User:Visviva/Medical/By links/E

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  1. ecchondroma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ecchondroma (ek-on-dra'-mah) [in, out; ,
  2. ecchondrosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ecchondrosis (ck-on-dro'-sis) [ecchondroma; pi., ecchondroses], A cartilaginous outgrowth.
  3. ecchymoma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ecchymoma (ek-e-mo'-mak) [i\. out; -,'«•'•-. juice; Apa. tumor: pi., ecchymomata], A tumor-like swelling composed of extravasated blood.
  4. ecchymotic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ecchymotic (ek-e-mof-ik) [ecchymosis]. Relating to or resembling an ecchymosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ecchymotic (ek-e-mot'ik). Relating to an ecchymosis. eccoprotic (ek-o-prot'ik) [G. ek, out, + copras,
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ecchymotic (ek-e-mot'ik). Relating to an ecchymosis. eccoprotic (ek-o-prot'ik) [G. ek, out, + copras,
  5. eccrinology - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      eccrinology (rk-rin-ul'-o-je) [Itplnir. to secrete; X6>ot. science]. The science of secretion, including its physics, physiology, and pathology.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      eccrinology (e-krin-ol'o-jl) [G. ekkrind, I secrete, +
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      eccrinology (e-krin-ol'o-jl) [G. ekkrind, I secrete, +
  6. eccrisis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ec'crisis [G. separation.] i. The removal of waste
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ec'crisis [G. separation.] i. The removal of waste
  7. eccritic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      eccritic (ek-rit'-ik) [ktptrufa, secretive]. i. A medicine promoting excretion. 2. Promoting excretion.
  8. ecderon - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ecderon (ek'-der-on) [it, out ;<<
  9. echinococcus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      echinococcus (ck-in-o-kok'-us) [t\lm. a hedgehog; x&cKot, a berry), i. The scolex or larval stage of the Tmia echinococcus. a. Hydatid. e.-cyst. See cyst, echinococcus.
  10. echinulate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      echinulate (c-kin'-u-lat) [rfhitiulii*. dim. of rrhinus. a hedgehog). I. Beset with prickles of small size. 2. Bacterial cultures showing spinous projections.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      echinulate (S-kin'u-lat) [L. echinulus, dim. of echinus, hedgehog.] Noting a bacterial growth along the line of inoculation, having lateral spinous projections; see cut under culture, B, 3.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      echinulate (e-kin'u-Iat) [L. echi'nus hedgehog]. Having small prickles or spines; applied in bacteriology to cultures showing toothed or pointed outgrowths.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      echinulate (S-kin'u-lat) [L. echinulus, dim. of echinus, hedgehog.] Noting a bacterial growth along the line of inoculation, having lateral spinous projections; see cut under culture, B, 3.
  11. echoacousia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      echoacousia (ek-o-ah-koii'-st-nh) {echo; lutmiaal. hearing]. The subjective sensation of hearing echoes after sounds heard normally.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      echoacousia (ek"o-a-koo'sl-ah). A subjective disturbance of hearing in which a sound heard appears to be repeated.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      echoacousia (ek"o-a-koo'sl-ah). A subjective disturbance of hearing in which a sound heard appears to be repeated.
  12. echographia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      echographia (ek-o-graf'-e-ah) [echo; -,,;.1...'j,ir, to write). A form of aphasia in which printed or written questions submitted to the patient are copied without ability to comprehend the inquiry; also, in writing, the last word or letter is repeated.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      echographia (ek*o-graf1-ah). A form of agraphia in which one can write from dictation or copy but cannot do original writing.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      echographia (ek-o-gra'fe-ah) [Gr. ijx echo + ypaifnf to write). An aphasic condition in which
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      echographia (ek*o-graf1-ah). A form of agraphia in which one can write from dictation or copy but cannot do original writing.
  13. echopathy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      echopathy (ek-op'-alh-e) [fad, echo; unWoi, disease]. Any automatic and purposeless repetition of a word or sound heard or of an act seen.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      echopathy (S-kop'a-thl) [G. echo, echo, + pathos, suffering.] A neurosis in which the words or actions of another are imitated and repeated by the patient.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      echopathy (ek-op'ath-e) [Gr. fab echo + T&8m disease]. A nervous disease marked by the senseless repetition of words or actions.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      echopathy (S-kop'a-thl) [G. echo, echo, + pathos, suffering.] A neurosis in which the words or actions of another are imitated and repeated by the patient.
  14. echophony - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      echophony (ek-of'-o^ne) [echo; v'-.i.r,. voice]. An echo of a vocal sound in auscultation of the chest.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      echophony (ek-ofo-ne) [Gr. Axipwij voice]. An echo-h'ke sound heard immediately after a vocal sound on auscultation of the chest.
  15. ecraseur - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ecraseur (a-krah-zer') [Fr. (eraser, to crush.] A
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ecraseur (a-krah-zer') [Fr. " crusher"]. An instrument containing a chain or cord to be looped about a part and then tightened so as to divide the inclosed part.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ecraseur (a-krah-zer') [Fr. (eraser, to crush.] A
  16. ectad - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ectad (ek'-tad) [farot, external; ad, to]. On or toward the ectal part.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ec'tad [G. ektos, without + L. ad, to.] Outward.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ectad (ek'tad) (Gr. wi-As without]. Outward; the reverse of inward.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ec'tad [G. ektos, without + L. ad, to.] Outward.
  17. ectal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ectal (ef-tal) [see ectad]. At some surface or aspect farther from a supposed center than that with which a given object is compared; external; superficial.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ec'tal [G. ektos, without.] Outer, external.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      ec'tal. Pertaining to the exterior, especially of a cell. [Gr., ektos, out of.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ectal (ck'tal) [Gr. berin without]. Superficial or external.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ec'tal [G. ektos, without.] Outer, external.
  18. ectethmoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ectethmoid (ck:trth'-moid) [eclo-; ethmoid]. Either one <of the lateral cellular masses of the ethmoid bone.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ectethmoid (ekt-eth'moyd) [G. ektos, without.] One of the lateral masses of the ethmoid bone, ectoethmoid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ectethmoid (ekt-eth'moyd) [G. ektos, without.] One of the lateral masses of the ethmoid bone, ectoethmoid.
  19. ecthyma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ecthyma (ck-thi'-mah) [Ixdvpa, a pustule]. An inflammatory skin disease attended with an eruption of large, flat, superficial pustules. They vary in rize from a ten-cent to a twenty-five-cent piece, and are surrounded by a distinct inflammatory areola. The eruption appears, as a rule, on the legs and thighs where the hain are thick; It occurs in crops, and may persist for an indefinite period, e. gangrenosum, e., gangrenous, a form marked by the appearance of brown discolorations of the skin, usually surrounded by a halo; the center of these efflorescences rapidly becomes necrotic. It is due to bacillus pyxyaneus. e., syphilitic. See rupia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ecthy'ma [G. a pustule.] A dermatosis marked by the occurrence of ulcerating pustules due to infection; the lesion may be single but usually there are multiple ulcers of varying size. e. gangreeno'sum, dermatitis gangranosa infantum.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      ecthyma (ck-thi'mah). An ulcerative pustular lesion of the skin, resulting from infection. It is to be classed as a dermatological process rather than a distir.: disease. An infected abrasion of the skin, for example, forms an ecthymatoos ulcer, e. scrofulosum. Scrofulous e.; the form observed in scrofulous subjects. [Gr. ekthyma, from ekthycin, to break out.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ecthy'ma [G. a pustule.] A dermatosis marked by the occurrence of ulcerating pustules due to infection; the lesion may be single but usually there are multiple ulcers of varying size. e. gangreeno'sum, dermatitis gangranosa infantum.
  20. ectromelia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ectromelia (ek-tro-me'11-ah) [See ectromelus ] A congenital lack of one or more of the limbs.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ectromelia (ek-tro-me'le-ah). Absence of a limb or limbs.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ectromelia (ek-tro-me'11-ah) [See ectromelus ] A congenital lack of one or more of the limbs.
  21. ectrotic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ectrotic (ek-trot'ik) [G. ektrdlikos, relating to abortion. ] Abortive; preventing or arresting the development of a disease.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ectrotic (ek-trot'ik). Abortive; arresting the development of a disease.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ectrotic (ek-trot'ik) [G. ektrdlikos, relating to abortion. ] Abortive; preventing or arresting the development of a disease.
  22. edestin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      edestin (td-esf-in). The chief and characteristic protein of the seeds of sunflower, hemp, squash, and castor-oil bean.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      edes'tin. A globulin derived from the castor-oil bean, hemp-seed, and other seeds, soluble in neutral solutions but insoluble in water.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      edestin (e-des'tin). A pure crystalline protein obtained from hemp-seed, wheat, rye, etc. It is used in estimating the peptic index according to the method of Fuld.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      edes'tin. A globulin derived from the castor-oil bean, hemp-seed, and other seeds, soluble in neutral solutions but insoluble in water.
  23. effluve - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      effluve (ef-fluv'). A spray-like electric discharge.
  24. effumability - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      effumability (ef-u-ma-bti'-i-te). Capacity for volatilization.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      effumability (ef-u-ma-bil'it-c) [L. ex out + fu'mus smoke]. The property of being volatilized easily.
  25. ekiri - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ekiri (ek-e'-re). A severe type of infantile diarrhea occurring in Japan.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ekiri (e-ki'ri). An acute and fatal form of endemic diarrhea occurring in Japan.
  26. elain - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      elain (e-la'-in). See eleoptene.
  27. elasticin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      elasticin (el-as'-lis-in). See elastin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      elas'ticin. Elastin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      elasticin (e-las'tis-in). Same as elaslin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      elas'ticin. Elastin.
  28. elaterium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      elaterium (el-at-e'-re-um) [iXarfjfltot, driv ng away]. The dried sediment from the juice of the •quirting cucumber. Ecballium elaterium. It is a powerful hydragogue cathartic. Dose t gr. (0.008 Gm.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      elaterium (el-a-te'rl-um) [G. elaterios, driving.] (Br.) The dried sediment from the juice of the fruit of Ecballium elaterium, squirting cucumber; it is a hydragogue cathartic, used especially in renal dropsy, in doses of gr. $ (o.oi).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      elaterium (el-at-e're-um) [L.]. A deposit from the juice of Ecbal'lium elale'rium, a hydragogue cathartic and diuretic: it is used in dropsy, and as a revulsive in congestion of the brain. Dose, i-} gr. (0.01-0.016 gm.); of triturate. J gr. (0.05 gm.); of compound powder, J-s gr. (0.03-0.3 gm.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      elaterium (el-a-te'rl-um) [G. elaterios, driving.] (Br.) The dried sediment from the juice of the fruit of Ecballium elaterium, squirting cucumber; it is a hydragogue cathartic, used especially in renal dropsy, in doses of gr. $ (o.oi).
  29. elaterometer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      elaterometer (e-lat-er-om'-et-er) [fXar^p, a driver; iMTpcw. a measure]. An apparatus for determining the elasticity of gases.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      elaterometer (el-at-er-om'et-er). An instrument for measuring the elasticity of gases. [Lat., elateromelrum.]
  30. elecampane - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      elecampane (el-e-kam'-pan). See inula.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      elecampane (el-e-kam-pSn'). Inula, the root of Inula hclenium.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      elecampane (e!"e-kam-pan'). The In'via hele'nium, a composite-flowered plant: its root is a stimulant, antibechic, and tonic, and is used in dyspepsia, bronchitis, and amenorrhea.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      elecampane (el-e-kam-pSn'). Inula, the root of Inula hclenium.
  31. electrization - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      electrization (e-lek-triz-a'-shun) [electricity]. The application of electricity to the body, c., intragastric, electrotherapy practised by the introduction of an electrode into the stomach. Cf. electrode, deglutable.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      electriza'tion. i. The act of electrifying, a. Treatment by means of electricity.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      electrization (e-lek-triz-a'shun). i. See electrification. 2. The application of electricity to a body; in medicine, the tran>mission of an electrical current througi. the body or any portion of it.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      electrization (e-lek-tri-za'shun). The act of charging with or treatment by electricity, direct e., electrization by applying one electrode to a muscle or to its motor point, and the other to an indifferent point.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      electriza'tion. i. The act of electrifying, a. Treatment by means of electricity.
  32. electroanesthesia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      electroanesthesia (e-lek-tro-an-es-thf-K-ah) [electro-; AvataOwia, want of feeling]. I. Inability to perceive the sensation made by electricity upon the skin. 2. Local anesthesia induced by the introduction of anesthetizing substances into the tissues by means of the electric current without injury to the skin. It is called the cataphoretic method.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      electroanesthesia (e-lek"tro-an-es-the'zl-ah). Anesthesia produced by the LeDuc current.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      electroanesthesia (e-lek"tro-an-es-the'zl-ah). Anesthesia produced by the LeDuc current.
  33. electrocoagulation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      electrocoagulation (e-lek-tro-ko-ag-u-la'-shun). The destruction or hardening of tumors or tissues by coagulation induced by the passage of high-frequency currents.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      electrocoagulation (e-lek"tro-ko-ag-u-la'shun). The hardening of tumors and diseased tissues by the passage through them of high-frequency currents; diathermy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      electrocoagulation (e-lek"tro-ko-ag-u-la'shun). The hardening and destruction of a tumor by passing through it a high-frequency current.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      electrocoagulation (e-lek"tro-ko-ag-u-la'shun). The hardening of tumors and diseased tissues by the passage through them of high-frequency currents; diathermy.
  34. electrodiagnosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      electrodiagnosis (e-lek-tro-di-ag-no'-sis) [electro-; diagnosis]. Diagnosis by examining the reaction of the excitable tissues of the body by means of electric currents.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      electrodiagno'sis. Determination of the nature of a disease through observation of changes in electrical irritability.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      electrodiagnosis (e-lek"tro-di-ag-no'sis). The use of electricity in the diagnosis of diseases.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      electrodiagno'sis. Determination of the nature of a disease through observation of changes in electrical irritability.
  35. electrograph - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      electrograph (e-lek'-tro-graf). See skiagraph.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      electrograph (e-Iek'tro-graf). Same as skiagraph.
  36. electrography - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      electrography (e-lck-trog'-raf-e). i. Skiagraphy. . 2. Electrology.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      electrography (c-lek-trog'raf-e) [electricity + Gr. ypa to record]. The employment of the Rdntgen rays in skiagraphy.
  37. electrology - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      electrol'ogy. Science in relation to electricity.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      electrology (e-lek-trol'o-je) [electro- + Gr. \6yot science]. The science of the phenomena and properties of electricity.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      electrol'ogy. Science in relation to electricity.
