User:Visviva/NYT 20070517

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words, lacking English entries in the English Wiktionary as of the most recent database dump, found in the 2007-05-17 issue of the New York Times (2009-02-04).

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103486 tokens ‧ 76238 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 9308 types ‧ 52 (~ 0.559%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-05-17[edit]

  1. afoxe
    • 2007 May 17, Ben Ratliff, “Cuban Music, Good for Dancing, and for Thinking About as Well”, New York Times:
      It now brings together son, guajira, guaracha with New Orleans funk, Nigerian Afrobeat, South American cumbia, James Brown rhythms, Haitian compas, Brazilian afoxe, New York City boogaloo and even jam-band stuff predicated on electric guitars as much as hand drums.
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  2. anchormate
    • 2007 May 17, Bill Carter, “As the Networks Order New Shows, Fox Moves to Consolidate Its Gains”, New York Times:
      At the top of that list are the team of Kelsey Grammer (“Frasier”) and Patricia Heaton (“Everybody Loves Raymond”) who are in a new comedy called “Back to You.” Mr. Grammer plays a television news anchorman who loses his job in Los Angeles and is forced to return to Pittsburgh and his old station — and old anchormate and romantic partner, Ms. Heaton.
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  3. basepaths
  4. bridgelike
  5. clothbound
    • 2007 May 17, Charles Mcgrath, “Magazine Suspends Its Run in History”, New York Times:
      They also published in clothbound, hardback volumes with full-color paintings mounted on the front.
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  6. compas *
    • 2007 May 17, Ben Ratliff, “Cuban Music, Good for Dancing, and for Thinking About as Well”, New York Times:
      It now brings together son, guajira, guaracha with New Orleans funk, Nigerian Afrobeat, South American cumbia, James Brown rhythms, Haitian compas, Brazilian afoxe, New York City boogaloo and even jam-band stuff predicated on electric guitars as much as hand drums.
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  7. cooktop
    • 2007 May 17, Michael Hsu, “High, Low and in Between”, New York Times:
      GE, for example, supercharged its Monogram Electronic Induction Cooktop with a 3,700-watt heating element — the most powerful induction cooktop on the market (available in September for $1,849 to $2,649; for dealers, geappliances.com ).
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  8. cumbia
    • 2007 May 17, Ben Ratliff, “Cuban Music, Good for Dancing, and for Thinking About as Well”, New York Times:
      It now brings together son, guajira, guaracha with New Orleans funk, Nigerian Afrobeat, South American cumbia, James Brown rhythms, Haitian compas, Brazilian afoxe, New York City boogaloo and even jam-band stuff predicated on electric guitars as much as hand drums.
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  9. cyclosarin
  10. disorientations
    • 2007 May 17, Jon Pareles, “Shimmering Anthems to the Apocalypse”, New York Times:
      The band’s music harks back to the insurgent disorientations of 1980s and ’90s alternative rock: the guitar clangor of Sonic Youth, the whipsaw dynamics (and crazed male/ cool female vocal dialogues) of the Pixies and the sullen power-chord marches of grunge, along with some echoes (literal and stylistic) of 1970s space-rock.
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  11. farmacia *
    • 2007 May 17, Mike Albo, “A Bright Future in Shades”, New York Times:
      The last pair I had were plastic shades from a farmacia in Mexico.
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  12. footgear
    • 2007 May 17, Ruth La Ferla, “The Lower (Far) East Side”, New York Times:
      Pouring into this grotty swath of Manhattan from cities as far-flung as Tokyo, Singapore and Seoul, they take time to sample local confections like green tea tiramisù and to show off a style that is largely defined by wild-child hair and incongruously fancy footgear.
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  13. fuzzballs
    • 2007 May 17, Christine Pittel, “All Cooped Up in a Manhattan Co-op”, New York Times:
      The dark little fuzzballs — Black Silkies, Tiziana guessed, a breed that Marco Polo encountered in the Far East — were skittering through the scratch and boldly pecking at the cardboard walls.
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  14. gossipmonger
  15. guajira *
    • 2007 May 17, Ben Ratliff, “Cuban Music, Good for Dancing, and for Thinking About as Well”, New York Times:
      It now brings together son, guajira, guaracha with New Orleans funk, Nigerian Afrobeat, South American cumbia, James Brown rhythms, Haitian compas, Brazilian afoxe, New York City boogaloo and even jam-band stuff predicated on electric guitars as much as hand drums.
      add
  16. guaracha
    • 2007 May 17, Ben Ratliff, “Cuban Music, Good for Dancing, and for Thinking About as Well”, New York Times:
      It now brings together son, guajira, guaracha with New Orleans funk, Nigerian Afrobeat, South American cumbia, James Brown rhythms, Haitian compas, Brazilian afoxe, New York City boogaloo and even jam-band stuff predicated on electric guitars as much as hand drums.
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  17. hitless
  18. homecourt
  19. hypermilitarized
    • 2007 May 17, Michael O'Hanlon, “A Defense We Just Don’t Need (Yet)”, New York Times:
      But the fact of the matter is that Russia does object to the plan, many European allies are nervous, and the whole idea could reinforce the global image of the United States as a hypermilitarized, go-it-alone superpower.
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  20. insightfully
  21. kbps
    • 2007 May 17, J. D. Biersdorfer, “Pros and Cons of Web-Based Mail”, New York Times:
      Songs encoded at higher bit rates, like 256 kilobits per second (kbps), include more audio data from the original track and can sound fuller and have better fidelity, but take up more hard drive space because the files are bigger.
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  22. minimovies
  23. multipanel
    • 2007 May 17, Miguel Helft, “Google’s One-Stop Search to Yield Text and Images”, New York Times:
      In December, Ask.com unveiled an experimental service called Ask X, which shows results in a multipanel display that makes it easy to expand or narrow queries and search for videos or audio.
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  24. noncompete
