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  • From κλέπτω ‎(kléptō, “steal”) + ὕδωρ ‎(húdōr, “water”), literally water thief. κλεψύδρα • ‎(klepsúdra) f ‎(genitive κλεψύδρας); first declension klepsydra
    516 bytes (96 words) - 03:41, 16 July 2016
  • (US, slang) A petty thief or waterfront ruffian. (slang) A person fond of water sports. (slang, Australia) A member of the water police. Eurasian mammal
    1 KB (87 words) - 19:09, 22 July 2016
  • ago, when cyanobacteria evolved photosynthesis: the ability to convert water and carbon dioxide into carbohydrates and waste oxygen using solar energy
    11 KB (196 words) - 21:04, 21 July 2016
  • immersed in water or other fluid. When I was a baby, I nearly drowned in the bathtub. (transitive) To kill another in this manner. The car thief fought with
    7 KB (389 words) - 00:38, 22 July 2016
  • Compare archaic Daco-Romanian fur. furu, afur, afuru fur m ‎(plural furi) thief, robber furcudar, haramiu, chisãgi, caceac fur m ‎(plural furs) fuero
    11 KB (667 words) - 23:33, 21 July 2016
  • English lencten (compare Lent) by the 14th century. Sense of ‘source of water’ attested circa 1225. enPR: sprĭng, IPA(key): /spɹɪŋ/ Rhymes: -ɪŋ
    46 KB (2,384 words) - 11:48, 29 July 2016
  • on the advice of my hostess's daughter Roberta, I had punctured his hot-water bottle with a darning needle in the small hours of the morning. Quite unintentional
    10 KB (684 words) - 21:31, 27 July 2016
  • (of a shoe) suola third-person singular present indicative of suolare second-person singular imperative of suolare From suollit +‎ -a. suola thief
    2 KB (123 words) - 15:56, 18 June 2016
  • Scene III, line 130. Borachio: Seest thou not, I say, what a deformed thief this fashion is, how giddily ’a turns about all the hot-bloods between fourteen
    2 KB (252 words) - 19:07, 25 April 2016
  • steal, thief”). Cognates include Estonian sala ‎(“secretly”), Northern Sami suoládit ‎(“to keep secret, to conceal”), Northern Sami suola ‎(“thief”), Eastern
    11 KB (879 words) - 19:43, 25 July 2016
  • robbed of $447, Office Manager Howard Willson got a phone call from the thief who complained: "You didn't have enough money over there." Indicating
    36 KB (3,597 words) - 19:37, 21 July 2016
  • thieves' slang. swag ‎(plural swags) (uncountable) The booty of a burglar or thief; boodle. 1838, Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist, Chapter 19: “It′s all arranged
    11 KB (1,119 words) - 00:31, 22 July 2016
  • or other Magistrates, and taker of the Thief, the expences waired out by them in taking and putting the Thief to execution. wair Nonstandard form
    3 KB (302 words) - 23:19, 27 July 2016
  • Ascham to this entry?) (obsolete, slang) A pickpocket; a young or petty thief. A fish, the cunner. A European crab (Polybius henslowii). The claws of
    3 KB (380 words) - 23:45, 21 July 2016
  • lands that at present surround Hudson's Bay. 1914, Rhys Carpenter, The Sun-Thief: and other poems, page 6–7: What fairer home than Earth's eternal hill Paved
    2 KB (301 words) - 19:41, 26 April 2016
  • dry up”) with an extra infix -n-. The original meaning was probably “thin water layer, spray, drops,” whence “small, tiny.” Cognates include Lithuanian
    5 KB (491 words) - 20:55, 28 July 2016
  • Old French furet, from Vulgar Latin *fūrittus, diminutive of Latin fūr ‎(“thief”). fret m ‎(plural fretten, diminutive fretje n) ferret, Mustela putorius
    10 KB (842 words) - 13:31, 22 July 2016
  • appeals, without detaining himself in his sacred mission! (Brazil, slang) thief; robber 1959, Ferrucio Fabbri, A estação, Livraria São José, page 44: Abafador
    8 KB (908 words) - 23:12, 28 July 2016
  • policeman broke sixty on a residential street in his hurry to catch the thief. (sports and games): (transitive, tennis) To win a game (against one's
    46 KB (2,761 words) - 20:11, 21 July 2016
  • decoy in the rest of the Parish. (crime, obsolete) An accomplice of a thief or criminal acting as bait. 1526, W. Bonde, Pylgrimage of Perfection, III:
    28 KB (3,182 words) - 22:27, 21 July 2016

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