User:Visviva/NYT 20070812

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-08-12 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-11).

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168897 tokens ‧ 123511 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 12705 types ‧ 80 (~ 0.63%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-08-12[edit]

  1. apocalyptical
2007 August 12, Marilyn Stasio, “Dark Water”, New York Times:
When it finally moves on, “the damage in New Orleans,” Detective Dave Robicheaux remarks, is “of a kind we associate with apocalyptical images from the Bible.”

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  1. awhirl
2007 August 12, “The Week Ahead: Aug. 12-Aug. 18”, New York Times:
Lincoln Center will be awhirl with dance.

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  1. ayurvedic
2007 August 12, Joshua Kurlantzick, “Riding the Velvet Rails”, New York Times:
The Deccan includes a spa room, where you can sample local ayurvedic massage and steam baths as the train rolls on.

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  1. barrelhead
2007 August 12, Richard Brookhiser, “Land Grab”, New York Times:
Kluger has the same subject, though he thinks the process was much darker, accomplished by “daring, cunning, bullying, bluff and bluster, treachery, robbery, quick talk, double-talk, noble principles, stubborn resolve, low-down expediency, cash on the barrelhead and, when deemed necessary, spilled blood.”

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  1. blockfront
2007 August 12, Christopher Gray, “Where the Name Says It All”, New York Times:
Apartment construction came in a flood in the 1890s, with buildings like the 11-story Majestic apartment hotel built on the blockfront from 71st to 72nd Streets in 1894.

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  1. breadwinning
2007 August 12, Christine Haughney, “Buy Low, Divorce High”, New York Times:
Or a breadwinning spouse might recognize that even after dividing community property, it will be possible to live well as a single person.

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  1. brut *
2007 August 12, Howard G. Goldberg, “Chilled, for Dog Days”, New York Times:
This brut nonvintage crémant — a French sparkler made outside the Champagne region — is a masterly blend of pinot noir and chardonnay.

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  1. calorias *
2007 August 12, Ethan Watters, “Suffering Differently”, New York Times:
Salvadoran female refugees who endured the protracted civil war often experienced calorias, a feeling of intense heat in their bodies.

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  1. carlike
2007 August 12, Nick Kurczewski, “Outlander an Outlier No Longer”, New York Times:
Redesigned for 2007, the Outlander combines carlike dynamics, S.U.V.-lite styling and a reasonable price tag — as long as you don’t get carried away with big-ticket option packages.

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  1. cohabiter
2007 August 12, Randy Cohen, “Visiting Justice”, New York Times:
Should we visit her and her cohabiter du jour?

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  1. counterintuitiveness
2007 August 12, Michael Fitzgerald, “It Takes Deep Pockets to Fight Global Warming”, New York Times:
But John Latham, a senior research associate at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, said that there was simply no money for geoengineering, possibly because there’s a certain counterintuitiveness to shooting particles into the atmosphere.

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  1. delegitimizing
2007 August 12, Christopher Caldwell, “Not Being There”, New York Times:
Leadership is intellectually delegitimizing, and yet leaders require intellectual legitimacy.

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  1. domelike
2007 August 12, Dave Itzkoff, “Charm the Children, Tickle the Parents”, New York Times:
If they can imagine him a few years younger and a few pounds lighter, wearing a yellow jumpsuit and a domelike red hat, they may recognize him as Mark Mothersbaugh , the lead singer of the new-wave band Devo.

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  1. eruv
2007 August 12, Jake Mooney, “A Slender Thread to Knit a Neighborhood”, New York Times:
“We live in a day and age,” he continued, “where if you don’t have an eruv, you’re taking yourself off of many people’s lists.”

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  1. eruvs
2007 August 12, Jake Mooney, “A Slender Thread to Knit a Neighborhood”, New York Times:
The city is home to other eruvs — a large one in Manhattan was extended this year from Midtown to Houston Street — and many are in predominantly Jewish areas.

