Talk:pentium

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Although this follows from deuterium and tritium, it doesn't seem to be used in the place of simply Hydrogen-5. Nadando 17:11, 12 October 2009 (UTC)

I’ve added the source whence I got this, though, as you say, it doesn’t seem to have caught on like protium, deuterium, and tritium have; that said, it may be just about attestable with the aid of Google Groups Search. It’ll be difficult given the predominance of Pentium. FWIW, pentium doesn’t exactly follow from protium, deuterium, and tritium — the latter are formed on Ancient Greek ordinal numbers (πρῶτος(prôtos, first), δεύτερος(deúteros, second), and τρίτος(trítos, third), respectively) + Latin -ium, whereas the former is formed from the Ancient Greek cardinal number πέντε(pénte, five) + Latin -ium. Consistency calls for something like *pemptium (from the ordinal form of πέντε(pénte), viz. πέμπτος(pémptos, fifth)), but there’s an absolute dearth of use thereof (for example, google books:pemptium yields only gibberish, phantom hits, and ten scannos of Pompeium). What that source gives as the term for 41H — tetriumseems more promising (u):Raifʻhār (t):Doremítzwr﴿ 23:20, 12 October 2009 (UTC)

RFV failed, entry deleted. I didn't bother keeping the citation, as it was only a mention, but if anyone wants it on the citations page, let me know. —RuakhTALK 20:42, 5 March 2010 (UTC)