    • 2007 May 17, Landon Thomas Jr., “Parallel Paths Diverging Sharply”, New York Times:
      Subjected to a barrage of pointed questions by Mr. Black’s lawyer, she admitted to missing some board meetings, to not being a financial expert as defined by new Sarbanes-Oxley requirements for audit committee members, and most crucially, to not having read parts of documents that disclosed the noncompete payments made to Mr. Black.
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  25. nonemployee
    • 2007 May 17, Damon Darlin, “Design Helps H.P. Profit More on PCs”, New York Times:
      The company’s broad results for the quarter had been given as “guidance” to investors on May 8 after an employee inadvertently released financial information to a nonemployee.
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  26. overfunded
  27. premerger
  28. prestart
  29. railyards
    • 2007 May 17, Charles V. Bagli, “Biggest Building Site in Manhattan Up for Auction”, New York Times:
      Although the Bloomberg administration failed to win legislative support to build the football stadium over the railyards in 2005, it did succeed in a more far-reaching goal: rezoning a wide swath of the West Side, including 45 blocks outside the railyards, for large-scale development.
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  30. reauditing
    • 2007 May 17, Barnaby J. Feder, “Bausch & Lomb Accepts $4.5 Billion Takeover Bid”, New York Times:
      On top of its marketing woes, Bausch has been struggling for more than a year to finish reauditing its books for reported accounting irregularities in overseas operations and has sought repeated extensions from federal regulators for filing of financial reports.
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  31. repat
    • 2007 May 17, Sophia Kishkovsky, “2 Russian Churches, Split by War, Reuniting”, New York Times:
      One of the most important things you can do as a repat is to help in the reunification of the churches, much more so than anything you’re doing in television or business.
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  32. salvias
    • 2007 May 17, Anne Raver, “Danger: Plant Sales Ahead”, New York Times:
      When we got to the gate, they were already leaving, trundling wagons of plants to their own vans: heirloom roses, potted lilacs, salvias, Japanese maples, dozens of young herbs, vegetable and flower seedlings.
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  33. seasonwide
    • 2007 May 17, Jacques Steinberg, “Charles Gibson Enjoys a Second Wind on ABC”, New York Times:
      But those seasonwide figures mask a swing in momentum, and thus perception, that has occurred during the last four months.
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  34. semitragic
    • 2007 May 17, Penelope Green, “The Dream of Absolute Quiet”, New York Times:
      JONATHAN PRAGER is a 40-something Manhattan comedian and singer whose life experience and worldview, like those of many other comedians, are semitragic.
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  35. sergianstvo
    • 2007 May 17, Sophia Kishkovsky, “2 Russian Churches, Split by War, Reuniting”, New York Times:
      The core of the churches’ differences lay in the Russian Orthodox Church’s fealty to the Soviet state, a policy known as sergianstvo, after Metropolitan Sergius, the acting head of the church in 1927.
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  36. situps
    • 2007 May 17, Stephanie Rosenbloom, “Mr. Right, It Turns Out, Does Not Take Classes”, New York Times:
      She plunged into tennis, running, sailing, horseback riding, fitness boot camp and scuba diving classes, assuming that somewhere between the situps and the strapping on of fins she might meet some eligible prospects.
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  37. snacklike
    • 2007 May 17, Peter Wayner, “Internet Meets Large Screen”, New York Times:
      Unlike the established television networks, which serve up 30-minute meals of programming, video-sharing Web sites are nurturing a world of snacklike shorts.
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  38. sobor
    • 2007 May 17, Sophia Kishkovsky, “2 Russian Churches, Split by War, Reuniting”, New York Times:
      A major obstacle fell in 2000, when a large church council, or sobor, of the Russian Orthodox Church canonized Czar Nicholas II and his family and hundreds of victims of Stalinist terror, something the church abroad had done in 1981.
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  39. stewarding
    • 2007 May 17, Eric O’Keefe, “Executive Pay Proposals Rejected at AMR”, New York Times:
      Some spoke of bitterness and betrayal, while others commended management for stewarding the company back to profitability from the brink of bankruptcy.
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  40. strawlike
    • 2007 May 17, Amy Virshup, “Newly Released”, New York Times:
      “He had strawlike hair and scruffy clothes.
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  41. thistlelike
    • 2007 May 17, Anne Raver, “Danger: Plant Sales Ahead”, New York Times:
      I HAD never seen such a flower before: a thistlelike blossom with so many golden-orange florets jutting willy-nilly out of its head that it had the look of a rakish pineapple, or Dorothy Lamour on the road.
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  42. unlocatable
  43. unspontaneous
    • 2007 May 17, Alastair Macaulay, “Two Old Masters, Partnered Perhaps With New Ones”, New York Times:
      The Robbins ballet on this program is “Moves” (1959), always self-conscious and unspontaneous in the sequences it sets to silence, yet still a striking example of Robbins’s sure theatricality: The eye and the mind are held fast.
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  44. unsteeped
  45. unswayable
    • 2007 May 17, Michael O'Hanlon, “A Defense We Just Don’t Need (Yet)”, New York Times:
      Just because Mr. Putin has been unswayable on the subject doesn’t mean his successor will also be unreasonable.
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  46. upfronts
  47. wandlike

Sequestered[edit]

  1. freakonomic
    • 2007 May 17, Mike Albo, “A Bright Future in Shades”, New York Times:
      I went to Selima Optique, the eclectic eyewear outfitter with a corner store on Wooster and Broome Streets, with the idea that maybe, by some freakonomic principle, if I bought more expensive sunglasses, I would hold on to them for longer than a month.
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  2. schmality