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  1. exploitationer
2007 August 12, Dwight Garner, “Inside the List”, New York Times:
Somewhat crude occult exploitationer about a little girl who is possessed by a devil.

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  1. fleetfooted
2007 August 12, Andrew Gensler, “Dancing Away the Heartache, Tacos Included”, New York Times:
It would take a few more beers, but when the liquid courage kicked in, his wobbly legs were unable to keep pace with the fleetfooted waitress, who rolled her eyes, smiling, and finally twirled away.

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  1. flowboarders
2007 August 12, The Associated Press, “Making Waves, and Riding Them”, New York Times:
About 80 flowboarders ranging in age from 10 to 50 will emerge from 23 regional competitions to be at the national competition Sept. 22 in San Diego.

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  1. flowboarding
2007 August 12, The Associated Press, “Making Waves, and Riding Them”, New York Times:
The paycheck comes with bonuses: access to the wave and pioneer status in flowboarding.

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  1. gots
2007 August 12, Emily Brady, “Doused for the Lord”, New York Times:
“All you gots to do,” instructed a man standing nearby, “is stand there and let the heavens open.”

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  1. greenhead
2007 August 12, Pam Belluck, “Nantucket’s Medical Mr. Fix-It for Whatever Happens to Ail You”, New York Times:
Fascinated with the island’s bugs that cause Lyme disease and other illnesses, he traps greenhead flies, and plucks ticks off deer that hunters shoot, shipping bottled bugs to mainland researchers.

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  1. guzheng *
2007 August 12, Brooke Hauser, “The Rainbow Runway”, New York Times:
Other contestants plucked a Chinese table harp called the guzheng, demonstrated calligraphy and booty-danced to Beyoncé .

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  1. hagwon
2007 August 12, Fred A. Bernstein, “A House to Grow Into”, New York Times:
Geneho, whose bedroom faces the street, is attending a hagwon, a Korean tutoring program.

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  1. lowriders
2007 August 12, Kristen Hall-Geisler, “Museums Get Lively With Sleepovers and Films”, New York Times:
The San Diego museum invited the community in for its recent lowriders show.

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  1. marketwide
2007 August 12, Mark Hulbert, “The Insiders Aren’t So Bearish, After All”, New York Times:
When insiders exercise the options and then sell the shares they receive, typically only the sales will show up in the ratio of marketwide insider sales to purchases.

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  1. midlives
2007 August 12, Curtis Pesmen, “As Survivors, We Were Closer Than Lovers”, New York Times:
Now we were writing, talking, sharing bits of our lives again, glad that both of us were able to talk about our midlives (which we realized could very well have been our late lives).

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  1. moblike
2007 August 12, Dennis Lim, “Same Old Aliens, but New Neuroses”, New York Times:
In the opposing view the pod people, who may be blank but also exhibit moblike tendencies, are seen to embody the blandness of Eisenhower-era America or worse yet the persecution mania of McCarthyism.

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  1. multicharacter
2007 August 12, Mark Blankenship, “It May Look Like Chaos, but It’s the Fringe”, New York Times:
More common, he said, were “broad multicharacter solos,” “one-joke pop-culture homages” and “other plays that serve as reminders that when you take a bunch of inexperienced artists and give them only a few hours of onstage rehearsal time, the results won’t always be pretty.”

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  1. multistop
2007 August 12, Barry Rehfeld, “Now, Even Those Temporary Wheels Can Be Greener”, New York Times:
But he still likes to take the wheel for occasional multistop spins around town, for hundred-mile drives to a vacation home on Long Island and for business trips when he’s in California.

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  1. muralism
2007 August 12, Carol Kino, “Cybermural: The Web as the Wall”, New York Times:
With its pumped-up colors, a focus on everyday lives made heroic and its status as an essentially public artwork, “Departures” strongly suggests a new twist on the Los Angeles muralism of the 1970s, a movement born from the Chicano civil rights movement when Mexican-American artists like Judy Baca, David Rivas Botello and Willie Herrón adapted the Mexican muralist tradition for their own time.

