User:Visviva/Medical/By links/B

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  1. balanism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      balanism (bal'-an-izm) [l&Xoyoi, acorn; pessary; the glans penis]. The application of a pessary or suppository.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bal'anism. The employment of a pessary or suppository.
  2. ballonnement - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ballonnement(fra/-JG«-mon(g)) [Fr.]. The ballooning or distending of a part for operative or diagnostic purposes.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ballonnement (bah-lon-maw') [Fr.]. Same as ballooning.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ballonnement (bah-lon-mawQ [Fr.]. Same as ballooning.
  3. balsamum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      balsamum (bawl'-sam-um) [balsam]. A balsam. b. dipterocarpi. See Curjun balsam.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      balsamum (bal'sam-um). Latin for balsam.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      balsamum (bal'sam-um). Latin for balsam.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bal'samum [L. balsamum; G. balsamon.] Balsam, balm. b. america'num, b. tolutamun. b. canaden'se, Canada balsam.* b. copai'vs, capaiba. b. peruvia'num (U.S. and Br.) balsam of Peru, a thick, dark brown liquid balsam obtained from Toluifera pereirtg, used as a healing application to wounds, b. toluta'num (U.S. and Br.), balsam of Tolu, a yellowish brown soft mass, obtained from Toluifera balsamum; employed as a stimulant expectorant, dose gr. 10-30 (0.6-2.0). b. tranquil'lans, soothing balsam, a preparation of the French Codex somewhat similar in composition and effect to oleum hyoscyami compositum (N.F.). b. traumat'icum, traumatic, Wade's, friars', or Turlington's balsam; benzoin 40, storax 12.8. balsam of Tolu 12 .8, balsam of Peru 6 .4, aloes 3.2, myrrh 3.2, angelica root 1.6, alcohol to make 400; employed in catarrhal conditions in doses of 15115-30 (1.0-2.0) and by inhalation, and formerly used as an application to wounds. b. vi'bo Hoffman'ni, mistura oleobalsamica (N.F.) r/>!' measure 4- ypaipetv to record]. A self-registering barometer.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      baromet'rograph. Barograph.
  4. baryecoia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      baryecoia (bar-e-ek-oi'-ah) ... hardness of hearing]. Hardness of hearing; partial deafness.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      baryecoia (bar"i-e-koi'ah) [Gr. p,,,,,•,,.,,aa\, Dulness of hearing.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      baryecoia (bar'e-e-koy'ah) [G. barylkoio.] Deafness, hardness of hearing.
  5. baryphonia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      baryphonia (bar-c-fo'-ne-ah) [bary-; ^wn}, a voice]. A heaviness or difficulty of speech.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      baryphonia (bar-e-fo'ne-ah) [Gr. Bapln heavy , ,..;<-,» voice). Difficult utterance of speech.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      barypho'nia [G. barys, heavy, + phoni, voice.] i. A deep voice, a. Barylalia.
  6. barythymia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      barythymia (bar-e-tki'-me-ah) [bary-; 06pot. mind]. A melancholy, gloomy, or sullen state of mind.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      barythymia (bar-e-thim'e-ah) [Gr. flapln heavy + Svfioi mind). Melancholia.
  7. basculation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      basculation (bas-ku-la'-shun) [Fr., basculer, to swing], i. The movement by which retroversion of tht uterus is corrected when the fundus is pressed upward and the cervix drawn downward. 2. See bascule movement.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      basculation (bas-ku-la'shun) [Fr. basculer to swing]. Replacement of a retroverted uterus by swinging it into its place.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bascula'tion [Fr. basculer, to swing.] i. The replacement of a retroverted uterus by a sort of seesaw movement. 3. Systolic recoil of the heart.
  8. basial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      basial (ba'-se-al) [60515]. Relating to a base or to the baston.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      basial (ba'se-al). Pertaining to the basion.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      basial (ba'se-al). Pertaining to the basion.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ba'sial. Relating to the basion.
  9. basichromatin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      basichromatin (ba$-€-kror-mat-in) (basi-; xp&po. color). According to Heidenhain, that portion of the nuclear reticulum stained by basic aniline dyes.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      basichromatin (ba-sik-ro'mat-in). The basophil portion of the chromatin of a cell.