  38. electrolyzer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      electrolyzer (e-lek'-tro-li-zer). See eleetrolistr.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      elec'trolyzer. An apparatus for the treatment of strictures, fibromata, etc., by electrolysis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      elec'trolyzer. An apparatus for the treatment of strictures, fibromata, etc., by electrolysis.
  39. electrophorus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      electrophorus (e-lek-trof'-or-us) [electro-; , to carry]. An instrument used to generate small quantities of static electricity.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      electroph'orus. Electrophore.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      electrophorus (c-lek-trof'o-rus). An apparatus for collecting static electricity by induction. [Gr., elektron, amber, + phoros, bearing.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      electroph'orus. Electrophore.
  40. electrosurgery - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      electrosur'gery. The use of electricity in surgery.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      electrosur'gery. The use of electricity in surgery.
  41. electrotherapeutics - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      electrotherapeutics (e-lck-tro-ther-ap-u*-tiks) [electro-; Btparela, treatment]. The science and art of the application of electricity for therapeutic purposes.
  42. elephantiasic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      elephantiasic (el"ef-an-te-as'ik). Pertaining to elephantiasis.
  43. eliminant - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      eliminant (e-lim'-in-ant) [eliminare. to expel]. I. Promoting elimination. 2. A drug causing elimination.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      eliminant (e-lim'i-nant) [L. elimincms; eliminare, to turn out of doors.] i. Evacuant promoting excretion or the removal of waste, a. An agent which increases excretion.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      eliminant (e-lim'in-ant). i. Causing an evacuation. 2. An evacuating remedy.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      eliminant (e-lim'i-nant) [L. elimincms; eliminare, to turn out of doors.] i. Evacuant promoting excretion or the removal of waste, a. An agent which increases excretion.
  44. elurophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      elurophobia (e-lu-ro-fo'be-ah). Same as eelurophobia.
  45. embole - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      embole (em'bo-le) [G. embole, insertion.] i. An operation for the reduction of a dislocation, a. Formation of the gastrula by invagination. 3. Enarthrosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      embole (cm'bo-le) [Gr. ,,:,i,>,\,} a throwing in), i. The reducing of a dislocated limb. 2. The process of invagination which transforms the archenteron into the primitive embryo.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      embole (em'bo-le) [G. embole, insertion.] i. An operation for the reduction of a dislocation, a. Formation of the gastrula by invagination. 3. Enarthrosis.
  46. embryectomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      embryectomy (em-bre-ek'-to-me) [embryo; ?<ro/iij. a cutting out). The surgical removal of the embryo, especially in extra-uterine pregnancy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      embryectomy (em-bri-ek'to-ml) [G. embryon, embryo, + eHome, excision.] The operative removal of the product of conception, especially in ectopic pregnancy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      embryectomy (em-bre-ek'to-me) [Gr. tufipvm' embryo + ikmnij excision]. Excision of the embryo in extra-uterine pregnancy.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      embryectomy (em-bri-ek'to-ml) [G. embryon, embryo, + eHome, excision.] The operative removal of the product of conception, especially in ectopic pregnancy.
  47. embryoctony - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      embryoctony (em-bre-ok'-to-ne) [see embryoctonic]. The destruction of the living fetus; the procurement of abortion.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      embryoc'tony [G. embryon, embryo, fetus, + kteino, I destroy.] Feticide, taking the life of the product of conception any time before birth.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      embryoctony (em-bre-ok'to-ne) [Gr. ;;,,;,.,.,.• fetus i KTili'tii' to kill]. The artificial destruction of the living embryo, or of the unborn fetus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      embryoc'tony [G. embryon, embryo, fetus, + kteino, I destroy.] Feticide, taking the life of the product of conception any time before birth.
  48. embryogeny - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      embryogeny (em-bri-oj'en-!) [G. embryon, embryo, + gennao, I produce.] The origin and growth of the embryo.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      embryogeny (em-bre-oj'en-e) [Gr. liiftpvov embryo + •].<•'»' to produce]. The production or origin of the embryo.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      embryogeny (em-bri-oj'en-!) [G. embryon, embryo, + gennao, I produce.] The origin and growth of the embryo.
  49. embryography - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      embryography (rm-brf-vs'-ra-fr) [fmbryo; tptufctv. to write]. A description of the embr>-o.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      embryog'raphy [G. embryon, embryo, + grapho, I write.] A treatise describing the formation and development of the embryo.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      embryography (em-bre-og'ra-fe) [Gr. i^pvov embryo + yp&ifar to write]. A treatise or description of the embryo.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      embryog'raphy [G. embryon, embryo, + grapho, I write.] A treatise describing the formation and development of the embryo.
  50. embryoma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      embryo'ma. A tumor developed from embryonal structures or from a blighted ovum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      embryoma (em-bre-o'mah). A tumor containing embryonic elements or those derived from a rudimentary contained twin parasite.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      embryo'ma. A tumor developed from embryonal structures or from a blighted ovum.
  51. embryotomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      embryotomy (em-bri-ot'o-ml) [G. embryon, embryo, + tome, cutting.] Any mutilating operation on the fetus to make possible its removal when delivery is impossible by natural means.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      embryotomy (em-bri-ot'o-ml) [G. embryon, embryo, + tome, cutting.] Any mutilating operation on the fetus to make possible its removal when delivery is impossible by natural means.
  52. embryotoxon - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      embryotoxon (em-bre-o-toksf-on) [embryo; ri^ov, a bow). A condition resembling arcus senilis, sometimes seen at birth.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      em'bryotox'on [embryo + G. toxon, bow.] A band of corneal opacity similar in appearance to the arcus senilis, sometimes seen in the newborn.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      em'bryotox'on [embryo + G. toxon, bow.] A band of corneal opacity similar in appearance to the arcus senilis, sometimes seen in the newborn.
  53. emetine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      emetine (em'-et-en). An alkaloid from ipecacroot; it is emetic, diaphoretic, and expectorant. Emetic dose \-\ gr. (0.008-0.016 Gm.); expectorant, Rt. (0.001-0.002 Gm.). Also a specific for
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      em'etine. An alkaloid from ipecac, occurring as an amorphous white powder, slightly soluble in water; it is the emetic principle of the drug; dose, gr. j (o.oi). e. hydrochlor'ide, emetinae hydrochloridum (U.S.); hypodermic dose, gr. J (0.02).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      em'etine. An alkaloid from ipecac, occurring as an amorphous white powder, slightly soluble in water; it is the emetic principle of the drug; dose, gr. j (o.oi). e. hydrochlor'ide, emetinae hydrochloridum (U.S.); hypodermic dose, gr. J (0.02).
  54. emictory - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      emictory (e-mik'-tor-e) [e, out; mingere, to void urine), i. Promoting the secretion of urine. 2. A diuretic medicine.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      emic'tory [L.] Diuretic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      emictory (e-mik'to-re) [L. e out • min'iere to urinate), i. Diuretic. 2. A diuretic medicine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      emic'tory [L.] Diuretic.
  55. eminentia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      eminentia (em-in-en'-she-ah) [L.]. An eminence. e. abducentis, a medial ridge on the floor of the fourth ventricle, e. acustica, an elevation on the floor of the fourth ventricle at the lateral triangles. e. annularis, the pons _ Varolii. e. arcuata. See eminence, arcuate, e. articularis, a rounded ridge oa the temporal bone in front of the glenoid fossa. e. capitata, the head of a bone. e. caudata, an isthmus connecting the Spigelian lobe with the under surface of the right lobe of the liver, e. cinerea, the elevated base of the trigonum vagi. e. collateral's. See eminence, collateral, e. conchas, the posterior projection on the pinna corresponding to the concha. e. cruciata, ridges intersecting in the form of a cross on the superior surface of the occipital bone. e. cuneatus, a slight swelling of the internal funicle near the eminence of the clava ; it contains the internal cuneate nucleus, e. facialis, the colliculus facialis. e. Fallopii, a ridge on the internal wall of the tympanum. e. fossa triangularis, the posterior projection on the pinna corresponding to the fossa triangularis. e. gracilis. See pyramid, posterior. e. hepatis caudata, e. hepatis longitudinalis, e. hcpatis radiata, the lobus caudata, the Spigelian lobe of<span class=
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      eminen'tia (em-i-nen'shl-ah) [L. prominence; emi»tre, to project.] Eminence, a circumscribed area raised above the general level of the surrounding surface, e. abducen'tis, e. facialis. e. acus'tica. a prominence in the floor of the fourth ventricle at the base of the trigonum vagi (ala cinerea) over which run the strie acustica1. e. annula'ris, pons Varolii. e. arcua'ta [BNA], arcuate eminence, a prominence on the superior (anterior) surface of the petrous portion of the temporal bone indicating the position of the superior semicircular canal, e. articula'ris, tuberculum articular.- of the temporal bone. e. car'pi radia'lis [BNA]. a rather large flat eminence on the radial (outer) side of the front of the wrist, due to the tuberosity of scaphoid and the ridge on the trapezium, e. car'pi ulna'ris [BNA], an eminence, smaller than the radial, as the ulnar (inner) side of the front of the wrist, due to presence of the pisiform bone. e. collatera'lis [BNA], collateral eminence, an elevation on the floor of the collateral trigone of the lateral ventricle of the brain, between the hippocampus and the calcar avis, caused by the proximity of the bottom of the mid-collateral fissure; called also the posterior collateral eminence. The anterior collateral eminence is an elevation occasionally present on the floor of the inferior horn of the lateral ventricle, caused by the proximity of the anterior portion of the collateral fissure when this is present, e. con'chte [BNA], eminence of the concha, the prominence on the cranial surface of the auricle corresponding to the concha, e. crucia'ta [BNA], cruciate eminence, a figure on the internal surface of the occipital bone formed by ridges running forward and backward from the protuberance and by the margins of the groove for the lateral sinus on either side; it divides the surface of the bone into four fossae, a cerebral and a cerebellar on each side. e. facia'lis, colliculus facialis, a thickening of the e. medialis above the medullary (acustic) striae in the floor of the fourth ventricle, marking the location of the genu of the facial nerve, e. fos'sae triangula'ris [BNA]. eminence of the triangular fossa, the prominence on the cranial surface of the auricle corresponding to the fossa triangularis. e. fronta'lis, tuber frontale [BNA]. e. gra'cilis, funiculus gracilis. e. hypoglos'si, a prominence in the floor of the fourth ventricle marking the location of the hypoglosal nucleus, e. iliopectin'ea [BNA], iliopectineal eminence, a rounded elevation on the inner surface of the innominate bone at the junction of the ilium and pubis. t. intercondyloid'ea [BNA], intercondyloid eminence, spinous process of the tibia: an elevation on the upper surface of the shaft of the tibia between the two articular surfaces. e. latera'lia (i) the tubercle on the cricoid cartilage articulating with the inferior horn of the thyroid; (2) pes accessorius. e. medii'lis [BNA], medial eminence, e. teres, funiculus teres; a small rounded elevation in the fovea superior of the floor of the fourth ventricle, bounding the median groove on either side, and
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      eminentia (em-in-en'she-ah) [L.). Same as eminence. 6. abducen'tis. Same as e. tt'res. e. acu'stica, a prominence on the floor of the fourth ventricle of the brain at the lateral triangles marking the position of the acoustic nucleus, e. annula'ris, the pons varolii. a. arcua'ta ' B \ A), an arched prominence on the upper or anterior surface of the petrous bone, above the superior semicircular canal, e. art icula ris. a cylindric elevation on the temporal bone, in front of the glenoid fossa, e. capita ta, the head of a bone: especially the capitellum of the humerus. e. car'pi radia'lis [B N A|. an eminence on the radial side of the front of the wrist formed by the tuberosity of the scaphoid and a ridge on the trapezium, e. car'pi ulna'ris [B N A), an eminence on the ulnar side of the front of the wrist caused by the fusiform bone. e. Cine'rea. Same as lamina rinerea. e. collaterals [B N A], the Pcs accessorius; a white ridge on the inferior cornu of the lateral ventricle of the brain, e. con'chio [B N A], a projection on the convex media] surface of the external ear. e. crucia'ta [B N A|. a protuberance formed by the conjunction of the two intersecting ridges of the upper surface of the occipital bone. a. facia'lia, a prominence in the angle formed by the strife and the sulcus ventriculi. a. fallo'pii, a ridge on the inner wall of the tympanum, showing the position of the facial nerve, a. fos'sw triangula'ris [B N A), the protuberance on the posterior surface of the auricle which corresponds to the triangular fossa e. «ra cilis. See clara. e. hypoglos'si, an elevation in the.,io r,,,,r|. A plaster; an adhesive, flat, solid, medicated preparation for external use. See plaster, e. adhn'sivum, adhesive plaster, e. belladpn'riio, belladonna plaster, e. cap'sici, capsicum plaster, e. hydrargy'ri, mercurial plaster, e. o'pii, opium plaster, e. plum'bi, lead plaster. e. sapo'nis, soap plaster.
  56. emprosthotonos - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      emprosthotonos (em-pros-thot'-o-nos) {tpirptxrdtv, forward; rA*-«, tension]. Tonic muscular spasm in which the body is bent forward.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      emprosthot'onos [G. emprosthen, forward, -f tones
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      emprosthotonos (em-pros-thot'o-nos) [Gr. luirpoa8tv forward + rtivtiv to stretch]. A form of spasm in tetanus which brings the head and feet forward and renders the body tense.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      emprosthot'onos [G. emprosthen, forward, -f tones
  57. empyemic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      empyemic (em-pi-em'-ik). See empyematous.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      empyemic (em-pi-e'mik). Relating to empyema. empyesis (em-pi-e'sis) [G. suppuration.] A pustular eruption, such as that of smallpox. empyocele (em'pi-o-sel) [G. en, in, -f pyon, pus. + klli, tumor.] A suppurating hydrocele; a collection of pus in the scrotum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      empyemic (em-pi-e'mik). Relating to empyema. empyesis (em-pi-e'sis) [G. suppuration.] A pustular eruption, such as that of smallpox. empyocele (em'pi-o-sel) [G. en, in, -f pyon, pus. + klli, tumor.] A suppurating hydrocele; a collection of pus in the scrotum.
  58. emulgent - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      emulgent (e-mtu'-jent) [emuleere, to millc out].
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      emulgent (e-mul'jent) [L. emulgefre to milk or drain out], i. Effecting a straining or purifying process. 2. A renal artery or vein. 3. A medicine which stimulates the flow of bile or urine.