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  1. nonluxury
2007 August 12, Cheryl Jensen, “Lexus-Level Dependability, Now Available at Lower Prices”, New York Times:
Still, for consumers who cannot afford a luxury vehicle, the good news is that the gap between luxury and nonluxury brands has been narrowing and will continue to diminish, Mr. Ivers said.

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  1. nonpatronizing
2007 August 12, Dave Itzkoff, “Charm the Children, Tickle the Parents”, New York Times:
More recently, as Mr. Jacobs and his creative partner, Scott Schultz, 35, crossed over into that decidedly uncool full-time occupation known as parenthood, they were disappointed with the children’s programming they watched, which seemed to lack the freewheeling spirit and nonpatronizing voice of shows they grew up with, like “Sesame Street” and “The Electric Company.”

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  1. noticer
2007 August 12, Darin Strauss, “Old School”, New York Times:
Antrim can be a world-class noticer of the small detail, of a high-schooler’s “cheeks feverish with acne”; the “warm, woolly calm” brought on by Percocet.

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  1. overconcussed
2007 August 12, Charles Mcgrath, “Children’s Books”, New York Times:
To diversify, he also gets Lawn Boy to invest in a kindly but possibly overconcussed prizefighter named Joseph Powdermilk Jr., a k a Joey Pow, who comes in handy when a bad guy called Rock tries to muscle in on the lawn business.

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  1. pallidum
2007 August 12, Sarah Kershaw, “Syphilis Cases on the Increase in New York City”, New York Times:
There is debate over when syphilis, caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum, first appeared, but historians said it became a global plague in the 16th century.

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  1. parodistic
2007 August 12, “Hotshots Older and Younger; Offstage Opera”, New York Times:
This dichotomy between gratification and withholding is emblematic of the piece’s problems. Mr. Hartke seems unsure whether he wants to be realistic, building up a mood through a slow accumulation of details (with the entire first act set in the stagecoach), or parodistic, spoofing his shallow characters and adding antic cartoon touches (bells as the sound of soupspoons against bowls).

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  1. partitas
2007 August 12, “Hotshots Older and Younger; Offstage Opera”, New York Times:
Christian Tetzlaff was just turning 27 when he recorded the Bach sonatas and partitas for Virgin Classics in 1993, and many marveled at the maturity and assurance of the playing.

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  1. pinscher
2007 August 12, Brendan I. Koerner, “Cages Without Corners”, New York Times:
As the loving owner of Petey, a miniature pinscher, Mr. Pracilio had long noticed that the dog seemed melancholy after spending time in a traditional rectangular crate.

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  1. pixelized
2007 August 12, Seth Schiesel, “Masters of the Arcade Caught in a Replay”, New York Times:
Some want no greater validation than their initials on a high-score list; others spend years pursuing records that might offer pixelized immortality.

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  1. podlike
2007 August 12, Dennis Lim, “Same Old Aliens, but New Neuroses”, New York Times:
Marti must contend with a remote stepmother, podlike to begin with, and has to destroy the vegetative incarnations of her father and brother.

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  1. polystylistic
2007 August 12, “The Week Ahead: Aug. 12-Aug. 18”, New York Times:
For most composers eclecticism means drawing on various contemporary styles, from Minimalism to Serialism to chance and improvisation, or mixing formal and pop styles, or even borrowing moves from composers of earlier eras. Mr. Golijov’s purview includes all that and World Music as well, and his polystylistic, culture-spanning “Pasión Según San Marcos” is his grand postmodern treatise on the subject.

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  1. psychosexually
2007 August 12, Dennis Lim, “Same Old Aliens, but New Neuroses”, New York Times:
Mr. Ferrara’s stylized, psychosexually charged film provides a hopeful ending but otherwise takes huge liberties with the Finney template.