  10. basophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      basophobia (bas-o-fo'-be-ah) [basis; ^60ot, fear]. Complete inability to walk or stand erect, due to emotional causes. The muscles concerned are not appreciably impaired.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      basopho'bia. Basiphobia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      basophobia (ba-so-fo'be-ah) [Gr. 0dv-n/ii>v fear). • Morbid fear of walking.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      basopho'bia. Basiphobia.
  11. bedlamism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      bedlamism (bed'-lam-izm) {bedlam}. Insanity.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      bedlamism (bed'lam-izm). Insanity.
  12. behen - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      behen (be-hen') [Fr. behen]. A popular name of various herbs and plants of the genera Stafice, Centau'rea, Sile'ne, etc.
  13. benzidin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      benzidin (ben'zid-in). A colorless, crystalline compound, (NHj.C,H4.C,H,.NHj), formed by the action of acids on hydrazobenzene: used as a test for blood. See benzidin test, under test.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      ben'zidin. A base, Nh2.g,h5.g>hb.nh2, forming silvery laminar crystals readily soluble in hot water and alcohol.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      benzidin (ben'zid-in). A colorless, crystalline compound, (NH?.C,H1.C,H,.NHJ), formed by the action of acids on hydrazobenzene: used as a test for blood. See bemidin test, under lesl.
  14. bergenin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      bergenin'(6«r'-jen->Ti) [Bergenia, a genus of plants], CeHiOiHiO. A bitter, crystalline substance, obtained from various species of saxifrage, melting at 140° C. It is said to be a nerve tonic, with action Intermediate between that of salicylic acid and of quinine.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      bergenin (ber^jen-in). A crystalline nerve tonic principle from plants of the genus Saxif'raga.
  15. beta-naphthol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      be"ta-naph'thol. A buff-colored powder, or yellowish scales, of a sharp, stinging taste, a phenol occurring in coal-tar and also prepared from naphthalin. Used as an intestinal antiseptic. [U. S. Ph. and Br. Ph.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      beta-naphthol (be-tah-nafthol). See naphthol. b. benzoate. Same as btntonophthol. b. bismuth, a brown, powdery mixture of bismuth oxid. 8 parts, with beta-naphthol, 2 parts. It is insoluble in water, and is used as an intestinal antiseptic. Dose, 15-45 gr. (1-3 gm.). b. carbonate, an ester in colorless, shining scales: an intestinal antiseptic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      beta-naph'thol (U.S. and Br.). A buff colored powder or yellowish scales, a phenol occurring in coal-tar and also prepared from naphthalene; employed internally as an intestinal antiseptic in doses of gr. 1-5 (0.06-0.3), and externally in scabies, eczema, and certain other skin diseases, b.-n. sal'icylate, naphthyl salicylate.
  16. betacism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      betacism (be'-las-itm) [beta, 0. the second letter of the Greek alphabet]. The too-frequent use of the
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      betacism (be'tah-sizm) [Gr. /3r)ra the letter B]The excessive use of the fr-sound in speaking.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      betacism (be'tah-sizm) [Gr. Br)ra the letter (ft. The excessive use of the S-sound in speaking.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      be'tacism [G. beta, the second letter of the alphabet.] A defect in speech in which the sound of b is given to other consonants.
  17. betol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      betol (be'tol). A white powder, CH.fOHKOj.Ckjit, a derivative of beta-naphthol. It is nearly insoluble in water, but soluble in 3 parts of boiling alcohol or ether. It is an intestinal antiseptic and antizymotic, and is useful in rheumatism and cystitis and in putrid intestinal diseases. Dose 10-20 gr. (0.648-1.20 gm.). Called also salinaphthol and naphlhalol.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      betol (be'tol). A white powder, CtH,(OH)CO,.i ! 1 . a derivative of beta-naphthol. It is nearly insoluble in water, but soluble in 3 parts of boiling alcohol or ether. It is an intestinal antiseptic and antizymotic, and is useful in rheumatism and cystitis and in putrid intestinal diseases. Dose 10-20 gr. (0.648-1.29 gm.). Called also salinaphthol and naphthalol.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      be'tol. Naphthyl salicylate.