  59. emulsive - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      emulsive (e-mul'-siv) [see emulsion], i. Forming or readily entering into an emulsion. 2. Affording oil on pressure, as certain seeds.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      emul'sive. i. Noting a substance which can be made into an emulsion. 2. Noting a substance, such as a mucilage, by which a fat or resin can be emulsified. 3. Making soft or pliant. 4. Affording a fixed oil on pressure.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      emul'sive. i. Milklike. 2. Capable of forming or being formed into an emulsion.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      emulsive (e-mul'siv). i. Capable of emulsifying a substance. 2. Susceptible of being emulsified. 3. Affording an oil on pressure.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      emul'sive. i. Noting a substance which can be made into an emulsion. 2. Noting a substance, such as a mucilage, by which a fat or resin can be emulsified. 3. Making soft or pliant. 4. Affording a fixed oil on pressure.
  60. emulsoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      emulsoid (e-mul'-soyd) [emulsion; eUat, resemblance]. An emulsion colloid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      emulsoid (e-mul'soid). A colloid solution consisting of a suspension of liquid particles in a liquid. Sec emulsion colloid, under colloid.
  61. emundation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      emundation (e-mun-da-shun) [see emundans]. I. The act of cleansing, a. The rectification of drugs.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      emunda'tion [L. emundare, to clean out.] i. Cleaning, disinfection. 2. Rectification, purification, especially of crude drugs.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      emundation (e-mun-da'shun) [L. emunda'lio a cleansing]. The rectification and garbling of drugs.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      emunda'tion [L. emundare, to clean out.] i. Cleaning, disinfection. 2. Rectification, purification, especially of crude drugs.
  62. emydin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      emydin (tm'-id-in) [tutx, the fresh-water tortoise]. A white proteid substance procured from the yolk of the eggs of turtles.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      emydin (em'id-in). The protein contained in turtles' eggs. [Gr., emys, a tortoise.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      emydin (em'id-in). A protein found in the eggs of the tortoise.
  63. enanthem - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      enanthem (en-an'-them). See enanthema.
  64. enanthema - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      enanthema (en-an-tke'-mah) [»>•, in; *ifli»io. bloom, eruption: pi., enanthemata]. An eruption on a mucous membrane, or within the body, in distinction from exanthema.
  65. enantiopathic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      enantiopathic (tn-an-le-o-polh'-ik). i. Palliative. 3. Pertaining to enantiopathy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      enantiopath'ic. I. Mutually antagonistic or antidotal, referring to morbid states, i. Allopathic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      enantiopath'ic. I. Mutually antagonistic or antidotal, referring to morbid states, i. Allopathic.
  66. enantiopathy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      enantiopathy (en-an-te-op'-oth-e) [,':•,..;...,. opposite; 7r»m, disease]. A disease antagonistic to another disease.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      enantiop'athy [G. enantios, opposite, + pathos, suffering.] i. Antipathy, antidotal treatment, a method of treatment which consists in giving a remedy the physiological action of which. is to produce symptoms which are the direct opposites of those of the disease in question. 2. Mutual antagonism of two morbid states.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      enantiop'athy [G. enantios, opposite, + pathos, suffering.] i. Antipathy, antidotal treatment, a method of treatment which consists in giving a remedy the physiological action of which. is to produce symptoms which are the direct opposites of those of the disease in question. 2. Mutual antagonism of two morbid states.
  67. enarthrodial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      enarthrodial (en-ar-thro'-de-al) [rnarlliroiis]. Having the character of an enarthrosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      enarthro'dial. Relating to an enarthrosis. e. joint, a ball-and-socket joint.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      enarthro'dial. Relating to an enarthrosis. e. joint, a ball-and-socket joint.
  68. enarthrosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      enarthrosis (en-ar-ihro'-sis) [4», in; kpipo*. a joint]. A ball-and-socket joint, like that of the hip.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      enarthro'sis [G. en, in, + arthrdsis, joint.] Balland-socket joint, a spherical joint in which a more or less extensive sphere on the head of one bone fits into a rounded cavity on the other bone, as in the hip-joint.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      enarthrosis (en-ar-thro'sis). That variety of diartbrosis which includes joints, like that of the hip, that are freely movable in all directions, and are formed by the play of a rounded bony eminence within a cuplike cavity; a ball and socket joint. [Gr., en, in, + arthrosis, joint.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      enarthro'sis [G. en, in, + arthrdsis, joint.] Balland-socket joint, a spherical joint in which a more or less extensive sphere on the head of one bone fits into a rounded cavity on the other bone, as in the hip-joint.
  69. encanthis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      encanthis (e>i-knn'-ll:is) [ittatioi, canthus], A newgrowth in the inner canthus of the eye.
  70. encephalin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      encephalin (en-se}'-al-in) [^Kt^oXoi, the brain]. A nitrogenous glucoside extracted from brain-tissue.
  71. encephaloid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      encephaloid (en-sef'-al-oid) [encephalo- ; el&ot, like], x. Resembling brain tissue. 2. Soft carcinoma. See carcinoma, encephaloid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      enceph'aloid [G. enkephalos, brain, -f eidos, resemblance.] Resembling brain substance; noting a form of carcinoma of brain-like consistence.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      encephaloid (en-sef'al-oid) [Gr. ,"-,..,'.;•«>..• Hint form], i. Resembling the brain or brain substance. 2. Encephaloma.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      enceph'aloid [G. enkephalos, brain, -f eidos, resemblance.] Resembling brain substance; noting a form of carcinoma of brain-like consistence.
  72. encephalology - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      encephalology (en-sef-al~ol'-o-je) [!-,*; •;•&brain: Xi'»>«. science] The anatomy, physiology, ana pathology of the brain
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      encephalol'ogy [G. enkephalos, brain, + -login.] Cerebrology; the branch of medicine dealing with the brain in all its relations.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      encephalology (cn-sef-al-ol'o-je) [Gr. lyKtbrain + X4>05 discourse). The sum of knowledge regarding the brain, its functions, and its diseases.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      encephalol'ogy [G. enkephalos, brain, + -login.] Cerebrology; the branch of medicine dealing with the brain in all its relations.
  73. encephaloma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      encephaloma (en-sef-al-o'-mah} [encephalo-; 5/ia, tumor], i. A tumor of the brain. 2. Encephaloid carcinoma.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      encephalo'ma. i. A tumor of brain substance, encephalocele. 2. An encephaloid carcinoma.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      encephaloma (en-sef-al-o'mah). i. Hernia of the brain. 2. Encephaloid cancer; a malignant growth of brain-like texture. See carcinoma.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      encephalo'ma. i. A tumor of brain substance, encephalocele. 2. An encephaloid carcinoma.
  74. encephalomalacia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      encephalomalacia (en-sef-al-o-mal-a'-she-ah) [ence-t phalo-; tiakajtta, softening]. Softening of the brain-" substance.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      encephalomalacia (en-sef"al-o-mal-a'se-ah) [Gr. t-, \tvit,\m brain -f- ^aXoicla softening). Morbid softness, or softening, of the brain.
  75. enchylema - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      enchylema (en-ki-le'-mah) [4*t in; xvXfc. juicej. A fluid, granular substance filling the interstices of the cell-body and the nucleus. t
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      enchylema (en-ki-le'ma) [G. en, in, + chylos, juice.] The semifluid, nearly transparent, and homogeneous matter forming the cell sap, or nuclear sap, supported by the linin network and constituting with it the cytoplasm or nucleoplasm.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      enchylema (en-ki-le'ma) [G. en, in, + chylos, juice.] The semifluid, nearly transparent, and homogeneous matter forming the cell sap, or nuclear sap, supported by the linin network and constituting with it the cytoplasm or nucleoplasm.
  76. enchyma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      enchyma (en'-ke-mah) |' ,.";•, to pour in). An organic juice elaborated from chyme, the formative juice of tissues.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      enchyma (enTci-mah) [G. an infusion.] The form ative and reparative fluid of the cells and tissues, elaborated from the chyme.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      enchyma (enTci-mah) [G. an infusion.] The form ative and reparative fluid of the cells and tissues, elaborated from the chyme.
  77. enclavement - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      enclavement (on(g)-klahv/-mon(g)) [Fr.]. Retention due to a constriction; impaction, as of the head in the pelvic strait.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      enclavement (en-klav^ment). i. Impaction, as of a fetus in the pelvic strait. 2. Retention due to constriction.
  78. endarterial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      endarterial (end-ar-te'-re-al). Within an arter>'.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      endarte'rial [G. endon, within.] Within an artery; relating to the intima of an artery.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      endarterial (end-ar-te're-al). Within an artery.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      endarte'rial [G. endon, within.] Within an artery; relating to the intima of an artery.
  79. endarteritis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      endarteritis (end-ar-ter-i'-tis) [endo-; e^r^pia, artery; mi, inMamm.ition]. Inflammation of the inner coat of an artery, e., obliterating, arteritis obliterans, a form in which } h-- production of new connective tissue obliterates the vessel-lumen.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      endarteritis (end-ar-te-ri'(re')tis) [G. endon, within, + arteria + -itis.] Inflammation of the inner coat of an artery, e. defor'mans, e. with atheromatous patches and calcareous deposits, e. oblit'erans, obliterating e., an extreme degree of e. proliferans closing the lumen of the artery, e. prolif'erans, chronic e. accompanied by a marked increase of fibrous tissue in the intima.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      endarteritis (end"ar-ter-i'tis) [Gr. troov within + T7j/ii« artery]. Inflammation of the intima of an artery, e. defor'rnans, chronic endarteritis characterized by fatty degeneration of the arterial tissues, with the formation of deposits of lime-salts, e. oblit'erans, endarteritis followed by collapse and closure of the smaller branches, e. prolif'erans, overgrowth of fibrous tissue in the internal layers of the aorta.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      endarteritis (end-ar-te-ri'(re')tis) [G. endon, within, + arteria + -itis.] Inflammation of the inner coat of an artery, e. defor'mans, e. with atheromatous patches and calcareous deposits, e. oblit'erans, obliterating e., an extreme degree of e. proliferans closing the lumen of the artery, e. prolif'erans, chronic e. accompanied by a marked increase of fibrous tissue in the intima.
  80. endeictic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      endeictic (en-di&-tik) [to, in; •s,,m'[u. to show). Symptomatic; serving as an indication.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      endeictic (en-dlk'tik) [Gr. !ri«i(i( a pointing out]. Symptomatic.
  81. endemia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ende'mia. An endemic disease.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      endemia (en-de'me-ah). Any endemic disease.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ende'mia. An endemic disease.
  82. enderon - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      enderon (en'-dn->!•.} [•'•, in; Mpot, skin]. The true skin or derm, together with the non-epithelial portion of the mucous membrane.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      enderon (en'der-on) [G. «n, in, .+ deros, skin.] The corium; the subepithelial layer of mucous membrane.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      enderon (en'der-on) [Gr. b> in + oipot skin]. The deeper part of the skin or mucous membrane, as distinguished from the epithelium or epidermis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      enderon (en'der-on) [G. «n, in, .+ deros, skin.] The corium; the subepithelial layer of mucous membrane.
  83. endoblast - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      endoblast (en'-do-blast) [endo-; &\aar6t, a germ]. The cell-nucleus; the internal blastema.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      en'doblast [G. endon, within, -4- blastos, germ.] Hypoblast, endoderm, the inner layer of the blastoderm.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      en'doblast. See entoblast.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      endoblast (en'do-blast)[Gr. tutor within + SXairrAj germ]. The endoderm or hypoblast; the more internal of the primary blastodermic layers.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      en'doblast [G. endon, within, -4- blastos, germ.] Hypoblast, endoderm, the inner layer of the blastoderm.
  84. endocarditic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      endocarditic (en-do-kar-dit'-ik) [endo-; Kap&ta, the heartl. Pertaining to or affected with endocarditis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      endocardit'ic. Relating to endocarditis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      endocarditic (en"do-kar-dit'ik). Pertaining to endocarditis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      endocardit'ic. Relating to endocarditis.
  85. endochorion - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      endochorion (en-do-ko'-re-on) [endo-; chorion], The inner chorion; the vascular layer of the allantois.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      endochorion (en-do-ko'rl-on). The vascular layer of the allantois on the inner surface of the chorion,
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      endochorion (en-do-ko're-on) [Gr. trior within + A iV11"'• chorion]. The inner chorionic layer.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      endochorion (en-do-ko'rl-on). The vascular layer of the allantois on the inner surface of the chorion,
  86. endochrome - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      endochrome (en'-do-krom) [endo-; xpapa, color]. The coloring-matter, other than green, of the endoplasm of a cell, or that of diatoms or of flowers.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      endochrome (en'do-krOm) [Gr. tvSov within , Xpu/ia color]. The coloring-matter within a cell.
  87. endocrin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      endocrin (en'-do-krin) [endo-; *pf*w, to separate]. Any internal secretion.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      endocrin (en'do-krin) [Gr. tvoov within + tplrtiv to separate]. The internal secretion of a gland.
  88. endocrinous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      endocrinous (en-dok'rin-us) [G. endon, within, 4krino, I separate.] Relating to any internal secretion, e. glands, glands which elaborate an internal secretion.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      endocrinous (en-dok'rin-us). See endocrine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      endocrinous (en-dok'rin-us) [G. endon, within, 4krino, I separate.] Relating to any internal secretion, e. glands, glands which elaborate an internal secretion.
  89. endolaryngeal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      endolaryngeal (en-ao-lar-in'-je-al) [endo-; larynx], Within the larynx.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      endolaryn'geal. Within the larynx.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      endolaryngeal (en"do-lar-in'je-al) [Gr. Ivoov within -|- XApvyf larynx]. Situated on or occurring within the larynx.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      endolaryn'geal. Within the larynx.
  90. endophlebitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      endophlebitis (en do-fle-bi'-tis) [endo- ; phlebitis], Inflammation of the inner coat of a vein.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      endophlebitis (en"do-fle-bi'tis) [Gr. trtov within + vein + -ir« inflammation]. Inflammation of the ir.iini.i of a vein.
  91. endoplast - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      endoplast (cn'-do-plast) (endo-; v\aformedJ. In biology, the nuclear body of a protozoan; the homologue of the nucleus of a histologic cell. (Huxley.)
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      en'doplast [G. tndon, within, + plastos, formed.] The nucleus of an ameba or other protozoan.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      endoplast (en'do-plast) [Gr. tutor within + Tt\iwanv to form]. The nucleus of a cell.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      en'doplast [G. tndon, within, + plastos, formed.] The nucleus of an ameba or other protozoan.
