Talk:고인돌

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

Please don't delete any part[edit]

This page will be used for the Wiktionary:Beer_parlour#Can someone else please be the bad guy talk. So refrain from editing this page for a week at least. Thanks. --KYPark 02:57, 23 May 2008 (UTC)

Nobody owns entries on Wiktionary. You can always access your version of the entry, here. You are of course welcome to make further improvements. -- Visviva 03:47, 23 May 2008 (UTC)

You are welcome here to discuss about the legitimacy of any part of the main page, from the original research and other perspectives. --KYPark 03:03, 23 May 2008 (UTC)

Here are the changes I would make: [1] Note that this does not discuss the origin of "dolmen," or any chance sound correspondences between languages; these are both completely irrelevant here.
Also note the use of the templates {{ko-sort}}, {{ko-noun}}, and {{ko-inline}}. These ensure that categories are sorted correctly, that entry display is consistent across all entries, and that Korean characters display correctly in all browsers. When you, a very experienced user, fail to use these basic templates, you create a mess of the sort that I am extremely tired of cleaning up. If you find these templates unsatisfactory, please explain why and I will do my best to improve them. -- Visviva 03:47, 23 May 2008 (UTC)
I am sorry to have failed to use those templates. I was not ignoring them. But you know that this is not the urgent agenda to me right now, and that I had been too long away from wikt edits to get accustomed to them. Anyway sorry.
I specially asked my original edit to remain as such for a week. I regret you deleted some part as "completely irrelevant here" too early for others to see and consider if it is problematic or irrelevant.
I also doubt why the deleted are so "completely irrelevant". All the on-going BP talks and my arguments may be almost reduced to this very question. I greatly regret you take that focal question too easily. Are you dictating or discussing? Isn't it a very very common practice to discuss any serious deletion in advance here? In the beginning, I asked Atelaes if such deletion without discussion isn't extremely nasty. He did not answer. Again this no answer is very rude, I fear. Will you all keep treating me so rude as this? I warn you your way of doing could do harm to Wiktionary! --KYPark 04:32, 23 May 2008 (UTC)

English in evolution[edit]

--KYPark 06:40, 2 June 2008 (UTC)

Noun[edit]

Revision as of 06:15, 23 May 2008
KYPark
(→Etymology - see also menhir)
Revision as of 18:37, 23 May 2008
Rodasmith
(terser etym, defn)
dolmen (plural: dolmens)
# a prehistoric megalith having a capstone supported by two or more upright stones. (Dolmens were usually covered with earth or smaller stones to form a barrow, though in many cases that covering has weathered away, leaving only the stone "skeleton" of the burial mound intact.)
dolmen (plural: dolmens)
# a prehistoric megalithic tomb consisting of a capstone supported by two or more upright stones, most having originally been covered with earth or smaller stones to form a barrow.
  • This new definition reasonably refined by friendly Rodasmith was used by Carl Daniels (11:52, 31 May 2008) to newly create Sino-Japanese 支石墓. This is a due evolution, as compared with a destructive revolution attempted by the adversely, twistedly or wickedly preoccupied to my great dismay. (added later) ---KYPark 10:29, 2 June 2008 (UTC)

Korean in degeneration[edit]

--KYPark 06:40, 2 June 2008 (UTC)

Photo[edit]

Revision as of 05:58, 23 May 2008
KYPark
(The photo taken at Ganghwado Korea)
Revision as of 06:46, 23 May 2008
Atelaes
m (Reverted edits by KYPark (Talk); changed back to last version by Visviva)
고인돌 (goindol, “dolmen”). The photo taken at Ganghwado, Korea.
고인돌 (goindol, “dolmen”).
  • Korean 고인돌 (goindol, “goindol”) may not exactly be the same as English dolmen. Then the photo should make it clear where it was taken. Anything should not go. It shows the northern or table type to the north of Ganghwado, Korea, hence a vital milestone, in contrast to the southern or go-board type. Explain why the caption should be so minimal.

Noun[edit]

Revision as of 05:58, 23 May 2008
KYPark
(The photo taken at Ganghwado Korea)
Revision as of 06:46, 23 May 2008
Atelaes
m (Reverted edits by KYPark (Talk); changed back to last version by Visviva)
고인돌 (goindol)
# A dolmen, a prehistoric megalith having a capstone supported by two or more upright stones. (Dolmens were usually covered with earth or smaller stones to form a barrow, though in many cases that covering has weathered away, leaving only the stone "skeleton" of the burial mound intact.)
고인돌 (goindol)
# A dolmen, a prehistoric megalith having a capstone supported by two or more upright stones.
  • Compare: #English in evolution
    The difference may simply lie in Atelaes' blind hostility vs. Rod's bright friendliness.

See also[edit]

Revision as of 05:58, 23 May 2008
KYPark
(The photo taken at Ganghwado Korea)
Revision as of 06:46, 23 May 2008
Atelaes
m (Reverted edits by KYPark (Talk); changed back to last version by Visviva)
* 온돌 (, ondol) hypocaust, Korean floor heating system or room, "having a capstone supported by two or more upright stones" like the goindol! * 온돌 (, ondol)
  • Should the See also items never be followed by any descriptive reason, Atelaes' deletion could be justified. So far, however, I have never imagined Wiktionary to be such a formality!

Etymology[edit]

Revision as of 13:07, 23 May 2008
KYPark
Current revision (15:12, 23 May 2008)
Stephen G. Brown
(No need to say that 고 is not like English go, nor 인 like English in, nor 돌 like English dole.)
From 고인 (goin, “supported”), adnominal form of 고이다 (goida, “to support”) + (dol, “stone”). Korean goindol and English dolmen share the same Roman syllable /dol/ by accident, meaning "stone" and "table" respectively. From 고인 (goin, “supported”), adnominal form of 고이다 (goida, “to support”) + (dol, “stone”).
  • Stephen's Edit summary is a great "laughing stock" in his stock phrase, hence perhaps such is his counter-edit itself, strongly preoccupied by hostility against me. Korean goindol has nothing whatsoever to do with English go, in, and dole. Please anyone advise me what he means by that comparison.
  • In a sense, Korean goindol is vitally compared with English dolmen. So readers may better know how the common /dol/ syllables are related to each other, e.g., by accident or by necessity. Stephen should explain why he nonetherless should delete it.
What do you mean by "share the same Roman syllable" ? What, if any, usefullness there is in comparing Korean dol and English *dol < Breton teol (which means table not stone) appearing exclusively inside the adopted compound term dolmen ? Looks to me that you're again trying to masquarede genetic relationship based on vague phoentic correspondence. --Ivan Štambuk 11:51, 23 May 2008 (UTC)
``Korean goindol and English dolmen share the same Roman syllable /dol/ by accident, meaning "stone" and "table" respectively.`` Ivan, you are very irresponsible to answer me without properly understanding the above single self-evident sentence. So are most others. So are most witch-hunters in Western history. So I called this talk the twisted or wicked witch-hunt party loud and clear, so convincingly from the beginning. So I blame you all for blaming me unjustifiably, without enough understanding and evidence beyond the reasonable doubt. At least on this occasion, you mistook my word and harassed me. I wonder if you are brave enough to apologize for this, and again to look for my weakest link you have to attack. Cheers. --KYPark 15:17, 23 May 2008 (UTC)