  18. bibasic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      bibasic (bi-ba'-sik) [bi-; basis, a base]. Having two hydrogen atoms replaceable by bases, as certain acids; dibasic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      bibasic (bi-ba'sik). Doubly basic; having two hydrogen atoms that may be replaced by bases.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      bibasic (bi-ba'sik). Doubly basic; having two hydrogen atoms that may be replaced by bases.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      biba'sic. Noting an acid having two hydrogen atoms replaceable by bases to form salts.
  19. biberin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      biberin (bib'-ur-in). Same as bebeerin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      biberin (bi-be'rin). Same as bebeerin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      biberin (bi-be'rin). Same as bebeerin.
  20. bilobular - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      bilobular Uri-lob'-u-lar) [bi. two; lobulus. lobule]. Having two lobules.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bilob'ular [L. bi-, two, + lobulus, lobule.] Having two lobules.
  21. binotic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      binotic (bin-o'-lik). See birtaural.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      binotic (bin-ot'ik) [L. bint two + Gr. ovs ear). Pertaining to both ears.
  22. biogen - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      biogen (bi'-o-jen) [bio-; ytrrif, to produce), x. See protyl. 2. See bioplasm. 3. See magnesium dioxide.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      biogen (bi'o-jen) [Gr. Bios life + ya>vav to generate). 1. Same as biophore. 2. A proprietary preparation of magnesium dioxid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      biogen (bi'o-jen) [Gr. Plot life i yevrar to generate], i. Same as biophore. 2. A proprietary preparation of magnesium dioxid.
  23. bionergy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      bionergy (bi-on'-er-je) (bio-; Irtar, work]. Lifeforce; force exercised in the living organism.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      bionergy (bi-on'er-je) [Gr. plot life 4 1/j-yw work]. Life-force; the force exercised in the living organism.
  24. biophysiography - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      biophysiography (bi-o-fiz-e-og'-ra-fe) (bio-; Gbra, nature; -ypi^uv, to write]. Descriptive or structural biology; organography, as distinguished from biophysiology.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      biophysiog'raphy [G. bios, life, + physis, nature, + grapho, I write.] The branch of biology which deals with the natural history of living organisms; de criptive biology.
  25. bioplasm - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      bioplasm (bi'-n-fla:m) [bio-; r\taiia, form). Anyliving matter, but especially germinal or forming matter; matter possessing reproductive vitality.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      bioplasm. The living substance. Same as protoplasm. [Gr., bios, life, + plasma, formed matter.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      bioplasm (bi'o-plazm) [Gr. plot life 4 ir\annn plasm), i. The primitive matter out of which organized tissues are composed. 2. The more essential or vital part of protoplasm, contrasted with the paraptasm. 3. A proprietary preparation used as a nerve tonic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bi'oplasm [G. bios, life, + plasma, thing formed.] Protoplasm, especially in its relation to living processes and development.
  26. bioplast - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      bioplast (bi'-o-plast) [bioplasm]. A mass or cell of bioplasm that is a unit of living matter.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      bi'oplast. Of Beale "a very minute living particle."
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      bioplast (bi'o-plasO. An independently existing mass of living matter.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bi'oplast [G. bios, life, + plastos, formed.] An ameboid cell, leucocyte, lymphocyte.
  27. biosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      biosis (bi-o'-sis) [0bx, life]. Life; vitality.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bio'sis [G. biosis, life.] Life in general.
  28. biostatics - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      biostatics (bi-o-stat'-iks) [bio-; vrarucfe. causing to stand], i. Static biology; the science of the determinate parts of biology, including anatomy and the physics of the living body. 2. Vital statistics.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      biostat'ics [G. bios, life, + statikos, causing to stand.]
  29. biotomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      biotomy (bi-ot'-o-me) [bio-; rkn*M. to cut]. Vivisection.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      biotomy (bi-ot'o-me) [Gr. film life + Tom a cutting]. 1. The study of animal and plant structure by dissection. 2. Vivisection.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      biot'omy. See vivisection. [Gr., bios, life, -f- temnein, to cut.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      biotomy (bi-ot'o-me) [Gr. /Sioi life + ro/ii) a cutting], i. The study of animal and plant structure by dissection. 2. Vivisection.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      biot'omy [G. bios, life, + toml, a cutting.] Vivisection.