  92. endosarc - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      endosarc (en'-do-sark) [endo-; ff6pg. flesh]. The inner protoplasm of a protozoan.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      en'dosarc [G. tndon, within, + saTx(sark-), flesh.] The endoplasm of a protozoan, entosarc.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      endosarc (en'do-sark). See entosarc.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      endosarc (en'do-sark). See entosarc.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      en'dosarc [G. tndon, within, + saTx(sark-), flesh.] The endoplasm of a protozoan, entosarc.
  93. endosmometer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      endosmometer (en-dos-mom'-el-er) [endosmosis; ... a measure]. An instrument for measuring endosmosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      endosmom'eter [endosmosis + G. metron, measure.] A device for determining the rapidity of endosmosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      endosmometer (en-dos-mom'et-er) [endosmosis + Gr. utrpor measure]. An instrument for determining the rate and extent of endosmosis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      endosmom'eter [endosmosis + G. metron, measure.] A device for determining the rapidity of endosmosis.
  94. endosmotic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      endosmotic (en-dus-mot'-ik) [see fttdosmosi*-} Pertaining to endosmosis. e. equivalent, the weight of distilled water that passes into the flask of the endosmometer In exchange for a known weight of the soluble substance.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      endosmot'ic. Relating to endosmosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      endosmotic (en-dos-mot'ik). Of the nature of endosmosis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      endosmot'ic. Relating to endosmosis.
  95. endostoma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      endosto'ma. Endosteoma.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      endostoma (en-dos-to'mah). An osseous tumor within a bone. [Gr., endon, within, + osteon, a bone, + oma, tumor.] endotheliocytosis (en-do-the"le-o-si-tofsis). An abnormal increase in the number of endothelial cells.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      endostoma (en-dos-to'mah) [Gr. '.:•;,,„• within IAartov bone]. A bony tumor within a bone.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      endosto'ma. Endosteoma.
  96. endothelioid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      endothelioid (en-do-the'-If-aid) [endothelium; cttot, form]. Resembling endothelium.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      endothelioid (en-do-thell-oyd) [endothelium + G. eidos, resemblance.] Resembling endothelium. e. hab it, relative smallness of the nucleus as compared with the cytoplasm.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      endothelioid (en-do-the'le-oid). Resembling endothelium. e. cells. See under cell.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      endothelioid (en-do-thell-oyd) [endothelium + G. eidos, resemblance.] Resembling endothelium. e. hab it, relative smallness of the nucleus as compared with the cytoplasm.
  97. endovenous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      endove'nous [G. endon, within, + L. venosus, venous.] Intravenous.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      endovenous (en-do-ve'nus). Same as intravenous.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      endove'nous [G. endon, within, + L. venosus, venous.] Intravenous.
  98. enepidermic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      enepidermic (en"ep-l-dur'mik) [G. en, in, + epi, upon, + derma, skin.] On the surface of the skin, noting a mode of medication by plasters, ointments, and lotions.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      enepidermic (en-ep-e-der'mik). Relating to remedies brought into contact with the skin without friction. See inunction.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      enepidermic (en-ep-e-der'mik). Used upon or applied to the skin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      enepidermic (en"ep-l-dur'mik) [G. en, in, + epi, upon, + derma, skin.] On the surface of the skin, noting a mode of medication by plasters, ointments, and lotions.
  99. energid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      energid (cn-er'-jid) [tup-, civ, to execute]. Sachs* term for the cell-nucleus and the cytoplasm lying within its sphere of influence.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      energid (en'er-jid). The nucleus and its active cytoplasm, regarded as the essential living part of the cell.
  100. energin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      energin (en-ur'-jin). An artificial food prepared from protein.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      energin (en'er-jin). A certain nutrient made from rice.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      energin (en'er-jin). A nutrient preparation from the proteins of rice.
  101. enorganic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      enorganic (fn-or-gan'-ik). Referring to that which Is inherent in an organism.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      enorgan'ic [G. en, in, + organon, organ.] Occurring as an innate characteristic of the organism.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      enorganic (en-or-gan'ik). Existing as a permanent quality of the organism.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      enorgan'ic [G. en, in, + organon, organ.] Occurring as an innate characteristic of the organism.
  102. enosimania - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      enosimania (en-os-e-ma'-ne-oh) (troffii, trembling; fiat-ia, madness}. Insanity marked by terror, the patient expecting for himself the most dreadful visitations.
  103. enostosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      enostosis '(en-os-trf-sis) [if, inj , bone]. A tumor or bony outgrowth within the medullary canal of a bone.
  104. entad - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      entad (en1-tad) [see ental]. From without inward;
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      en'tad [G. entos, within, + L. ad, to.] Toward the interior.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      entad (cn'tad). Toward the center; inwardly.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      en'tad [G. entos, within, + L. ad, to.] Toward the interior.
  105. enteral - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      enteral (en'-ter-al) [Irrtpov. intestine]. Intestinal. See par enteral.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      enteral (en'ter-al) [Gr. lirrtpov intestine]. Within the intestine.
  106. enteralgia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      enteralgia (en-ter-al'-je-ah) {entero-; &xyoi. pain]. Pain in the bowels.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      enteral'gia [G. enteron, intestine, + algos, pain.] Cramps, colic; severe neuralgic pain in the intes<span class=
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      enteralgia (cn-ter-al'je-ah) [Gr. brtpor intestine + fi\-,,K pain]. Pain or neuralgia of the intestine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      enteral'gia [G. enteron, intestine, + algos, pain.] Cramps, colic; severe neuralgic pain in the intes.] Inflammation of both the intestine and the liver.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      enterohepatitis (en"ter-o-hep-at-i'tis) [Gr. Irrepov bowel + ffrap liver + -itu inflammation], i. Inflammation of the bowel and liver. 3. An infectious disease of turkeys with lesions of the intestine and liver, and a dark discoloration of the comb. Called also blackhead of turkeys.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      enterohepatitis (en*ter-o-hep-S-ti'(te')tis) [G. enteron, intestine, + hepar(hfpat-), liver, + -t*i>.] Inflammation of both the intestine and the liver.
  107. enterolithiasis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      enterolithiasis (en-ter-o-lith-i'-as-is) [entero-; lithiaji.r]. The formation of intestinal calculi.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      enterolithi'asis. The presence of calculi in the intestine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      enterolithi'asis. The presence of calculi in the intestine.
  108. enteroptosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      enteroptosis (en-ter-op-tof-sis) [entero-; »T*r«, a fall]. Prolapse of the intestine. See Slitter's sign.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      enteroptosis (en"ter-op-to'sis). Prolapse of the intestines, observed in Glenard's disease. Used as the general term to denote prolapse of the abdominal organs. See splanchnoptosis. [Gr., enteron, intestine, -f- ptosis, a fall.]
  109. enterorrhagia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      enterorrhagia (en-ter-or-aj'-e-ah) [entero-; fa-fvi-i-m. to burst forth). Intestinal hemorrhage.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      enterorrha'gia [G. enteron, intestine, + -rhagia.] Intestinal hemorrhage.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      enterorrhagia (en"ter-or-a'je-ah) [Or. Ivrtpov intestine 4- ,'.,;, .-ivm to burst forth]. Hemorrhage from the intestine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      enterorrha'gia [G. enteron, intestine, + -rhagia.] Intestinal hemorrhage.
  110. enteroscope - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      enteroscope (en'-ter-o-skdp) (entero-; vKortlv, to examine]. An instrument for examining the inside of the intestine by means of electric light.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      en'teroscope [G. enteron, intestine, + shaped, I examine.] A form of speculum for aid in inspecting the inside of the intestine in operative cases.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      enteroscope (en'ter-o-skop). An instrument for viewing the inside of the intestine, such as the sigmoidpscope. [Gr., enteron, intestine, + skopein, to view.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      enteroscope (en'ter-o-skap) [Gr. trrtpov bowel + owl-Mi' to inspect]. An instrument for inspecting the inside of the intestine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      en'teroscope [G. enteron, intestine, + shaped, I examine.] A form of speculum for aid in inspecting the inside of the intestine in operative cases.
  111. enterostasis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      enterostasis (en-ter-os'ta-sis) [G. enteron, intestine, + stasis, a standing.] Intestinal stasis, a retardation or arrest of the passage of the intestinal contents.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      enterostasis (en"ter-o-sta'sis) [Gr. Ivrtpov intestine + <rra<m stoppage]. Intestinal stasis; the stoppage of the food in its passage through the intestine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      enterostasis (en-ter-os'ta-sis) [G. enteron, intestine, + stasis, a standing.] Intestinal stasis, a retardation or arrest of the passage of the intestinal contents.
  112. enterostaxis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      enterostax'is [G. enteron, intestine, + staxis, trickling.] Oozing of blood from the mucous membrane of the intestine.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      enterostaxis (en"ter-o-staks'is) [Gr. Ivrtpov intestine + <T7-A£ij dripping]. Slow hemorrhage through the intestinal mucous membrane.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      enterostax'is [G. enteron, intestine, + staxis, trickling.] Oozing of blood from the mucous membrane of the intestine.
  113. enterostomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      enterostomy (en-ter-os'-to-me) [entero-; or.'.yn. mouth]. The formation of an artificial opening into the intestine through the abdominal wall.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      enterostomy (en-ter-os'to-ml) [G. enteron, intestine, + stama, mouth.) The establishment of an artificial anus or fistula into the intestine through the abdominal wall.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      enterostomy (en-ter-os'to-me). The operation of making a permanent opening into the small intestine, through the abdominal wall, for the purpose of insert
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      enterostomy (en-ter-os'to-ml) [G. enteron, intestine, + stama, mouth.) The establishment of an artificial anus or fistula into the intestine through the abdominal wall.
  114. enterotomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      enterotomy (en-ter-ot'-o-me) [see enterotome]. Incision of the intestine.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      enterotomy (en-ter-ofom-e). The operation of making an opening into the intestine. [Gr., enteron, intestine, + tmnein, to cut.]
  115. enthetic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      enthetic (en-thet'-ik) Ifcrrffcw, to put in). Introduced; coming from without; appHed especially to syphilitic and other specific contagious diseases. Exogenous.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      enthet'ic. i. Relating to enthesis. a. Exogenous, en'thlasis [G. a dent.] Depressed fracture of the skull.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      enthetic (en-thet'ik) [Gr. fa> in + riBivat to place]. Introduced from without; exogenous.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      enthet'ic. i. Relating to enthesis. a. Exogenous, en'thlasis [G. a dent.] Depressed fracture of the skull.
  116. entoblast - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      entoblast (en'-to-blast) (ento-; ffXatrris, a bud, germ). The nucleolusor germinal spot. Endoblaat.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      entoblast (en'to-blast). The rudimentary hypoblast. [Gr., entos, within, -f- blastos. sprout.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      entoblast (en'to-blast) [Gr. forAs within + QXaorAt germ], i. The inner of the two primitive embryonic layers; the hypoblast. 2. A cell nucleolus. 3. Any one of the segmentational spheres whence the endodermal cells arise.
  117. entoderm - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      entoderm (en'-to-derm) [ento-; Stf>na, skin]. The simple cell-layer lining the cavity of the primitive intestine; the hypoblast. Endoderm.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      entoderm (en'to-derm). The hypoblast. [Gr., entos. within, + derma, a skin.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      entoderm (en'to-derm) [Gr. ifrin within + tippa skin]. The hypoblast, or innermost layer of the blastoderm.
  118. entosthoblast - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      entosthoblast (en-las'-tho-blast) [Irrofft, from within; 0X<z<7rAi, germ]. The supposed nucleus of a nucleolus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      entosthoblast (en-tos'tho-blast) [Gr. trroaOc from within + ffKaarin germ]. The nucleus of the nucleolus.
  119. entozoon - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      entozoon (en-to-io'-on) [ento-; fipw-, an animal; pi., entozoa}. An animal parasite living within another animal.
  120. epactal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epactal (e-pak'-lal) \in*rtt, brought in]. Intercalated ; supernumerary, e. bones, Wormian bones. e. cartilages. See cartilage.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epac'tal [G. epaklos, imported, added to.] Supernumerary, e. bones, sutural or Wormian bones.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epac'tal [G. epaklos, imported, added to.] Supernumerary, e. bones, sutural or Wormian bones.
  121. epencephalic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epencephalic (ep-en-sef-al'-ik). Pertaining to the epencephalon.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epencephal'ic. Relating to the epencephalon; occipital.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epencephal'ic. Relating to the epencephalon; occipital.
  122. epencephalon - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epencephalon (ep-en-sef'-al-on) \l*t, upon; encefhtilnn]. The after-brain or hind-brain; the cerebellum and pons taken together; or the cerebellum, pons and medulla.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epenceph'alon [G. epi, upon, + enkephalos, brain.] The metencephalon. the anterior division of the third cerebral vesicle or rhombencephalon; the cerebellum and pons Varolii, or these and the medulla, myelencephalon, as well.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epenceph'alon [G. epi, upon, + enkephalos, brain.] The metencephalon. the anterior division of the third cerebral vesicle or rhombencephalon; the cerebellum and pons Varolii, or these and the medulla, myelencephalon, as well.
  123. ephebic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ephebic (ef-e'-bik) [.v^flo.w, belonging to puberty]. Pertaining to youth, adolescence, or puberty.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ephe'bic [G. ephebikos, relating to youth.] Relating to the period of puberty or to a youth; pubertal.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      ephebic (ef-eb'ik). Concerning youth or the period of adolescence. [Gr., ephebikos.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ephebic (ef-eb'ik) [Gr. ifrujmos pertaining to puberty]. Pertaining to youth or the period of puberty.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ephe'bic [G. ephebikos, relating to youth.] Relating to the period of puberty or to a youth; pubertal.
  124. ephelis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ephelis (ef-e'-lis) [1*1, upon; iJXioi, the sun; fl.. ephelides]. A freckle.
  125. ephippium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ephippium (ef-ip'-e-um) [epi-; Irrot, horse: pi.. ephippia]. Same as sella turcica.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ephippium (6-fipl-um) [G. epi, upon, + hippos, horse.] Sella turcica.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ephippium (ep-hlp'e-um) [Gr. trl upon + Iiriros horse). The sella turcica.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ephippium (6-fipl-um) [G. epi, upon, + hippos, horse.] Sella turcica.
  126. epichordal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epichordal (cp-e-kord'-af) [epi-; x"M-i. a cord]. Located above or dorsad of the notochord; applied especially to cerebral structures.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epichordal (ep-1-kor'dal). On the dorsal side of the notochord, especially its cranial extremity.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      epichordal (ep-ik-or'dal). Situated dorsad of the notochord.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epichordal (ep-1-kor'dal). On the dorsal side of the notochord, especially its cranial extremity.
