Talk:ae

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With a perfectly good quote from Robert Burns in 'Ae fond kiss' to support its usage, I can't see why this should be deleted. Guinevere50 17:27, 26 November 2011 (UTC)

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ae[edit]

The senses:

  • Country code for the United Arab Emirates.
  • At the age of; aged.
  • (mathematics) Almost everywhere.

The first one is obviously bad caps. The last one is already at a.e., where it belongs. The second one I think is incorrect as well. -- Prince Kassad 22:39, 4 January 2011 (UTC)

The second one is rubbish AFAICS; the third is duplicate; that leaves the first sense. Going by fr, perhaps this should be replaced with
{{also|Ae|AE}} {{only in|{{in appendix|ISO 639-1 language codes}}}}
This, that and the other (talk) 09:39, 6 November 2011 (UTC)

Anyway, I resolved this -- Liliana 17:30, 26 November 2011 (UTC)

Missing prons for the Scottish "one" sense?[edit]

Chambers 1908 lists only /eɪ/ and /jeɪ/ (translated from the non-IPA notation they used). Equinox 12:02, 21 October 2017 (UTC)

Are you sure their notation denotes a diphthong? Scottish English at least (and maybe Scots as well?) is kind of famous for having a monophthongal FACE vowel. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 12:07, 21 October 2017 (UTC)
The vowel is written a-overbar, and is the same given for "bay", "pay" etc. Equinox 12:08, 21 October 2017 (UTC)
My Scots resources are extremely limited, namely to a single dictionary, but it's quite a good one: The Concise Scots Dictionary (Aberdeen University Press 1985, editor-in-chief Mairi Robinson, →ISBN). It includes IPA transcription but does not usually indicate vowel length except where vowels are long in environments where you wouldn't expect it. The pronunciations given for ae (one) are: Shetland and northern East Central Scots /e/; southern East Central Scots and South-West Scots /je/; Southern Scots /jɛ/. In the introduction it says that vowels are long when final, so we can deduce that these are actually /eː/, /jeː/, /jɛː/, at least when the word is stressed. Shall I add those, since they can be sourced to a published dictionary? —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 13:38, 21 October 2017 (UTC)
Sure, thanks. Equinox 13:47, 21 October 2017 (UTC)