  30. bipp - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      bipp. See Morison's method, under method.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      bipp. See Morison's method, under method.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bipp [ftismuth-«odoform-£araffin-/>aste.] A name given by Rutherford Morison to a mixture of one part bismuth, two parts iodoform, and one part paraffin, blended to form a paste; employed as an antiseptic application to wounds previously cleaned and dried.
  31. bisalt - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      bisalt (bi'-salt). See toll, acid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      bisalt (bi'salt). An acid salt.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      bi'salt. See acid salt, under salt.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      bisalt (bi'salt). An acid salt.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bi'salt. An acid salt.*
  32. bismuthyl - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      bismuthyl (biz'-mu-lhilt. BiO. A univalent radical, b. bromide. See bismuth oxybromide. b.. chloride.ir'-tn~it) [bi-; rbfrrapov, tartar]. Any tartrate in which only one replaceable hydrogen atom has been replaced by a base.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      bitar'trate. An acid, or hydric tartrate; so-called because it contains twice as much of the tartaric acid radicle in proportion to the base as the corresponding normal tartrate. [Lat., bitartras.1
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      bitartrate (bi-tar'trSt) Any tartrate with twice the amount of acid contained in a normal salt.
  33. biurate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      biurate (bi-u'-ral). An acid urate; a urate containing twice as much of the uric-acid constituent as an ordinary urate.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      biurate (bi-u'rat). A neutral salt of uric acid.
  34. biventer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      biventer (bi-ven'-ler) [ti-; center, a belly]. I. Having two bellies, as a muscle. 2. A digastric muscle. b. cerricis, the inner portiop of the complexus muscle, b. maxilla;, the digastric muscle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      biventer (bi'ven-ter) [L. bi two + ven'ter belly]. A part or organ (as a muscle) with two bellies. See muscles, table of.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      biventer (bi'ven-tcr) [L. bi two + ren'ter belly). A part or organ (as a muscle) with two belliesSee muscles, table of.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      biven'ter [L. hi-, two, + venter, belly.] Two-bellied, digastric; noting several muscles, b. cervi'cis, inner portion of the complexus, musculus* spinalis capitis. b. mandlb'uUe, musculus digastricus.
  35. blastemic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      blastemic (blas-trm'-ik) fflXatrrr'ii • ,;•, to germinate]. Relating to blastema; rudimentary; bioplasmic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      blastem'ic. Relating to the blastema.
  36. blastid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      blastid (Nas'-tid) (/SXaarAj. a germ]. In embryology, a very small clear spot on the fecundated ovum marking the place of the nucleus or cytoblast.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      blas'tid [G. blastos, germ.] The clear space in the impregnated ovum marking the site of the nucleus.
  37. blastochyle - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      blastochyle (blas'-to-Hl) [blasto-; xiOuit, juice]. The colorless fluid in the blastodermic vesicles.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      blastochyle (blas'to-kil) [Gr. BXaorot germ + X«Xin juice]. The fluid contained in the blastocele.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      blas'tochyle. The clear or shiny liquid of the blastodermic vesicle. [Gr., blartta. sprout, -f- chflos, juice.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      blastochyle (blas'to-kll) [Gr. 0Xaarrfc germ + XuXot juice). The fluid contained in the blastocele.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      blastochyle (blas'to-kfl) [G. blastos, germ, + chyloi, juice.] The blastocelic fluid.
  38. blastodisk - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      blastodisk (blas'to-disk) [Gr. BXaordt germ + Hokos disk]. A disk or mass that caps one pole of the yolk.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      blastodisk (blas'to-disk) [Gr. ff^aarirs germ + »<',.,-,'.•. disk]. A disk or mass that caps one pole of the yolk.
  39. blastogenic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      blastogenic (blas-to-jen'ik). Originating in the germ or germ-cell. ■
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      blastogenic (blas-to-jen'ik). Originating in the germ or germ-cell.
  40. blastophthoria - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      blastophthoria (blas-tof-tho're-ah) [Gr. BXaoro germ + ipBopa corruption]. Degeneration of th germ-celis from poisoning by lead, alcohol, syphilid etc.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      blastophthoria (blas"tof-tho'rl-ah) [G. blastos, germ, + phthora, corruption.] Degeneration of the germ cells as a result of poisoning by syphilis, lead, alcohol, opium, etc.