  127. epicondyle - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epicondyle (ep-e-kon'-dll) [epi-; «i*9vXot, a knuckle]. An eminence upon a bone above ita condyle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epicondyle (ep-I-kon'dfl) [G. epi, upon, + kondylos, condyle.] A projection from a long bone near the articular extremity above or upon the condyle ; see epicondylus.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      epicondyle (ep-e-kon'dil). The ridge of tone, above a condyle. [Gr., epi, upon, + kondylos, knuckle.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      epicondyle (ep-ik-on'dll) [Gr. trl upon + xov condyle]. An eminence upon a bone and above itscondyle. lateral e. i . The external condyle of the humerus. 2. The external tuberosity of the femur, median e. i. The internal condyle of the humerus. 2. The inner tuberosity of the femur.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epicondyle (ep-I-kon'dfl) [G. epi, upon, + kondylos, condyle.] A projection from a long bone near the articular extremity above or upon the condyle ; see epicondylus.
  128. epicoracoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epicoracoid (ep-e-kor'-ok-oid) [epi-; coracoid], Located upon or over the coracoid process.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epicor'acoid. Upon or above the coracoid process.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      epicoracoid (ep-ik-or'ak-oid). Situated above the coracoid process.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epicor'acoid. Upon or above the coracoid process.
  129. epicranium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epicranium (ep-e-kro'-ne-um) [epi-; cranium], The structures covering the cranium.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epicra'nium [G. epi, upon, + kranion, skull.] The scalp, galea capitis; the muscle, aponeurosis, and skin covering the cranium.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epicra'nium [G. epi, upon, + kranion, skull.] The scalp, galea capitis; the muscle, aponeurosis, and skin covering the cranium.
  130. epicranius - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epicranius (ep-e-kra'-ne-us). The occipitofrontalia muscle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epicra'nius. Musculus* epicranius.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epicra'nius. Musculus* epicranius.
  131. epicrisis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epicrisis (ep-e-kri'-sis) [IrUfaaa, determination]. The disease-phenomena succeeding crisis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epicrisis (ep-T-kri'sis). A secondary crisis; a crisis terminating a recrudescence of morbid symptoms following a primary crisis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epicrisis (ep-T-kri'sis). A secondary crisis; a crisis terminating a recrudescence of morbid symptoms following a primary crisis.
  132. epicyte - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epicyte (ep'-e-sii) [epi-; uliroi, cell], i. The cellwall, a. A cell of epithelial tissue.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epicyte (epl-sit) [G. epi, upon, + kytos, cell.] i. An epithelial cell. 2. A cell-membrane.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epicyte (epl-sit) [G. epi, upon, + kytos, cell.] i. An epithelial cell. 2. A cell-membrane.
  133. epidemicity - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epidemicity (ep-e-dem-is'-it-e). The quality of being epidemic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epidemicity (ep-I-dem-isl-tl). The state of prevailing in epidemic form.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      epidemicity (ep"id:em-is'it-e). The quality or
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epidemicity (ep-I-dem-isl-tl). The state of prevailing in epidemic form.
  134. epidemiography - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epidemiog'raphy [G. epidlmios, epidemic, + grapht, a writing.] A descriptive treatise of epidemic diseases or of any particular epidemic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epidemiog'raphy [G. epidlmios, epidemic, + grapht, a writing.] A descriptive treatise of epidemic diseases or of any particular epidemic.
  135. epiderm - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epiderm (ep'-e-derm). See epidermis.
  136. epiderma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epiderma (ep-e-der'-mah) [epidermis; pi., epiderIki.'.m]. Any abnormal outgrowth from the epidermis.
  137. epidermolysis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epidermolysis (ep-e-der-mol'-is-is) [epidermis], A rare skin disease in which l.ulkr form on the slightest pressure. It shows itself in infancy and is most pronounced in summer.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epidermol'ysis [epidermis + lysis, loosening.] A condition in which the epidermis is loosely attached to the corium, readily exfoliating or forming blisters, e. bullo'sa, acantholysis bullosa; a condition of the skin, hereditary in origin, in which large bulte are produced by slight mechanical irritation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      epidermolysis (ep"id er-mol'is-is) [Gr. intfpuls skin + \riuv loosening). A loosened state of the epidermis, e. bullo'sa, a variety marked by the formation of deep-seated bullx, which appear after irritation or rubbing of the parts.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epidermol'ysis [epidermis + lysis, loosening.] A condition in which the epidermis is loosely attached to the corium, readily exfoliating or forming blisters, e. bullo'sa, acantholysis bullosa; a condition of the skin, hereditary in origin, in which large bulte are produced by slight mechanical irritation.
  138. epididymectomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epididymectomy (cp-e-dtd-tm-elr-tom-c) [epididy
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      epididymectomy (ep"id-id-im-ek'to-me) (epididymis + Gr. (xt-out) excision). Surgical removal of the epididymis.
  139. epididymitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epididymitis (ep-e-did-im-i'-tis) [epididymis; tra, inflammation]. Inflammation of the epididymis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epididymitis(ep-I-did-I-mi'(me')tis). Inflammation of the epididymis.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      epididymitis. Inflammation of the epididymis. [Gr., epididymis, the cpididy-Tri-. -+- itis, inflammation.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      epididymitis (ep"id-id-im-i'tis). Inflammation of the epididymis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epididymitis(ep-I-did-I-mi'(me')tis). Inflammation of the epididymis.
  140. epigaster - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epigaster (ep-e-gas'-ttr) [epigastrium]. The large intestine; hindgut.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epigas'ter [G. epi, upon, + gasler, belly.] The hind-gut, the primitive large intestine.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      epigaster (ep-e-gas'ter) [Gr. trl upon + yaarttp belly]. The hind-gut: the embryonic structure whence the colon is formed.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epigas'ter [G. epi, upon, + gasler, belly.] The hind-gut, the primitive large intestine.
  141. epiglottidean - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epiglottidean (ep-e-glot-id'-e-an). See epiglottic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epiglottid'ean. Relating to the epiglottis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      epiglottidean (ep"e-glot-id'e-an). Pertaining to the epiglottis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epiglottid'ean. Relating to the epiglottis.
  142. epiglottiditis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epiglottiditis (ep-e-glot-id-i'-tis) [epiglottis; mi.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epiglottiditis (ep-l-glot-id-i'(e')tis). Inflammation of the epiglottis, epiglottitis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epiglottiditis (ep-l-glot-id-i'(e')tis). Inflammation of the epiglottis, epiglottitis.
  143. epiglottitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epiglottitis (ep-e-glot-i'-tis). See epiglolliditis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epiglottitis (ep-i-glot-i'(e')tis). Epiglottiditis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      epiglottitis (ep"e-glot-i'tis). Inflammation of the epiglottis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epiglottitis (ep-i-glot-i'(e')tis). Epiglottiditis.
  144. epigonal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      epigonal (ep-ig'on-al) [Gr. trl on + yorii seed). Situated on an embryonic germ gland.
  145. epilamellar - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epilamell'ar. Upon or above a basement membrane.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      epilamellar (ep-e-lam-el'ar). Situated outside of the basement-membrane.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epilamell'ar. Upon or above a basement membrane.
  146. epileptogenous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epileptogenous (ep-il-c.p-toj'-en-us) [epilepsy; ytrtw, to produce]. Producing epilepsy.
  147. epileptoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epileptoid (ep-il-ep'-toid) [epilepsy; tl&ai, likeness]. I. Resembling epilepsy. 2. A person subject to nervous attacks of the general nature of epilepsy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epileptoid (ep-I-lep'toyd) [G. epilepsis, epilepsy, + eidos, resemblance.] I. Resembling epilepsy, epileptiform; noting certain convulsions, especially of hysterical nature. 2. An epileptic degenerate.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      epileptoid (ep-e-lep'toid). Resembling epilepsy; epileptiform.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epileptoid (ep-I-lep'toyd) [G. epilepsis, epilepsy, + eidos, resemblance.] I. Resembling epilepsy, epileptiform; noting certain convulsions, especially of hysterical nature. 2. An epileptic degenerate.
  148. epimerite - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epime'rite [G. epi, upon, + meris, part.] The attaching organ of a cephalont.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      epimerite (ep-e-mer'It) [Gr. brl upon + pipes part]. An organ of certain gregarine protozoa by which they are attached to epithelial cells.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epime'rite [G. epi, upon, + meris, part.] The attaching organ of a cephalont.
  149. epimorphosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      epimorphosis (ep-e-mor-fo'sis) [Gr. ,'-; upon + Av'ij form]. The regeneration of a piece of an organism by proliferation at the cut surface.
  150. epineural - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epineural (ep-e-nu'-ral) [epi-; vtvpov, a nerve]. In biology, applied to structures attached to a neural arch.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epineural (ep-I-nu'ral). On a neural arch.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epineural (ep-I-nu'ral). On a neural arch.
  151. epineurium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epineurium (ep-e-nu'-re-um) [epi-; caipor, a nerve]. The connective-tissue sheath of a nerve-trunk.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epineurium (ep-I-nu'rl-um) [G. epi, upon, + neuron, nerve.] The connective tissue surrounding a nerve-trunk and binding together the funiculi; it contains the blood-vessels and lymphatics and usually more or less fat.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epineurium (ep-I-nu'rl-um) [G. epi, upon, + neuron, nerve.] The connective tissue surrounding a nerve-trunk and binding together the funiculi; it contains the blood-vessels and lymphatics and usually more or less fat.
  152. epiotic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epiotic (ep-e-ot'-ik) [epi-; oh, ear]. Situated above or on the cartilage of the ear.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epio'tic [G. epi, upon, + ous(dt-~), ear.] Above the ear, noting a bone in certain animals, and also a mastoid center of ossification.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epio'tic [G. epi, upon, + ous(dt-~), ear.] Above the ear, noting a bone in certain animals, and also a mastoid center of ossification.
  153. epipastic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epipastic (ep-e-pas'-tik) (*Ti*-iff«t*, to sprinkle]. Having the qualities of a dusting-powder.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epipas'tic [G. epipasso, I sprinkle over.] Noting a dusting powder.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epipas'tic [G. epipasso, I sprinkle over.] Noting a dusting powder.
  154. epipharynx - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epipharynx (ep-«-far1-inks) [epi-; pharynx}, i. In biology, the median projection on the internal surface of the upper lip of an insect. 2. The nasopharynx.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epiphar'ynx [G. epi, on, over, + pharynx,} Rhinopharynx.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epiphar'ynx [G. epi, on, over, + pharynx,} Rhinopharynx.
  155. epiphysitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epiphysitis (ep-if-is-i'-tis). See epiphyseitis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epiphysitis (ep-I'fl-si'(se')tis). Inflammation of an
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      epiphysitis (ep"if-is-i'tis). Inflammatioa of an epiphysis. Generally a disease ot infancy, affecting principally the epiphyses at the hip, knee, and shoulder.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epiphysitis (ep-I'fl-si'(se')tis). Inflammation of an
  156. epiplocele - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epiplocele (ep-ip'-lo-se[) [epiploon; xijXi), hernia]. A hernia containing omen turn.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epiplocele (e-piplo-sel) [G. epiploon, omentum, + kill, hernia.] Hernia of the omentum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epiplocele (e-piplo-sel) [G. epiploon, omentum, + kill, hernia.] Hernia of the omentum.
  157. epiploitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epiploitis (e-pip-lo-i'-tis) [epiploon; im, inflammation]. Inflammation of the omentum; omental peritonitis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epiploitis (ep-I-plo-i'(e')tis). Inflammation of the epiploon, or great omentum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epiploitis (ep-I-plo-i'(e')tis). Inflammation of the epiploon, or great omentum.
  158. epiploscheocele - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epiploscheocele (ep-ip-los'-ke-o-sel) [epiploon; iixtoi", scrotum; *iiXn. hernia]. Omental hernia descending into the scrotum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epiploscheocele (ep-1-plosTce-o-sel) [G. epiploon, omentum, + oscheon, scrotum, + kill, hernia.] Scrota! hernia containing omentum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epiploscheocele (ep-1-plosTce-o-sel) [G. epiploon, omentum, + oscheon, scrotum, + kill, hernia.] Scrota! hernia containing omentum.
  159. episcleral - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      episcleral (ep-e-$Me'-ral) [episclera]. Situated on the outside of the sclerotic coat.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      episcle'ral. I. Upon the sclerotic coat of the eye. 3. Relating to the episclera.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      episcle'ral. I. Upon the sclerotic coat of the eye. 3. Relating to the episclera.
  160. episiorrhaphy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      episiorrhaphy (ep-it-e-or'-a-fe) [episio-; botfi, seam]. An operation for the repair of tears about the vulva.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      episiorrhaphy (e-pis-I-or'ra-fl) [G. episeion, pudenda, + rhaphe, a stitching.] Repair of a lacerated vulva.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      episiorrhaphy (e-pis-I-or'ra-fl) [G. episeion, pudenda, + rhaphe, a stitching.] Repair of a lacerated vulva.
  161. epispadias - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epispadias (ep-e-spa'-de-as) [ept-; rrtar, to pierce). A condition in which the urethra opens on the upper part of the penis, either on the dorsum or on the glans
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epispadias (ep-l-spadl-as) [G. epi, upon, + spadon, a rent.] A malformation of the penis in which the urethra opens on the dorsum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epispadias (ep-l-spadl-as) [G. epi, upon, + spadon, a rent.] A malformation of the penis in which the urethra opens on the dorsum.
  162. episternal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      episternal (ep-e-ster'-nal) [epi-; VTkpt*a>, the sternum]. Above the sternum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epister'nal [G. epi, upon, + sternon, sternum.] Suprasternal, over or on the sternum; relating to the episternum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epister'nal [G. epi, upon, + sternon, sternum.] Suprasternal, over or on the sternum; relating to the episternum.
  163. episternum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epister'num [G. epi, upon, + sternon, sternum.] The upper piece of the sternum, or manubrium: presternum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epister'num [G. epi, upon, + sternon, sternum.] The upper piece of the sternum, or manubrium: presternum.
  164. epitheliomatous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epitheliomatous (rf*-e-lhc-lc-om'-al-ns). Having the nature of an epithelioma.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epithelio'matous. Relating to epithelioma.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epithelio'matous. Relating to epithelioma.
