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  • Rousseau’s Bot. v. 55 The arrangement of the flowers in the elder is called a cyme. 1854 S. Thomson Wild Fl. iii. (ed. 4) 250 The meadow-sweet, with its crowded
    8 KB (687 words) - 20:46, 28 June 2017
  • Κῡμαῖος (Kūmaîos) Greek: Κύμη (Kými) Italian: Cuma Latin: Cūmae; Cȳmē Woodhouse, S. C. (1910) English–Greek Dictionary: A Vocabulary of the Attic Language[1]
    752 bytes (143 words) - 04:10, 2 July 2017
  • From the Latin cȳmula (“a tender sprout”), the diminutive form of cȳma, whence the English cyma and, ultimately, cyme. cymule (plural cymules) (botany)
    383 bytes (94 words) - 12:51, 24 June 2017
  • From Ancient Greek σκορπιοειδής (skorpioeidḗs, “scorpionlike”), from σκορπίος (skorpíos, “scorpion”) + εἶδος (eîdos, “form, likeness”). scorpioid (comparative
    358 bytes (40 words) - 15:55, 25 May 2017
  • Diminutive of Latin glomus ball. glomerule (plural glomerules) (botany) A head or dense cluster of flowers, formed by condensation of a cyme, as in the
    282 bytes (90 words) - 15:40, 24 May 2017
  • Latin verticillus (“a whirl”) + aster (“a star”). verticillaster (plural verticillasters) (botany) A whorl of flowers apparently of one cluster, but composed
    288 bytes (89 words) - 14:52, 24 May 2017
  • See also: сума sima, syma [16th century]; cima, scima [18th century] From New Latin cȳma (“young sprout or shoot of cabbage”) (whence the botanic usage
    6 KB (740 words) - 04:14, 8 June 2017
  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: sīʹmoid, IPA(key): /ˈsaɪmɔɪd/ cyma +‎ -oid cymatoid (rare) cymoid (comparative more cymoid, superlative most cymoid)
    1 KB (184 words) - 13:42, 28 July 2016
  • See also: LORD, Lord, Lords, and Lord's Wikipedia has an article on: Lord Wikipedia From Middle English lord and lorde (attested from the 15th
    20 KB (1,481 words) - 10:42, 8 July 2017
  • See also: Stephanotis From the genus name. stephanotis (plural stephanotises) (botany) Any of the genus Stephanotis of climbing asclepiadaceous shrubs
    399 bytes (99 words) - 23:48, 16 June 2017
  • See also: side, sìde, and -side Wikipedia has an article on: Side Wikipedia From Latin Side, from Ancient Greek Σίδη (Sídē) Side (geography, historical)
    1 KB (100 words) - 04:11, 8 June 2017
  • From Middle English bewteful, beautefull (“attractive to the eye, beautiful”), equivalent to beauty +‎ -ful. Displaced earlier sheen (from Middle English
    13 KB (308 words) - 21:54, 9 July 2017
  • cumlie From Middle English comly, cumly, cumlich, from Old English cymlīc, cȳmlīċ (compare Old English cȳme (“fine, exquisite”), from Proto-Germanic *kūmiz
    3 KB (243 words) - 03:45, 24 May 2017
  • cicinnus From Latin cincinnus (“a lock of hair”) cincinnus (plural cincinni) (botany), a type of monochasium on which the successive axes arise alternately
    890 bytes (140 words) - 01:45, 16 June 2017
  • Wikipedia has an article on: sceat Wikipedia From Old English sceatt. IPA(key): /ʃæt/ sceat (plural sceats) (numismatics) A small Anglo-Saxon coin
    1 KB (130 words) - 14:26, 8 June 2017
  • cyma + Latin rēcta (“straight”) (Received Pronunciation) enPR: sīʹmə rĕkʹtə, IPA(key): /ˈsaɪmə ˈɹɛktə/ cyma recta (plural cymae rectae or cymæ rectæ)
    3 KB (314 words) - 16:05, 24 May 2017
  • cyma + Latin inversa (“inverted”) (Received Pronunciation) enPR: sīʹmə ĭnvûrʹsə, IPA(key): /ˈsaɪmə ɪnˈvɜːsə/ cyma inversa (plural cymae inversae or cymæ
    2 KB (286 words) - 15:55, 28 July 2016
  • cyma + Latin reversa (“returned”) (Received Pronunciation) enPR: sīʹmə rĭvûrʹsə, IPA(key): /ˈsaɪmə ɹɪˈvɜːsə/ cyma reversa (plural cymae reversae or cymæ
    3 KB (326 words) - 16:05, 24 May 2017