  41. blastotomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      blastotomy (blas-tot'o-me). Same as blastome atomy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      blastotomy (blas-tot'o-me). Same as blastomerotomy.
  42. blennoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      blennoid (blen'-oid) [blenno-; tltoi. form]. Resembling mucus; myxoid: muciform; mucoid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      blennoid (blen'oid) [Gr. 0\tmot mucus -f tl&ot form]. Resembling mucus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      blenn'oid [G. blfnnos, mucus, + eidos, resemblance.] Mucoid, resembling mucus.
  43. blennorrhagia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      blennorrhagia (blen-or-a'-je-ah) [blenno-; favriiv&i. to burst forth), i. An excessive mucous discharge. 2. Gonorrhea.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      blennorrhagia (blen-o-ra'je-ah) [Gr. /JX&vot mucus + fayvvvaL to break forth], i. Any discharge of mucus. 2. Gonorrhea.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      blennorrha'gia [G. blennos, mucus, + -rhagia.] A profuse blennorrhea.
  44. blennorrhagic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      blennorrhagic (blen-c-raj'ik). Pertaining to or of the nature of blennorrhagia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      blennorrhagic (blen-o-raj'ik). Blennorrheal.
  45. blennorrhea - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      blennorrhea (blen-or-e'-ah) [blenno-; /Mi, a flow]. Same as blennorrhagio. *
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      blennorrhea (blen-or-e'ah) [Gr. /JXivvot mucus + I'min flow]. A free discharge from the mucous surfaces, especially a gonorrheal discharge from the urethra or vagina; gonorrhea, b. adulto rum, gonorrheal ophthalmia, b. alveola ris, pyorrhoea alveolaris. inclusion b., conjunctivitis of the newborn caused bv Chlamydo7.oa. b. neonato rum. ophthalmia neonatorum. Stoerk's b., blennorrhea with profuse chronic suppuration, producing hypertrophy of the mucosa of the nose, pharynx, and larynx.
  46. blepharoplast - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      blepharoplast (blrf'-ar-o-plast) [blepharo-; ... to form). An individualized centrosome, found la certain protozoa, such as trypanosoma.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bleph'aroplast [G. blefharon, eyelid, + plastos, formed.] A minute mass of chromatin formed from the nucleus in certain protozoa, or forming the base of a flagellum, acting as a center for movement of the organism; basal granule, micronucleus, motor or locomotor nucleus.
  47. blind-gut - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      blind-gut (blind'gut). The cecum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      blind-gut (bllnd'gut). The cecum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      blind-gut. Cecum.
  48. blind-spot - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      blind-spot (blind'spot). A spot on the retina where the optic nerve enters, and which is not sensitive to the light.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      blind-spot. That portion of the retina insensitive to light, because it is the point of entry of the optic nerve fibers. The optic disk.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      blind-spot (blind'spot). A spot on the retina where the optic nerve enters, and which is not sensitive to (he light.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      blind-spot. Physiological scotoma, the point of entrance of the optic nerve into the retina.
  49. boldo - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      boldo (bol'-do). See boldus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      boldo.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bol'do (N.F.). The leaves of Boldu boldus or Pcumus boldus, an evergreen shrub of Chile; employed in hepatic troubles and in genitourinary inflammations in doses of 154 (0.25) of the N.F. fluidextract.
  50. bone-setter - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      bone-setter (bon'set-er). An unauthorized person who professes skill in treating fractures and dislocations.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bone'-setter. An empiric who claims the natural power of reducing old dislocations, relieving ankylosis, and setting fractures.
  51. bone-wax - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      bone-wax. See Moorhofs b.-w.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      bone-wax. See under wax.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bone-wax. A mixture of iodoform, 40, spermaceti, 30, and oil of sesame, 30; used in filling bone cavities, by Mosetig*-Moorhof's method.
  52. bonelet - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      bonelet (bon'-lct). See ossicle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      bonelet (bon'lct). An ossicle or small bone.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bone'let. Ossicle.
  53. boral - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      boral (bo'~ral). See aluminum borotarlrate.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      bo'ral. Aluminum borotartrate (proprietary).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      boral (bo'ral). Aluminum borotartrate: used as an astringent and antiseptic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bo'ral. Borotartrate of aluminum, antiseptic and astringent.