  165. epithem - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epithem (ep'-itk-em) [Iwtlhina, a poultice: /•.'., eptthemata]. Any local application; as a compress, fomentation, lotion, or poultice; from this definition some writers exclude salves, plasters, and ointments.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ep'ithem [G. epithimo., a cover.] , An external application, such as a poultice, but not a plaster or ointment.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      epithem (ep'ith-em) [Gr. er( on -f- ri#b> to place]. Any poultice, embrocation, or external application other than ointment, blister, salve, or plaster.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ep'ithem [G. epithimo., a cover.] , An external application, such as a poultice, but not a plaster or ointment.
  166. epithesis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epithesis (e-pitk'-es-is) [4rir4enu. to lay on], i. The surgical correction of deformed or crooked limbs. 2. A splint, or similar appliance.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      epithesis (ep-ith'e-sis) [Gr. brtfartt]. i. The surgical correction of deformity or of crooked limbs. 2. A splint or other appliance to be worn.
  167. epitonic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epitonic (ep-e-ton'-ik) [twiT*tt>tivt to stretch]. Tightly drawn; on the stretch.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      epitonic (ep-e-ton'ik) [Gr. fcrirovot strained]. Abnormally tense or tonic; exhibiting an abnormal degree of tension or of tone.
  168. epitrichium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epitrichium (cp-e-lrik'-e-um) [epi-; rptxtof, a small hair]. Superficial layer of fetal epidermis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epitrichium (ep-I-trikl-um) [G. epi, upon, + trichion, a small hair.] A membrane or outer layer of epidermis enveloping the embryo.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epitrichium (ep-I-trikl-um) [G. epi, upon, + trichion, a small hair.] A membrane or outer layer of epidermis enveloping the embryo.
  169. epitympanic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epitympanic (ep-e-tim-pan'-ik) \epi-; Tltpvtuw, the tympanum]. Upon or above the tympanum, e. recess, the attic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epitympan'ic. Above, or in the upper part of, the tympanum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epitympan'ic. Above, or in the upper part of, the tympanum.
  170. epizoon - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epizoon (ef>-c-zv'~on) [epi-; fvtfizcja]. An animal parasite living upon the exterior of the body.
  171. eponychium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      eponychium (ep-o-nik'-e-um) [epi-; 6*-uC, fingernail). A horny condition of the epidermis from the second to the eighth month of fetal life, indicating the position of the future nail. The thickened epitrichium covering the nail area.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      eponychium (ep-o-nik1-um) [G. epi, upon, + onyx (onych-), nail.] i. The condensed epidermis preceding the formation of the nail in the embryo. a. Quick of the nail. 3. The thin skin adherent to the nail at its root; nail-skin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      eponychium (ep-o-nik'e-um) [Gr. brl on + &-u£ nail], i. The homy embryonic structure whence the nail is developed. 2. The nail-skin: a film of epidermis which covers the body of the nail for a limited distance.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      eponychium (ep-o-nik1-um) [G. epi, upon, + onyx (onych-), nail.] i. The condensed epidermis preceding the formation of the nail in the embryo. a. Quick of the nail. 3. The thin skin adherent to the nail at its root; nail-skin.
  172. epoophoron - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epoophoron (ep-o-of-or-on) [epi-; rptiv, to bear). The parovarium.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epoophoron (ep-o-of'or-on) [G. epi, upon, + dophoros, egg-bearing.) [BNA]. Parovarium, organ of Rosenmuller, a collection of rudimentary tubules in the mesosalpinx between the ovary and the Fallopian tube; it is the remains of the proximal portion of the Wolffian body and the analogue of the paradidymis in the male.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      epoophoron (ep-o-of'o-ron). Syn.: f varium. A body formed of the tube: the upper part of the mesonephros in female embryo. It is known also as organ of Rpsenmuller, and is the anah of the epididymis of the male. [Gr., upon, + oon, an egg, + phcretn bear.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epoophoron (ep-o-of'or-on) [G. epi, upon, + dophoros, egg-bearing.) [BNA]. Parovarium, organ of Rosenmuller, a collection of rudimentary tubules in the mesosalpinx between the ovary and the Fallopian tube; it is the remains of the proximal portion of the Wolffian body and the analogue of the paradidymis in the male.
  173. epulis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epulis (ep-u'-lis) [epi-; o&Xo, the gums]. A fibrous tumor of the alveolar processes of the jaws, e., malignant, a giant-cell sarcoma of the jaw.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epulis [G. epoulis, a gumboil.] A small tumor of the gum or of the periosteum of the jaw, usually either a fibrous tumor or a sarcoma.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      epulis (ep-u'lis) [Gr. brl on -i- or.W gum]. A fibrous tumor of the gums, usually seated on the periosteum or bone of the jaw. malignant e., giant-cell sarcoma of the jaw.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epulis [G. epoulis, a gumboil.] A small tumor of the gum or of the periosteum of the jaw, usually either a fibrous tumor or a sarcoma.
  174. epulotic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      epulotic (ep-ii-lot'-ik) [epi-; 06X4, scar]. I. Promoting epulosis or cicatrization. 3. A remedy or application that promotes the healing of wounds or sores.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      epulot'ic. i. Cicatrizing. 2. An agent which promotes cicatrization.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      epulotic (ep-u-lot'ik). Promoting cicatrization.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      epulot'ic. i. Cicatrizing. 2. An agent which promotes cicatrization.
  175. equinism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      equinism (e'kwin-izm). A horse-like gait resulting from gunshot wounds of the legs. equinovarus (e-kwi"no-va'rus). A blending of
  176. equinus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      equinus (c-ku-i'-nus) [equus, a horse]. I. Talipes equinus. 2. Relating to the horse; equine, e. dorsalis, a form of talipes equinus in which the patient walks on the dorsal surface of the flexed toes. e. plantaris, the form of talipes equinus in which the toes are extended throughout or only at the metatarsophalangeal joint.
  177. eremacausis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      eremacausis (er-e-mok-aw'-sis) \ni"islowly; gaunt, burning]. Slow oxidation or gradual decay; slow combustion.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      eremacausis (e-rem-3-kaw'sis) [G. irema, by degrees, + kausis, a burning.] Slow combustion or oxidation.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      eremacausis (er"em-ak-aw'sis). The slow oxidation of organic matter, exposed to the action of heat. [Gr., crema, slowly, -f- kausis, a burning.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      eremacausis (e-rem-3-kaw'sis) [G. irema, by degrees, + kausis, a burning.] Slow combustion or oxidation.
  178. eremophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      eremophobia (er-em-o-fdesolate; ly,!"-., fear]. The same as agoraphobia, a. :•.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      eremophobia (er"e-mo-fo'bl-ah) [G. eretnos, a wilderness, + phobos, fear.] Morbid fear of desert places or of solitude.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      eremophobia (er-e-mo-fo'be-ah) [Gr. Iprjitm solitary + ^".i'". fear]. Morbid fear of being alone.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      eremophobia (er"e-mo-fo'bl-ah) [G. eretnos, a wilderness, + phobos, fear.] Morbid fear of desert places or of solitude.
  179. erepsin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      erepsin (er-ep'-sin) [Ipd-rtiit, to destroy]. A ferment produced by the intestinal mucosa, having no effect on unaltered albumin but causing cleavage of peptones.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      erep'sin [G. ereptomai, I feed upon.] An enzyme (protease) in the small intestine which converts peptones into simpler products.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      erepsin (e-rep'sin). A ferment of the intestinal mucous membrane which breaks up peptones and dcutero-albumins, but has no effect on unaltered albumin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      erep'sin [G. ereptomai, I feed upon.] An enzyme (protease) in the small intestine which converts peptones into simpler products.
  180. erethistic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      erethistic (er-e-this'tik) [Gr. {peffurrucot]. i. Pertaining to or affected with erethism. 2. Provocative of or increasing irritation.
  181. ereuthrophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ereuthrophobia (er"uth-ro-fo1>e-ah). Erythrophobia.
  182. ergasiomania - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ergasiomania (er-gas"e-o-ma'ne-ah) \Gi. tpyatrio, work -t- itai>ia madness]. An insane desire to be continually at work; also, extreme eagerness to perform operations.
  183. ergograph - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ergograph (ur'-go-graf) [Ifyof, workj iflalxa, to write]. A recording ergometer. An instrument for recording the extent of movement produced by a contracting <nuscle, or the amount of work it is capable of doing.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      ergograph (er'go-graf). An instrument for recording muscular work. [Gr., ergon, work, + graphein, to record.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ergograph (er'go-graf) [Gr. tpyov work 4- ypaiptiv to record]. An instrument for recording work done in muscular exertion. Mosso's e. (1800). an apparatus for recording the force and frequency of flexion of the fingers.
  184. erigeron - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      erigeron (er-ij'-er-on) {^piyip^v, groundsel]. Fleabane. The plant E. canadense, having physiological actions like those of oil of turpentine, butlessirritant. It contains oil of erigeron, and is used asahemostatic. E. bfttidifolium and E. philadelphicum afford similar oil, and have the same properties. E. canadense is used in dropsy and diseases of the genitourinary tract, e., fluidextract of. Dose 30-60 min. (1.8— 3-7 Cc.). e., oil of (oleum erigerontis, U. S. P.). Dose 10 min.-J dr. (0.65-2.0 Cc.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      erigeron (er-ij'er-on) [G. irigerdn, early old.] The dried leaves and flowering tops of Leptilon canadense (Erigtron canadense), flcabane, mare'stail, cow's-tail, colt's-tail, pride-weed, butterweed, horse-weed, scabious; diaphoretic and expectorant in doses of 5i~' (i5-°~3°'°) of a decoction (half-ounce to the pint).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      erigeron (er-ij'er-on) [G. irigerdn, early old.] The dried leaves and flowering tops of Leptilon canadense (Erigtron canadense), flcabane, mare'stail, cow's-tail, colt's-tail, pride-weed, butterweed, horse-weed, scabious; diaphoretic and expectorant in doses of 5i~' (i5-°~3°'°) of a decoction (half-ounce to the pint).
  185. erotomaniac - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      erotomaniac (rr-ot-o-m-i'-ne-ak). A patient who is afflicted with erotomania.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      erotoma'niac. A sufferer from erotomania.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      erotomaniac (e-rot-o-ma'ne-ak). A person affected with erotomania.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      erotoma'niac. A sufferer from erotomania.
  186. erubescence - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      erubescence (er-oo-bes'-cns) [entbescentia, blushing]. Redness of the skin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      erubes'cence [L. erubescere, to redden.] A blush, or reddening of the skin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      erubes'cence [L. erubescere, to redden.] A blush, or reddening of the skin.
  187. erysipelatous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      erysipelatous (er-is-ip-el'-at-us) [erysipelas]. Of the nature of or affected with erysipelas.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      erysipel'atous. Relating to erysipelas.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      erysipelatous (er-is-ip-el'at-us). Pertaining to, or of the nature of, erysipelas.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      erysipelatous (er"is-ip-el'at-us). Pertaining to or of the nature of erysipelas.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      erysipel'atous. Relating to erysipelas.
  188. erysipeloid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      erysipeloid (er-is-ip'-el-oid) [erysipelas • «t8ot. likeness]. A noncontagious disease resembling erysipelas. It is due to Cladothrix dichotoma. Syn., erysipelas chronicum; erythema migrans.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      erysip'eloid [G. erysipelas + eidos, resemblance.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      erysipeloid (er-is-ip'el-oid) [erysipelas + Gr. cliot form]. An infective dermatitis due to the absorption of putrescent animal matter by the skin: it resembles erysipelas, but is without fever. It is caused by Slreptolkrix rosenbachii.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      erysip'eloid [G. erysipelas + eidos, resemblance.]
  189. erythrasma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      erythrasma (er-ith-ras'-mah) [4pv$p6t, red]. A rare skin disease attacking the axilla.- or inguinal region or the buttocks. Itformsreddish or brownish, sharply denned, slight'y raised, desquamating patches that cause no itching or inconvenience. It is due to Bacillus epidermidis.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      erythrasma (er-ith-raz'mah). A contagious parasitic disease of the skin occurring especially in the groins and axillae, in the form of sharply defined, brownish red, desquamating patches, bordered by a fringe of broken and partly detached epidermis. According to Barensprung, it is due to the presence of the Microsporon minutissimum of Burchardt. Others regard the affection as identical with eczema marginatum. [Gr., erythros, red.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      erythrasma (er-ith-raz'mah) [Gr. kpuBptn red]. A chronic contagious skin disease due to the presence of Micros'poron minutis'simum (Discomyfces minutis'simus). It is marked by the development of red or brownish patches on the inner side of the thigh, on the scrotum, and in the axilla. Baerensprung's e., eczema marginatum affecting the thighs.
  190. erythrochloropia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      erythrochloropia (er-ith-ro-klo-rof-pe-ah) [erythro-; xX«p6t, green; '>-', eye]. A form of subnormal color-perception in which green and red are the only colors correctly distinguished.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      erythrochloropia (er"I-thro-klo-ro'pl-ah) [G. erytkros, red, + chloros, green, + ops(Sp-), eye.] Partial color-blindness with ability to distinguish correctly only red and green.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      erythrochloropia (er"I-thro-klo-ro'pl-ah) [G. erytkros, red, + chloros, green, + ops(Sp-), eye.] Partial color-blindness with ability to distinguish correctly only red and green.
  191. erythrol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      erythrol (cr'-tth-rol) [ipvQpfa. red]. I. C4Ht(OH)«. A crystalline alkaloid from certain algae and lichens. 2. A double salt of bismuth and cinchonidine. It is used in rare forms of dyspepsia in which acid reaction of the gastric juice is accompanied by the production of butyric acid. e. tetranitrite, (CHiONOi)*(CHO. NOi)t, large scales, soluble in alcohol, insoluble in water, exploding on percussion; recommended as a substitute for amyl nitrite and nitroglycerin in angina pectoris, asthma, lead colic, and cardiac affections. Dose i-z gr. (0.03-0.06 Gm).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      er'ythrol. i. Erythrite, eryglucin, a derivative of erythrin found in lichens, 2. Bismuth and cinchonidine iodide; antiseptic, e. tetrani'trate, tetranitrol.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      erythrol (er'ith-roH. See erythrite. e. tctranltratc. Tetranitrol, GHeOuNi. Its action is like that of the nitrites, the vasodilation being slower and more lasting than that of nitroglycerin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      er'ythrol. i. Erythrite, eryglucin, a derivative of erythrin found in lichens, 2. Bismuth and cinchonidine iodide; antiseptic, e. tetrani'trate, tetranitrol.
  192. erythropsia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      erythropsia (er-ith-rop'-se-ah) [erythro-; tya, vision J. An abnormality of vision in which all objects appear red; red vision.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      erythropsia (er-ith-rop'se-ah). A visal disorder which causes all objects to a? pear red. It often follows after daxzlir.j by light reflected from snow. [Gr., erythros, red, + opsis, vision.]