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  1. ragtimey
2007 August 12, Jon Pareles, “Cheerful New Zealand Pop and Spooky Louisiana Rock”, New York Times:
It’s a tribute to the ragtimey gospel of the Rev. Gary Davis.

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  1. redecking
2007 August 12, Anthony Ramirez, “Road Worker Dies in a Fall From a Bridge in New Jersey”, New York Times:
The $270 million redecking project is set to end in 2009.

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  1. refi
2007 August 12, Floyd Norris, “In a Credit Crisis, Large Mortgages Grow Costly”, New York Times:
“It has shut down the refi market.”

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  1. reswear
2007 August 12, “For Want of a Swearing In, an Arrest Is Lost in Indiana”, New York Times:
“I don’t think it’s credible to state that the city should reswear officers who were already sworn in,” Mr. Wright said.

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  1. rivalrous
2007 August 12, Liesl Schillinger, “Children’s Books / Young Adult”, New York Times:
But as “Eclipse” begins, both Edward’s and Jake’s exotic lineages have been exposed, and the heat on their rivalrous courtship has been cranked up to “broil.”

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  1. rubouts
2007 August 12, Dwight Garner, “Inside the List”, New York Times:
A kind of bloody fairy tale about the Mafia which leaves the stage littered with rubouts.

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  1. sarcophagy
2007 August 12, Steven Erlanger, “A Museum to Get Lost In, and How Israel Is Fixing It”, New York Times:
Mr. Snyder, who took over as director in 1997, sees the project as the solution to deep irritation over how the Israel Museum’s rich and varied collections — from the earliest known fragment of biblical text on a tiny silver amulet (seventh century B.C.) and sarcophagy to Islamic jewelry, major Impressionists and photography — seem almost to be hidden in a maze of different entryways.

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  1. sexlessness
2007 August 12, Laurie Abraham, “Can This Marriage Be Saved?”, New York Times:
This was the fourth session of a yearlong couples-therapy group led by a Philadelphia psychologist named Judith Coché, and it had already been established that among Clem’s major reasons for being here was the sexlessness of his marriage (once a month at best, though the couple would disagree about the frequency in a perversely predictable way: Clem, who missed it most, believed he’d had it the least, and vice versa).

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  1. shiraz
2007 August 12, Somini Sengupta, “India’s Whiskey-Drinking Elite Make Room for Wine”, New York Times:
At the same time, stiff competition looms: Prompted by complaints filed by the European Union and United States at the World Trade Organization , India reduced tariffs on imported liquor in July, potentially making a shiraz from Coonawarra, Australia, for instance, as affordable as Mr. Grover’s offering from Gundamakere.

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  1. silents
2007 August 12, Woody Allen, “The Man Who Asked Hard Questions”, New York Times:
All kinds, silents and talkies.

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  1. sirenlike
2007 August 12, Dennis Lim, “Same Old Aliens, but New Neuroses”, New York Times:
The drones, when they notice a human in their midst, alert the others by unleashing a sirenlike banshee wail.

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  1. spellbindingly
2007 August 12, Woody Allen, “The Man Who Asked Hard Questions”, New York Times:
For example, when you grasp that both women in “The Silence” are really only two warring aspects of one woman, the otherwise enigmatic film opens up spellbindingly.

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  1. strongside
2007 August 12, The Associated Press, “A Victory Does Not Save Trent Green From Jeers”, New York Times:
After being hospitalized overnight, Holdman said he was eager to return to practice to fight for the strongside linebacker job, but he never made it back onto the field.

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  1. tercio *
2007 August 12, Martin Scorsese, “The Man Who Set Film Free”, New York Times:
I don’t remember, but I do remember the charge that ran through me the first time I heard that opening musical theme — ominous, staccato, plucked out on strings, so simple, so stark, like the horns that announce the next tercio during a bullfight.

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  1. turbos
2007 August 12, Ezra Dyer, “Volkswagen’s Wildest Bug”, New York Times:
If you own a VW Passat with the W8 motor, then you own half of a Veyron engine, minus the turbos.