  54. borine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      borine (bo'-ren). i. A compound of i atom of boron and 3 atoms or 3 molecules of a univalent radical. 2. A proprietary antiseptic said to contain boric acid and aromatic stearoptens.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bo'rine. Trade name of a preparation said to consist largely of boracic acid with aromatic substances.
  55. borism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      borism (bo'-rizm). Poisoning with boric acid or borax.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      borism (bo'rizm). Poisoning by a boron compound.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bo'rism. Symptoms caused by the ingestion of borax or any compound of boron.
  56. boroglyceride - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      boroglyceride (bo-ro-Rlis'*er-ld). See boroglycerin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      boroglyceride (bo-ro-glis'er-id). Boroglycerin.
  57. bothrium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      bothrium (both're-um). A sucker, such as that on the head of a tapeworm.
  58. botryoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      botryoid (bot're-oid) [Gr. Boron bunch of grapes -f- cfoos" form]. Resembling a bunch of grapes.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      botryoid (bot're-oid) [Gr. fitrrp\n bunch of grapes
  59. boulimia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      boulimia (boo-lim'e-ah). Bulimia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      boulimia (boo-lim'J-ah) [G. bous, ox, + limos, hunger.] Bulimia, hyperorexia, a voracious appetite.
  60. bovista - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      bovista (bo-vis'tah) [L.]. The fungus, Lycoper1don bovis'ta. It is styptic and nervine: its use is mainly homeopathic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bovis'ta. A fungus, Lycoperdon bovista, puffball, formerly called fungus chirurgorum, employed locally as a styptic.
  61. bovril - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      bovril (bov'ril). A proprietary preparation of meat extract, glucose, and alcohol.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bo'vril. Trade name of a preparation containing meat extract, glucose and alcohol.
  62. brachiocephalic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      brachiocephalic (bra-ke-o-sef-al'ik) Relating to both arm and head.
  63. brachycardia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      brachycardia [brak-e-karMI-ah) [G. brachys, short, + kardia, heart.] Bradycardia.
  64. brachycephalism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      brachycephalism (brak-e-sef'al-izm). Shortness of the head; see brachycephalic,
  65. brachydactylia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      brachydactylia (brak-e-dak-til'I-ah) [G. brachys, short, + daklylos, finger.] Shortness of the fingers.
  66. brachymetropia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      brachymetropia (brak-e-me-tro'pl-ah) [G. brachys, short, + metron, measure, + dps, eye.] Myopia.
  67. bradylogia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bradylo'gia [G. bradys, slow, + logos, word.] Bradyarthria.
  68. bradypepsia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bradypep'sia [G. bradys, slow, + pepsis, digestion.] Slowness of digestion.
  69. brayera - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      braye'ra (N.F.). Cusso. kousso, the dried female inflorescence of Hagenia abyssinica (Brayera anthelmintica), a tree of the elevated region of Abyssinia, employed as a teniacide in doses of gr. 240 (15.0), or 5 8 (250.0) of the N.F. infusion.
  70. bregmatic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bregmat'ic. Relating to the bregma.
  71. brisement - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      brisement (brez-mon(g)) [Fr.]. A breaking or rupture, b. force, the forcible breaking up of structures causing ankylosis of a joint.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      brisement (brez-mawO [Fr. " crushing"]. The breaking up of anything, as of an ankylosis. b. force, the breaking up of a bony ankylosis by force.
  72. bromal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      bromal (brCBn. CHO. Tribromaldehyde, analogous to chloral, and produced by the action of bromine on alcohol. It is a colorless, oily fluid, of a penetrating odor and sharp, burning taste, boiling at I72°-I73° C.j it has been used in medicine, having properties similar to those of chloral. b. hydrate, CBn. CHO+Hip, a fluid of oily consistence, having a structure similar to that of chloral hydrate, but more irritating and narcotic than the latter. It is used as a hypnotic and in epilepsy. Dose 1-5 gr. (0.065-0.32 Cm.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      bromal (bro'mal). Tribromaldehyd, CBrjCHO, a colorless, oily, poisonous liquid produced by the action of bromin on alcohol. It is used as a hypnotic and anodyne, and externally as an irritant. Dose, 1-5 min. (0.066-0.333 c.c.) in a capsule, b. hydrate, a cp'stalline substance, CjHBrj(OH)j. It is an irritant hypnotic, more powerful than chloral hydrate, for which it is used in chorea and epilepsy. Dose, 1-5 gr. (0.0660333 Km.).