  193. esodic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      esodic (e-sod'-ik) [b, into; 6£6i, way]. Afferent.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      esod'ic [G. es, eis, into, + hodos, way.] Centripetal or afferent, noting sensory nerves conducting impulses toward the spinal cord and brain.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      esodic (es-od'ik). See afferent. [Gr., eso, within, + odos, a way.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      esod'ic [G. es, eis, into, + hodos, way.] Centripetal or afferent, noting sensory nerves conducting impulses toward the spinal cord and brain.
  194. esophagoscope - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      esoph'agoscope [G. shaped, I examine.] A form of endoscope for inspecting the esophagus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      esophagoscope (e-so-fag'os-k6p) [esophagus + Gr. OKoiriiv to view]. An instrument for examining the interior of the esophagus by artificial light.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      esoph'agoscope [G. shaped, I examine.] A form of endoscope for inspecting the esophagus.
  195. esophagoscopy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      esophagos'copy. Inspection of the interior of the esophagus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      esophagoscopy (e-sof-ag-os'ko-pe). The exploration of the esophagus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      esophagos'copy. Inspection of the interior of the esophagus.
  196. esotropia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      esotropia (e-so-tro'-pe-ah) [bra, inward; rpk-rtu>, to turn]. Convergent strabismus.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      esotropia (es-o-tro'pe-ah). Convergent strabismus. [Gr., eso, inward, + trepein, to turn.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      esotropia (es-o-tro'pe-ah) [Gr taw inward + rptrcu> to tum|. A manifest turning inward of the eyes; convergent strabismus, or cross-eye.
  197. espundia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      espundia (es-poon'dl-ah). Naso-oral leishmaniasis, bubas braziliana, Breda's disease, a chronic ulcerative affection of the nose and mouth, caused by Leishmania tropica.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      espundia (es-poon'de-ah). The ulcerative type of dermal leishmaniasis, with secondary manifestations in the nose and mouth, occurring in parts of South America.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      espundia (es-poon'dl-ah). Naso-oral leishmaniasis, bubas braziliana, Breda's disease, a chronic ulcerative affection of the nose and mouth, caused by Leishmania tropica.
  198. esthesiology - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      esthesiology (es-the-zt-ol'-o-je) [n'rf'Vm. a feeling; X*t«. science]. A treatise on- or the science of. the senses.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      esthesiol'ogy [G. aisthlsis, sensation, + -logia.] Science in relation to sensory phenomena.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      esthesiology (es-the-ze-ol'o-je) [Gr. aZoftpm sensation + \v~,o; treatise). The science of sensation and the senses.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      esthesiol'ogy [G. aisthlsis, sensation, + -logia.] Science in relation to sensory phenomena.
  199. esthesiometry - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      esthesiometry (es-the-tc-om'-ct-re) [afotiwm, sensation; n*.,>•>-.. measure]. The measurement or estimation of tactile sensibility.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      esthesiometry (es-the-zK-om'e-tri). Measurement of the degree of tactile or other sensibility.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      esthesiometry (es-the-zK-om'e-tri). Measurement of the degree of tactile or other sensibility.
  200. esthesioneurosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      esthesioneurosis (es-the-se-o-nu-ro'-sis) [aTif^ffw, perception; vtvpoy, nerve]. Any nervous disease in which there are disorders of sensation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      esthe"sioneuro'sis. Any sensory neurosis, such as anesthesia, hyperesthesia, paresthesia, etc.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      esthesioneurosis (es-the"ze-o-nu-ro'sis) [Gr. alnrarasif]. Any disorder of the sensory nerves.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      esthe"sioneuro'sis. Any sensory neurosis, such as anesthesia, hyperesthesia, paresthesia, etc.
  201. estrual - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      estrual (es'-tru-at) [oforpoi, gad-fly]. Pertaining to estruation.
  202. estruation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      estrua'tion. The period of heat in animals.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      estruation (es-tru-a'shun) [L. Gr. olarpot gadfly, rut]. The sexual ardor of animals at the season of copulation; rutting.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      estrua'tion. The period of heat in animals.
  203. estrum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      es'trum. Estrus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      es'trum. Estrus.
  204. estuarium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      estuarium (es-tu-a'-re-um) [aestus, heat), i, A vapor-bath; also a stove designed to apply warm, dry air to all parts of the body at the same time. 2. A tube through which a hot cautery-iron can be passed to the part to be operated upon.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      estua'rium [L. heat.] Vapor bath.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      estua'rium [L. heat.] Vapor bath.
  205. etherin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      etherin (e'ther-in). Etherobacillin, a tuberculous toxin extracted by ether.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      etherin (e'ther-in). A poison extractable by ether from the bodies of tubercle bacilli. Called also etkerobacittin. See bcnzenin, chloroformin, and xylenin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      etherin (e'ther-in). Etherobacillin, a tuberculous toxin extracted by ether.
  206. etherization - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      etherization (e-ther-iz-a'-shun) [ether]. The administration of ether to produce anesthesia. This is effected by inhalation of the vapor.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      etherization (e*ther-i-za'shun). Bringing under the anesthetic influence of ether.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      etherization (e-ther-i-za'shun). The administration of ether vapor for the purpose of producing general anesthesia
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      etherization (e"ther-iz-a'shun). The administration of ether by inhalation, and the consequent production of anesthesia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      etherization (e*ther-i-za'shun). Bringing under the anesthetic influence of ether.
  207. etherize - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      etherize (e'-lher-iz) [ether]. To administer ether.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      etherize (e'ther-Iz). To put under the anesthetic influence of ether.
  208. etheromania - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      etheromania (e-ther-o-ma'-ne-ah) [ether; parfa, madness]. The mania for drinking ether; ether intoxication.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      etheroma'nia [G. dither, ether, + mania, frenzy.] The habitual use of ether as an intoxicant.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      etheromania (e"ther-o-ma'ne-ah). Uncontrollable addiction to the use of ether as a stimulant.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      etheroma'nia [G. dither, ether, + mania, frenzy.] The habitual use of ether as an intoxicant.
  209. eugenin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      eugenin (u'-jen-in). See caryophyUus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      eugenin (u'je-nin). A camphor, ' .il, '». found in cloves, etc.
  210. eugenism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      eugenism (u'jen-izm). " The aggregate of the most favorable conditions for healthy and happy existence." (Galton.)
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      eugenism (u'jen-izm). That condition of heredity and environment which tends to produce healthy and happy existence.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      eugenism (u'jen-izm). " The aggregate of the most favorable conditions for healthy and happy existence." (Galton.)
  211. eunuchism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      eunuchism (fi'-nafc-i'zm). The condition of being a eunuch.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      eunuchism (u'nuk-izm). The symptom-complex caused by the absence of the testicles, pitu'itary e., hypophysis* syndrome.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      eunuchism (u'nuk-izm). The symptom-complex caused by the absence of the testicles, pitu'itary e., hypophysis* syndrome.
  212. eunuchoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      eunuchoid (u'-nuk-oid) [eunuch; Mai,resembling]. Having the characteristics of a eunuch.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      eunuchoid (u'nuk-oyd) [G. eidos, resembling.] Resembling, or having the general characteristics of. a eunuch, u. state, hypogenitalism.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      eunuchoid (u'nuk-oid). i. Noting a fibroid condition of a physiologically inactive testicle; also noting a high-pitched falsetto voice in a man. 2. A cryptorchid person with defective masculinity of appearance, causing him to resemble a eunuch.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      eunuchoid (u'nuk-oyd) [G. eidos, resembling.] Resembling, or having the general characteristics of. a eunuch, u. state, hypogenitalism.
  213. euonymin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      euonymin (fl-on'-tm-tn). A precipitate from the tincture of euonymus; it is tonic, laxative, and expectorant. Dose J-3 gr. (0.032-0.2 Gm.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      euon'ymin. Extractum euonymi siccum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      euonymin (u-on'im-in). i. A resinoid obtained from Euorfymus atropurpi/rca. i. An aperient and cholagogue principle from the same. Dose, J-3 gr. (0.022-o.j gm.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      euon'ymin. Extractum euonymi siccum.
  214. euonymus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      euonymus (A-on'-im-us) [tl&wtux, having a good name]. Wahoo; the bark of E. alropurpurea a mild purgative and cholagogue. e., extract of (exlraclum tuonymi, U. S. P.). Dose i-S gr. (0.065-0.32 Gm.). e., fluidextract of (fluidextractum cuonymi, U. S. P.). Dose 8 min. (0.5 Cc.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      euonymus (u-on'i-mus) [G. eudnymos, from eu, well, + onyma, name, having a good name, lucky.] (N.F.) Euonymi cortex (Br.), the dried root bark of Euonymus atropurpurea, wahoo, burningbush, arrow-wood; employed as an hepatic tonic and laxative in doses of gr. 3-10 (0.2-0.6).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      euonymus (u-on'i-mus) [G. eudnymos, from eu, well, + onyma, name, having a good name, lucky.] (N.F.) Euonymi cortex (Br.), the dried root bark of Euonymus atropurpurea, wahoo, burningbush, arrow-wood; employed as an hepatic tonic and laxative in doses of gr. 3-10 (0.2-0.6).
  215. euplastic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      euplastic (u-plas'-lik) [«i". well; TtAd,in, ( •. to form]. Capable of being transformed into healthy tissue.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      euplas'tic [G. euplastos, easily moulded; eu, well, + plasso, I form.] Healing readily and well.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      euplastic (u-plas'tik) [Gr. «5 well + TrXaaTirtv plastic). Readily becoming organized; adapted to the formation of tissue. •
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      euplas'tic [G. euplastos, easily moulded; eu, well, + plasso, I form.] Healing readily and well.
  216. eurygnathism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      eurygnathism (u-re-nath'-izm). The condition of having large jaws.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      eurygnathism (u-rig'na-thizm) [G. eurys, broad, + gnathos, jaw.] The condition of having a wide jaw.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      eurygnathism (u-rig'na-thizm) [G. eurys, broad, + gnathos, jaw.] The condition of having a wide jaw.
  217. eurythermic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      eurythermic (u-rr-lhcr'-mi!;} [/.•). beat]. Referring to bacteria capable of growing through a wide range of temperature.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      eurythermic (u-rith-er'mik). [Gr. Ivpbt wide + fipfti) heat]. Able to grow through a wide range of temperature: said of bacteria.
  218. eutrophia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      eutrophia (u-tro'fl-ah) [G. eu, well, + trophe, nourishment.] A state of normal nourishment and growth.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      eutrophia (u-trof'e-ah). Good and abundant nutrition. [Gr., eu, well, + trephein, to nourish.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      eutrophia (u-tro'fe-ah). A healthy state of nutrition.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      eutrophia (u-tro'fl-ah) [G. eu, well, + trophe, nourishment.] A state of normal nourishment and growth.
  219. evacuator - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      evacuator (t-rak'-u-a-lor) [evacuate]. An agent to produce emptying, especially an instrument for removing from the bladder fragments of stone after litholapaxy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      evac'uator. A mechanical evacuant, an instrument for the removal of impacted feces from the rectum.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      evacuator (e-vak'u-a-tor). A mechanical device for washing calculous dt'bris out of the bladder in the operation of lithotrity. See litholapajcy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      evacuator (e-vak'u-a-tor). An instrument for compelling an evacuation, as of the bowels or bladder, or for removing fluid or small particles from a cavity.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      evac'uator. A mechanical evacuant, an instrument for the removal of impacted feces from the rectum.
  220. eventration - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      eventration (c-ven-tra'-skun) [e, out; tenter, the hellyl. Protrusion of the abdominal viscera through the abdominal walls.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      eventra'tion [L. e, out, + venter, belly.] i. Protrusion of the bowels through an opening in the abdominal wall. 2. Removal of the contents of the abdominal cavity.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      eventration (e-ven-tra'shun) [L. eventra'tia disembowclment, from e out 4- ven'ler belly). Protrusion of the bowels from the abdomen, whether or not congenital.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      eventra'tion [L. e, out, + venter, belly.] i. Protrusion of the bowels through an opening in the abdominal wall. 2. Removal of the contents of the abdominal cavity.
  221. eviration - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      eviration (ev-ir-a'-shun) tevirare, to castrate). I. Castration. 2. Emasculation. 3. A form of sexual perversion in which there is a deep and permanent assumption of feminine qualities, with corresponding loss of manly qualities. The opposite of this is termed defemination.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      eviration (e-vi-ra'shun) [L. e, out, + vir, man.] i. Castration 2. Loss or absence of the mental and physical characteristics of the male; effemulation.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      eviration (e-vi-ra'shun) [L. e, out, + vir, man.] i. Castration 2. Loss or absence of the mental and physical characteristics of the male; effemulation.
  222. evulsion - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      evulsion Ir-rul'-sknn) [evellere, to pluck out]. The. forcible tearing or plucking away of a part.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      evul'sion [L. evulsio; evellere, to pluck out.] The forcible tearing away of a partor of a new growth.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      evulsion (e-vul'shun). Forcible extraction. [Lat., e, out, + vellere, to push.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      evulsion (e-vul'shun) [L. evui'sio, from e out + ;r/7,7, to pluck]. The plucking or tearing out, as of a polypus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      evul'sion [L. evulsio; evellere, to pluck out.] The forcible tearing away of a partor of a new growth.
  223. exalgin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      exalgin (eks-al'-jin) [it,out; u.v,oi, pain], CiHuNO. Methylacetanilide; a benzene derivative allied to phenacetin. It is an analgesic and antipyretic in doses of from }-4 gr. (0.032-0.26 Gm.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      exalgin (ex-al'jin) [Gr. 4£ out + «X-yos pain]. Methylacetanilid, < '.II ,\<). a benzene derivative: it is used as an analgesic and antipyretic. Dose, j-4 gr. (0.033-0.26 gm.).
  224. exanthematous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      exanthematous (eks-an-them'-at-us) [exanthem]. Of the nature of or characterized by exanthem or eruption; of the nature of an eruptive fever.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      exanthem'atous. Relating to an exanthema, «. disease, exanthema (i).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      exanthematous (ex-an-them'at-us). Pertaining to, characterized by, or of the nature of an exanthem.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      exanthem'atous. Relating to an exanthema, «. disease, exanthema (i).