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  1. undebatable
2007 August 12, Ezra Dyer, “Volkswagen’s Wildest Bug”, New York Times:
What is undebatable right now is that the select few who own (or lease) a Veyron hold the keys to the world’s greatest automotive thrill ride.

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  1. unfundable
2007 August 12, Michael Fitzgerald, “It Takes Deep Pockets to Fight Global Warming”, New York Times:
But he called it unfundable; it’s barely past the idea phase, and venture capitalists invest in projects that will be commercially viable in three to five years.

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  1. unmooring
2007 August 12, Christopher Hitchens, “The Boy Who Lived”, New York Times:
For Orwell, the English school story from Tom Brown to Kipling’s Stalky and Co. was intimately bound up with dreams of wealth and class and snobbery, yet Rowling has succeeded in unmooring it from these considerations and giving us a world of youthful democracy and diversity, in which the humble leading figure has a name that — though it was given to a Shakespearean martial hero and king — could as well belong to an English labor union official.

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  1. unparsed
2007 August 12, Conrad De Aenlle, “Rocking the Boat, but Why?”, New York Times:
Economic data may be best left unparsed these days, but other developments would provide early evidence of more widespread difficulties, Mr. Yardeni said.

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  1. unpointed
2007 August 12, The Associated Press, “‘The Next (Insert Name Here)’”, New York Times:
There are rarely any bobbled dance steps or unpointed toes when she steps on the floor.

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  1. unpriceable
2007 August 12, Ben Stein, “Chicken Little’s Brethren, on the Trading Floor”, New York Times:
News last Thursday that a small amount of unpriceable subprime mortgages was in a BNP Paribas fund in France sent the markets in Europe and the United States sharply lower.

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  1. vampiredom
2007 August 12, Liesl Schillinger, “Children’s Books / Young Adult”, New York Times:
Frozen at the age he was when vampiredom was thrust upon him (in the great influenza epidemic of 1918), Edward is now eternally a younger man, while Jake’s 16 and holding.

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  1. vanful
2007 August 12, Tom Shone, “Standard Deviations”, New York Times:
In “I’m Dick Felder!” a dentist decides one day to leave his wife and son and hitch a lift with a vanful of teenage runaways.

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  1. violinistic
2007 August 12, “Hotshots Older and Younger; Offstage Opera”, New York Times:
Young hotshot fiddlers today cut their violinistic teeth on Bach’s six unaccompanied works, and who can blame them?

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  1. wbf
2007 August 12, John Kifner, “Life With Zabar’s at the Epicenter”, New York Times:
There are a terrace overlooking the Hudson (Riv Vu!), heavily planted; a wbf; and a great, if teensy, kitchen.

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  1. werepups
2007 August 12, Liesl Schillinger, “Children’s Books / Young Adult”, New York Times:
Or will Bella choose Jake, and raise a litter of dark-haired werepups?

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Sequestered[edit]

  1. antibottled
2007 August 12, Alex Williams, “Water, Water Everywhere, but Guilt by the Bottleful”, New York Times:
She helped mount an antibottled water campaign at work, posting fliers trumpeting environmental reasons why people should drink tap water instead of the free Crystal Geyser her employer provides.

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  1. antidigestible
2007 August 12, William Safire, “Cleavage Umbrage”, New York Times:
Although baked-potato skins and antidigestible breakfast cereals are no longer called roughage (a word replaced by the fashionable fiber), we still have dotage , from the verb dote — “to lavish attention on, as to a grandchild” — now rescued from harshness toward senility by a pun, anecdotage .

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  1. squaroid
2007 August 12, Tom Shone, “Standard Deviations”, New York Times:
He’s simply a middle-aged squaroid who takes a walk on the wild side: he gets a Mohawk, takes drugs and sleeps with one of the girls, noting, “Things were almost exactly as he had expected.”

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  1. superlecherous
2007 August 12, Deborah Solomon, “Superdude”, New York Times:
I am not a superlecherous guy.

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