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      bro'mal. Tribromaldehyd, BrsCCHO. A colorless, oily liquid, of a burning taste and penetrating odor; used as a hypnotic. See chloral, b. hydrate. A crystalline substance, CBr«.CH(.OH)i. analogous to chloral hydrate, formed by the union of b. with water; decomposed by alkalis with the production of bromoforra. It has been used in epilepsy, chorea, and the pains of tabes dorsal's. [Bromin + aldchyd.l
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bro'mal. A thick oily liquid prepared by passing bromine through absolute alcohol and distilling; hypnotic and antispasmodic in doses of gr. 2-5 (o. i i-o. 3). b. hy'drate, a white crystalline powder with pungent taste, made by mixing anhydrous bromal with water; hypnotic in doses of gr. 1-5 (0.06-0.3).
  73. bromamide - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      bromamide (brcf-mam-id) [brom-; amide]. A bro
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bromamide (bro'ma-mld). Tribromaniline hydrobromide, occurs in colorless, tasteless, acicular crystals; antipyretic, analgesic, antirheumatic, in doses of gr. 7$—10 (0.5-0.6).
  74. bromated - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      bromated (bra1-ma-ted). Impregnated with bromine.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      bromated (bro'ma-ted). Combined with or containing bromin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      bromated (bro'ma-ted). Combined with or containing bromin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bro'mated. Mixed with bromine or any of its compounds.
  75. bromatology - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      bromatology (bro-mat-ol'-o-je) \fpdita, food; \tyot, a science]. The science of fond-1.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      bromatology (bro-mat-ol'o-je) [(lr. BpSip,a food + XtVyos treatise]. The science of foods and dietetics.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      bromatology (bro-mat-ol'o-je) [Gr. BpCiita. food -f ,\o, m treatise]. The science of foods and dietetics.
  76. bromelin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      bromelin (bro'-mel-in) \Bromelia, a genus of plants]. A digestive principle, allied to trypsin, found in the juice of pineapples. It will digest 1500 times its weight of proteids.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      bromelin (bro-mcl'in) [L. brome'lia pineapple], A ferment like trypsin, from pineapple-juice.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      bromelin (bro-mel'in) [L. bromtflia pineapple]. A ferrm-nt like trypsin, from pineapple-juice.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bro'melin. A digestive ferment obtained from pineapple-juice.
  77. bromidia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      bromidia (bro-miii'-e-ah). A proprietary hypnotic and anodyne.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      bromidia (bro-mid'e-ah). A proprietary hypno and anodyne preparation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      bromidia (bro-mid'e-ah). A proprietary hypnotic and anodyne preparation.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bromid'ia. Trade name of a preparation recommended as an hypnotic and nerve sedative.
  78. bromidin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      bromidin (bro'mid-in). A hypnotic preparati of chloral hydrate, extract of cannabis, an^ c tract of hyoscyamus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      bromidin (bro'mid-in). A hypnotic preparation of chloral hydrate, extract of cannabis, and extract of hyoscyamus.
  79. bromism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bro'mism. Chronic poisoning by bromine or any of its salts; the main symptoms are headache, mental inertia, occasionally violent delirium, muscular weakness, cardiac depression, an acneiform eruption, a foul breath, and anemia.
  80. bromoformin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      bromoformin (bro-mo-for'-min). Bromethylate of hexamethylene tetramine; it is used as a sedative.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      bromoformin (bro-mo-for'min). Same as bromalin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bro"mofor'min. Hexamethylene tetramine bromethylate, bromalin.*
  81. bromography - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      bromography (bro-mog'-ra-fe). Same as bromatography,
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bromog'raphy. Bromatography.
  82. bromoseltzer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      bromoseltzer (bro-mo-stlt'-ter). A proprietary headache remedy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      bromoseltzer (bro-mo-selt'zer). A proprietary remedy for headache, etc.
