Caledonia, and thus knitting more closely together
    5 KB (685 words) - 19:35, 18 January 2016
  • contumely, The pangs of despised love, the law's delay, The insolence of office and the spurns That patient merit of the unworthy takes, When he himself might
    2 KB (181 words) - 15:22, 22 July 2016
  • prime directive that a work of art must stand upon its intrinisic artistic merits 1955: René Albrecht-Carrié, Europe After 1815, p. 32: The prime directive
    851 bytes (132 words) - 18:24, 21 October 2015
  • remit. terms of reference; set of responsibilities responsibility merit miter mitre timer remit third-person singular past historic of remettre
    8 KB (632 words) - 00:29, 22 July 2016
  • exhibit (category en:Law)
    dawning upon him that his eccentricity was not receiving the ovation it merited. (transitive) To demonstrate. The players exhibited great skill.‎ 1918
    8 KB (348 words) - 18:13, 22 July 2016
  • Distinguished appearance; magnificence; conspicuous representation; splendour; show. Law that he may live in figure and indulgence A human figure, which dress or
    15 KB (989 words) - 22:19, 21 July 2016
  • fix that unbounded passion for variety, which often discovered personal merit in the meanest of mankind. (obsolete) Self-indulgent, fond of excess;
    10 KB (997 words) - 22:59, 21 July 2016
  • (Can we date this quote?) John Milton high disdain from sense of injured merit Sound practical or moral judgment. It's common sense not to put metal
    17 KB (609 words) - 21:09, 21 July 2016
  • try to criticize product x, but it makes millions, so it must have some merit." Examples: If you’re so smart, why aren’t you rich? I think Mary is a good
    2 KB (309 words) - 00:24, 28 April 2016

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