  225. exarticulation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      exarticulation (eks-ar-tik-u-la'-shun) [ex: articulus, joint], z. Dislocation of a joint. 2. Amputation at a joint.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      exarticula'tion [L. ex, out, + articulus, joint.] Amputation of a limb through one of the joints.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      exarticulation (ex"ar-tik-u-la'shun) [L. ex out + artic'tilus joint]. Amputation at a joint.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      exarticula'tion [L. ex, out, + articulus, joint.] Amputation of a limb through one of the joints.
  226. excern - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      excern (ek-sern') [excemere, to sift out]. To excrete.
  227. excernant - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      excernant (ex-ser'nant). See excretory. [Lat., excernere, to sift out.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      excernant (ex-ser'nant) [L. excer'nere to excrete, to purge]. Causing an evacuation or discharge.
  228. excitor - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      exci'tor. That which excites to increased action, a stimulant, e. nerve, a nerve conducting impulses which stimulate to increased function.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      exci'tor. That which excites to increased action, a stimulant, e. nerve, a nerve conducting impulses which stimulate to increased function.
  229. excrementitious - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      excrementitious (eks-kre-men-lish'-us). Pertaining to excrement.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      excrementitious (eks-kre-men-tl'shus). Relating to any cast out waste material.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      excrementitious (eks-kre-men-tl'shus). Relating to any cast out waste material.
  230. excretin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ex'cretin. A crystalline compound found in feces.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      excretin (ex'kre-tin). A crystalline compound, CjoHanO, derivable from human feces.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ex'cretin. A crystalline compound found in feces.
  231. excystation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      excystation (eks'sis-ta'shun) [L. ex, out of, + cyst.] Removal from a cyst, noting the action of certain encysted organisms in escaping from their envelope.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      excystation (ex-sis-ta'shun). Escape from a cyst or envelope.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      excystation (eks'sis-ta'shun) [L. ex, out of, + cyst.] Removal from a cyst, noting the action of certain encysted organisms in escaping from their envelope.
  232. exencephalus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      exencephalus (eks-en-sef'-al-us) [ex; /•,•.,..'.« ,w. brain]. A species of monsters characterized by a malformed brain, situated without the cranial cavity.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      exenceph'alus. A monster with the brain more or less outside of the cranial cavity
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      exencephalus (ex-en-sefal-us) [Gr. if out + fry»«oi.\o\ brain]. A monster having an imperfect cranium, with the brain on the outside of the skull.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      exenceph'alus. A monster with the brain more or less outside of the cranial cavity
  233. exenteritis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      exenteritis (eks-en-ter-i'-lis) [((,out; ii-r,,,,,,-. bowel; trti, inflammation]. Inflammation of the outer or peritoneal coat of the intestine.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      exenteri'tis (eks-en-ter-i'(e') tis) [G. exo, on the outside, + enteritis.] Inflammation of the peritoneal covering of the intestine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      exenteri'tis (eks-en-ter-i'(e') tis) [G. exo, on the outside, + enteritis.] Inflammation of the peritoneal covering of the intestine.
  234. exesion - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      exesion (eks-e"-shun) [exedere, to corrode!. The gradual superficial destruction of organic parts, particularly bone, in consequence of abscesses and other destroying agencies.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      exesion (ex-e'zhun) [L. exe'dere to eat out]. The gradual destruction of superficial parts of a tissue.
  235. exfetation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      exfetation (eks-fe-ta'-shun) [exfelotio]. Ectopic or extrauterine fetation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      exfeta'tion [L. ex, out, + fetus.] Extrauterine pregnancy, ectopic gestation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      exfetation (ex-fe-ta'shun) [L. ex out + faftus]. Extra-uterine pregnancy.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      exfeta'tion [L. ex, out, + fetus.] Extrauterine pregnancy, ectopic gestation.
  236. exflagellation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      exflagellation (cx-flaj-cl-a'-shun). The act of extruding actively motile chromatin threads from the body of a male malarial parasite.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      exflagellation (ex-fiaj-el-a'shun) [L. ex out + Jlagcl'lum]. The protrusion or formation of flagella by a protozoon.
  237. exhilarant - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      exhilarant (ek-zil'-ar-ant) [exhilarare, to cheer]. An agent to enliven and cheer the mind. e. gas, nitrous oxide gas.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      exhilarant (eg-zil'er-ant). Mentally stimulating.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      exhilarant (ex-hil'ar-ant) [L. exhila're to gladden], i. Causing elevation or gladness, 2. An enlivening or elating agent.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      exhilarant (eg-zil'er-ant). Mentally stimulating.
  238. exocrin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ex'ocrin [G. exo, out of, + krino, I separate.] External secretion of a gland.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      exocrin (exVkrin) [Gr. {{u without + kpivtiv to separate]. The external secretion of a gland.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ex'ocrin [G. exo, out of, + krino, I separate.] External secretion of a gland.
  239. exodic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      exodic (eks-od'-ik) [exo-; W6i, a way]. Transmitting impulses outward from the central nervous system; efferent; centrifugal.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      exod'ic [G exS, out, + hodos, way.] Proceeding toward the periphery, efferent, centrifugal.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      exodic (ex-od'ik) [Gr. t(u out + dS6t way]. Centrifugal or efferent.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      exod'ic [G exS, out, + hodos, way.] Proceeding toward the periphery, efferent, centrifugal.
  240. exogastritis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      exogastritis (eks-o-gas-tri'-tis) [exo-; yaaTrtp, belly; int. inflammation]. See perigcatritts.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      exogastritis (eks-o-gas-tri'(tre')tis). Inflammation of the peritoneal coat of the stomach.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      exogastritis (ex"o-gas-tri'tis). Inflammation of the external coat of the stomach.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      exogastritis (eks-o-gas-tri'(tre')tis). Inflammation of the peritoneal coat of the stomach.
  241. exogen - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      exogen (ex'o-gen). A plant in which the stem grows in successive layers. The exogens form the larger of the two classes into which phamogamous plants are divided. See endogen.
  242. exogenetic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      exogenetic (eks-o-jen-et'-ik) [exo-; ytrvar, to produce]. Due to an external cause; not arising within the organism.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      exogenet'ic [G. exd, outside, + genesis, generation.] Exogenous.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      exogenetic (cx"o-jen-et'ik) [Gr. i£u outward + yervav to produce). Not arising within the organism, but due to an external cause.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      exogenet'ic [G. exd, outside, + genesis, generation.] Exogenous.
  243. exomphalos - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      exomphalos (eks-om'-fal-os) [exo-; 6p^a\Ai, navel]. Undue prominence of the navel; also, umbilical hernia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      exomphalos (eks-om'fa-lus) [G. ex, out, + omphalos, umbilicus.] Exumbilication. I. Protrusion of the umbilicus. 2. Umbilical hernia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      exomphalos (eks-om'fa-lus) [G. ex, out, + omphalos, umbilicus.] Exumbilication. I. Protrusion of the umbilicus. 2. Umbilical hernia.
  244. exophoria - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      exophoria (eks-o-fo'-re-ah). See heterophoria.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      exophoria (eks-o-fo'ri-ah) [G. ex6, outward, + phora, movement.] A tendency of one eye to deviate outward, divergent squint.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      exophoria (ex-o-fo're-ah). A tendency toward an outward deviation of the axis of the eye. [Gr., exo, outward, + pilerein, to bear.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      exophoria (eks-o-fo'ri-ah) [G. ex6, outward, + phora, movement.] A tendency of one eye to deviate outward, divergent squint.
  245. exophthalmia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      exophthalmia (cks-ojf-thal'-me-ah). See exophthalmos.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      exophthal'mia. Abnormal protrusion of the eyeball, e. cachectlca. See exophthalmic goiter, e. fnngosa. A late stage of glioma retinae, after the malignant growth has filled the eyeball and caused a perforation of the cornea or anterior portion of the sclera. The growth then protrudes, proliferates very rapidly, and gives a fungous appearance to the front of the eyeball. [Gr., ex, out, + ophthalmos, the eye.]
  246. exotospore - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      exotospore (cks-o-to-spdr) [4£ruAt, outward; ,r,i,',,„.«, seed]. The malarial germ brought by the stab of the mosquito (Anopheles) into the human blood-vessels; so named from being formed outside the human body.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      exotospore (ex-o'to-spor). The needleshaped form of the spore of the malarial parasite which is introduced by the agency of the mosquito into the human body.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      exotospore (ex-o'to-spor). The needle-like spore (sporozoite) of the malarial parasite by which it enters the blood-corpuscle. Called also oxyspore and raphidiospore.
  247. expiscation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      expiscation (ex-pis-ka'shun). The long-continued study of symptoms for diagnostic purposes.
  248. exsanguine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      exsanguine (ek sang'-gvtin) [ex, out; sanguis, blood]. Bloodless.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      exsanguine (ek-sang'gwin). Bloodless, anemic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      exsanguine (ek-sang'gwin). Bloodless, anemic.
  249. exsection - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      exsection (ek-sek'-shun) [ex; secare, to cut]. The act of cutting a part out from its surroundings.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      exsec'tion. Excision, the cutting out of a portion of bone, of an organ, or of any tissue or part.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      exsec'tion. Excision, the cutting out of a portion of bone, of an organ, or of any tissue or part.
  250. exsiccant - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      exsic'cant [L. exsiccare, to dry out.] i. Drying, absorbing a discharge. 2. A dusting or drying powder.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      exsic'cant [L. exsiccare, to dry out.] i. Drying, absorbing a discharge. 2. A dusting or drying powder.
  251. exsiccation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      exsiccation (ek-sik-a'-shun) [ex; siccus, dry). The act of drying; especially the depriving of a crystalline substance of its water of crystallization.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      exsicca'tion. The process of drying.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      exsiccation (ex-sik-a'shun) [L. ex out I sic'cus dry]. The act of drying; the deprival of a crystalline substance of its water of crystallization.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      exsicca'tion. The process of drying.
  252. exstrophy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      exstrophy (ek'-strof-e) [ex; erptytiv, to turn]. Bversion; the turning inside out of a part. e. of bladder, a congenital condition in which the lower part of the abdominal wall, the anterior wall of the bladder, and usually the symphysis pubia are wanting, and the posterior wall of the bladder is pressed through the opening. »
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ex'strophy [G. ex, out, + strophe, a turning.] A congenital turning out or aversion of a hollow organ, e. of the bladder, a congenital absence of the anterior wall of the bladder and of the abdominal wall in front of it, the posterior wall of the bladder being exposed.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      exstrophy (ex'stro-fe). i. That state of a hollow organ in which it is turned inside out. 2. A malformation in which the interior of a hollow organ (e. g., the bladder) is exposed by a defect of the abdorr.inal wall. 3. Of the eyelid, see ectrofto*. [Gr., ex, outward, + strephein, to turn ]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      exstrophy (ex'strc-fe) [Gr. t{ out + arptiftw to turn]. The congenital eversion or turning inside out of an organ, as the bladder, e. of the bladder, a congenital malformation in which, from deficiency of the abdominal wall and bladder, the latter organ appears to be turned inside out, having the internal surface of the posterior wall showing through the opening in the anterior wall.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ex'strophy [G. ex, out, + strophe, a turning.] A congenital turning out or aversion of a hollow organ, e. of the bladder, a congenital absence of the anterior wall of the bladder and of the abdominal wall in front of it, the posterior wall of the bladder being exposed.
  253. exteroceptive - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      exteroceptive (eks*ter-o-sep'tiv) [L. exterus, outside, + capere, to take.] Relating to the exteroceptors, noting the surface of the body containing the end-organs adapted to receive impressions or stimuli from without.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      exteroceptive (ex"ter-o-sep'tiv). Sherrington's term for the external surface field of distribution of receptor organs. See interoup&te, proprioceptivc, and receptor.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      exteroceptive (eks*ter-o-sep'tiv) [L. exterus, outside, + capere, to take.] Relating to the exteroceptors, noting the surface of the body containing the end-organs adapted to receive impressions or stimuli from without.
  254. exteroceptor - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      exteroceptor (eks-ter-o-sep'-tor) [extero; receptor, receiver]. An end organ, in or near, the skin or a mucous membrane, which receives stimuli from the external world.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      exteroceptor (eks"ter-o-sep'tor) [L. exterus, external, + receptor, receiver.] One of the peripheral endorgans of the afferent nerves in or immediately under the skin or external mucous membrane, which respond to stimulation by external agents.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      exteroceptor (ex"ter-o-sep'tor). Sherrington's name for terminal sense organs (receptors) which receive stimuli acting on the organism from without; the receptors which are situated in the ectodermal covering of the body. See inleroceptor.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      exteroceptor (eks"ter-o-sep'tor) [L. exterus, external, + receptor, receiver.] One of the peripheral endorgans of the afferent nerves in or immediately under the skin or external mucous membrane, which respond to stimulation by external agents.
  255. extrabuccal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      extrabucc'al. Outside of the mouth.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      extrabuccal (ex-trah-buk'al). Outside of the mouth.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      extrabucc'al. Outside of the mouth.
  256. extractum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      extractum (ex-trak'tum). See extract. c. aetlieruni. Of the Br. Ph., an oleoresin. e. aromatlcum. An extract made by exhausting aromatic powder with alcohol, e. (In hi n in. See fluidextract. e. liquldum. See fluidextract. e. sicI'niii. A dry extract; an extract which can be reduced to a powder, e. spirituo.-.iiin. See alcoholic extract, e. spissum. An extract so thick that it will not run [Ger. Ph.]. e. tenue. An extract of the consistence of honey.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      extractum (ex-trak'tum) [L., from ex out + Ira'here to draw]. An extract.
  257. extradural - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      extradural (eks-trah-du'-ral) [extra-; durus, hard]. Situated outside of the dura.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      extradural (ex-trah-du'ral). Situated or occurring outside the dura mater.
  258. extramarginal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      extramarginal (ex"trah-mar/jin-al). Below the limit of consciousness.
  259. extrasomatic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      extrasomatic (ek"strah-so-mat'ik). Outside of, or unrelated to, the body.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      extrasomatic (ex"trab-so-mat'ik). Unconnected with the body.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      extrasomatic (ek"strah-so-mat'ik). Outside of, or unrelated to, the body.
  260. extravaginal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      extravaginal (eks-trah-vajl-nal). Outside of the vagina.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      extravaginal (ex-trah-vaj'in-al). Outside of the vagina or of a sheath.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      extravaginal (eks-trah-vajl-nal). Outside of the vagina.
  261. extremitas - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      extremitas (ex-trcm'it-as). Latin for extremity.
  262. exumbilication - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      exumbilication (ex"um-bil-e-ka'shun) [L. ex out + umbilicus}, i. Marked protrusion of the navel. 2. Umbilical hernia.
  263. eye-tooth - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      eye-tooth (i'tooth). An upper canine tooth.