  83. bronchia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      bronchia (brong'-kt-oh) [Pptyxot, the windpipe]. The bronchial tubes, especially those that are smaller than the two bronchi.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      bronchia (brong'ke-ah) [L.; Gr. ffp6yx']- Bronchial tubes smaller than the bronchi and larger than the bronchioles.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bronchia (brong'ke-ah) [G. pi. of bronchion, dim. of bronchos, trachea.] The bronchial tubes,
  84. bronchium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      bronchium (brong'-ke-um) 11..; pi. bronchia], A bronchial tube.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      bronchium (brong'ke-um), pi. bron'chia [L.]One of the subdivisions of a bronchus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      bronchium (brong'ke-uin), pi. brotfckia |1..J. One of the subdivisions of a bronchus.
  85. bronchocele - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      bronchocele (.brong'-ko-sll [broncho-; ic^Xij, a tumor). Really a tumor of a bronchus, but generally signifying goiter, b., aerial. See afrocelt.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      bronchocele (brong'ko-sel) [Gr. fiooyxo* windpipe + mJXi7 tumor]. See goiter, cystic b., goiter containing cysts.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      bronchocele (bron'ko-sel). Another name for goiter. [Gr., brogchos, trachea, -f- kele, tumor.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      bronchocele (brong'ko-se'I) [Gr. /Spoyxos windpipe + fc>j.Vi; tumor]. See goiter, cystic b., goiter containing cysts.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bronchocele (brong'ko-sel) [G. bronchos, windpipe, + kill, tumor.] Goiter, especially cystic goiter.
  86. bronchophony - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      bronchophony (brong-kof'o-ne) [Gr. ffpdyxos airpassage + ipuvh voice]. The sound of the voice as heard through the stethoscope applied over a healthy bronchus. Heftrd elsewhere, it indicates solidification of the lung tissue, pectoriloquous b., a bronchophony with an accompaniment of pectoriloquy, sniffling b., that which is accompanied with a sniffing sound, as of air
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      bronchophony (bron-kof'o-ne). The natural sound of the voice, heard when one auscults over the trachea or the bronchi. A similar sound is heard over consolidated lung, whispering b. A highpitched, tubular sound heard on auscultation when the patient whispers. [Gr., brogchos, a bronchus, + phone, the voice.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      bronchophony (brong-kof'o-nl). Exaggerated vocal resonance heard over a bronchus surrounded by consolidated lung tissue.
  87. bronchorrhea - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      bronchorrhea (brong-kor-e'ah) [Gr. ffpoyx0* air passage + iota flow]. Excessive discharge o mucus from the air-passages of the lungs.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      bronchorrhea (brong-kor-e'ah) [Gr. ,>>:.-. v>; airpassage + ioio flow). Excessive discharge of mucus from the air-passages of the lungs.
  88. bronchostenosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      bronchostenosis (brong-ko-stc-no'-sis) [broncho-; ffTa>6i, narrow]. Contraction of a bronchus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      bronchostenosis (brong"ko-sten-o'sis) [G Ppoyxot bronchus + orercixnt stricture). Stri ture or abnormal diminution of the caliber of bronchial tube, spasmodic b., spasmodic coi traction of the walls of the bronchi.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      bronchostenosis (brong"ko-sten-c.'sis) [Gr. 0P°7X°* bronchus -f ffTo-uxrtt stricture]. Stricture or abnormal diminution of the caliber of a bronchial tube, spasmodic b., spasmodic contraction of the walls of the bronchi.
  89. buccellation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      buccellation (buk-sel-a'shun) [L. buccdla'tio, from buccel'la morsel]. The arrest of hemorrhage by a pad of lint.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      buccellation (buk-scl-a'shun) [L. buccella'lio, from bunrl'la morsel]. The arrest of hemorrhage by a pad of lint.
  90. buccolabial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      buccolabial (buk-o-la'be-al). Pertaining to the cheek and lip.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      buccolabial (buk-o-la'be-al). Pertaining to the cheek and lip.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      buccola'bial [L. bucca, cheek, + labium, lip.] Relating to both cheek and lip.
  91. buyo - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      buyo (boo'yo). The Philippine Island name for betel. See betel, b. cancer. See cancer. '