User:Visviva/NYT 20071007

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words, lacking English entries in the English Wiktionary as of the most recent database dump, found in the 2007-10-07 issue of the New York Times (2009-02-11).

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213345 tokens ‧ 156810 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 14238 types ‧ 121 (~ 0.85%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-10-07[edit]

  1. affinage
  2. antibacklash
    • 2007 October 7, Alex Williams, “Primitive? Moi?”, New York Times:
      Ricky Van Veen, a founder of the Web site CollegeHumor.com , argued that it was better that the skeptics fired their ammunition so soon: “The backlash and antibacklash cycles happen so fast now, it’s almost good to get the backlash early.
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  3. antitrend
  4. bagheads
  5. bagless
    • 2007 October 7, S.S. Fair, “Vacuum Packed”, New York Times:
      I darted from room to room as the see-through bagless dustbin piled high with shocking amounts of icky-poo.
      add
  6. boogeymen
    • 2007 October 7, Sophie Harrison, “Anxiety Attacks”, New York Times:
      But Nadas draws on older boogeymen, too.
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  7. bowlegged
    • 2007 October 7, Sabrina Tavernise, “In Life of Lies, Iraqis Conceal Work for U.S.”, New York Times:
      “Our life, it makes you laugh, but it’s a tragedy,” said Felah, a bowlegged Shiite man with a tired look, who has lost six close relatives, including a brother, to Sunni militants, and whose wife and children have been forbidden to see him by a bitterly sectarian father-in-law.
      add
  8. braciola *
    • 2007 October 7, Tom Perrotta, “The Squeamish American”, New York Times:
      I remember the wounded looks she used to give me as I slurped my industrial noodles and broth while everyone else at the table chowed down on baked ziti and braciola that tasted like the old country.
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  9. brotchen
    • 2007 October 7, Tom Perrotta, “The Squeamish American”, New York Times:
      Even the food seemed familiar; Frau H. kindly made sure I had peanut butter to spread on my brotchen every morning, and I ate a lot of sausage.
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  10. burcak
    • 2007 October 7, Joseph V. Tirella, “Welcome. But Don’t Call Them German.”, New York Times:
      Some people danced; others sampled the burcak, a fizzy sweet wine that is traditionally made in mid-September.
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  11. circularities
    • 2007 October 7, David Leavitt, “Secrets and Lies”, New York Times:
      This sort of rehearsal on Paula’s part recurs throughout the novel, which evokes perfectly the circularities of a sleepless night, as well as Paula’s maternal anxiety as she spins variations on the dangerous theme of how the twins are going to react.
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  12. clothbound
    • 2007 October 7, Charles Mcgrath, “A Shaper of the Canon Gets His Place in It”, New York Times:
      THE latest inclusion in the Library of America, that clothbound hall of literary fame, is two big volumes of Edmund Wilson’s critical writings.
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  13. confettiesque
    • 2007 October 7, Alex Kuczynski, “Paper Tiger”, New York Times:
      Later that week I received a Certificate of Destruction, a karmically satisfying document that stated that my items not only had been crosscut into a confettiesque vapor but would also be recycled.
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  14. corporatespeak
    • 2007 October 7, “Letters”, New York Times:
      The advertising slogans, once linguistically and culturally translated, lose none of the corporatespeak inanity that they convey in English.
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  15. countercoups
    • 2007 October 7, Simon Romero, “Living in Exile Isn’t What It Used to Be”, New York Times:
      The change in atmosphere is hitting Latin America with particular force, because the right of political asylum for former heads of state in the region was once viewed as sacred — a kind of institutional understanding that underlay the cycle of coups and countercoups, dictatorships and rebellions, periods of repression or totalitarianism interrupted by episodes of democracy.
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  16. counterestablishment
    • 2007 October 7, Jonathan Rauch, “Crisis on the Right”, New York Times:
      Founded in 1953 to seed a new conservative generation (and originally called the Intercollegiate Society of Individualists), this pioneer of what would become a sprawling conservative counterestablishment boasted as its first president a young man named William F. Buckley Jr. , who would go on to bigger things.
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  17. crossbreeding
    • 2007 October 7, Will Blythe, “American Male Opinionated Chatterbox”, New York Times:
      The old dividers — nation, race, religion — will be overpowered by crossbreeding and by our mass media, our world Culture o’ Enjoyment.”
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  18. cuica *
    • 2007 October 7, Jon Pareles, “From Brazil to Mexico to Pure Bob Dylan”, New York Times:
      Her voice enjoys a continual dialogue with the cuica, the Brazilian friction drum that regularly answers her with playful squeaks.
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  19. curbsides
    • 2007 October 7, Cara Buckley, “Bohemia by the Bay”, New York Times:
      His collection of found objects retrieved from various curbsides includes a 1940s-era metal fan, a large rocking horse and a Rollfast bicycle.
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  20. curtainmeister
    • 2007 October 7, Jane Withers, “Dream Weavers”, New York Times:
      Mies, on the other hand, was a tyrannical curtainmeister: in some of his Lake Shore Drive apartments, in Chicago, residents are still obliged to use a gray, white or silver material to shade their floor-to-ceiling windows.
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  21. cyberpsychology
    • 2007 October 7, Daniel Goleman, “E-Mail Is Easy to Write (and to Misread)”, New York Times:
      These quirks of cyberpsychology are familiar to Clay Shirky, an adjunct professor in New York University ’s interactive telecommunications program.
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  22. doomy
    • 2007 October 7, Simon Reynolds, “Music to Brood by, Desolate and Stark”, New York Times:
      Joy Division helped spawn the Goth movement (countless sepulchral singers have copied Mr. Curtis’s doomy baritone drone), and you can spot its stray chromosomes popping up everywhere from emo to the more melancholy strains of metal.
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  23. droog *
    • 2007 October 7, S.S. Fair, “Vacuum Packed”, New York Times:
      I further discovered that vacuum cleaners can infuriate: I caught an iRobot Roomba doing its thing without human supervision at a friend’s place and shamefully descended into a “Clockwork Orange” droog mood, kicking the Roomba and flinging fistfuls of Altoids at its vacant face.
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  24. experimentalism
    • 2007 October 7, Simon Reynolds, “Music to Brood by, Desolate and Stark”, New York Times:
      Most recently, Joy Division-indebted outfits like Interpol, Bloc Party and Editors have refocused attention on post-punk, that late 1970s, early ’80s era of musical experimentalism and lyrical innovation in which Joy Division assumed a central role.
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  25. flailings
    • 2007 October 7, Dennis Lim, “The Cult of the Lads From Manchester”, New York Times:
      He had to enact the grand mal seizures that plagued him as well as the manic, uncoordinated flailings that were his signature dance moves.
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  26. fritillaries
    • 2007 October 7, Guy Trebay, “In Paris, a Fevered Pursuit of ‘It’”, New York Times:
      As loopy phenomena go, hardly anything compares to Paris during Fashion Week and certainly never more so than now, when the fritillaries of fashion are forced to share the cobbled streets outside the Louvre with the genial lager louts in town for the World Cup of Rugby.
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  27. frontotemporal
  28. grippy
    • 2007 October 7, Lawrence Ulrich, “Same Carriage, Fresh Horses”, New York Times:
      Piloting the 5 Series feels so natural that you barely notice turning the grippy, well-designed steering wheel; it’s more like flexing muscles in your palms and fingers, and the BMW anticipates where you’re headed.
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  29. guaiac
    • 2007 October 7, Chandler Burr, “Wood Wins”, New York Times:
      So he focused on wood: dark-smelling guaiac, aromatic balsam, resin absolute and Moroccan cedar from the Atlas mountains, all of them natural.
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  30. gullwing
    • 2007 October 7, Jim Norman, “At Least the Cars Sit Still”, New York Times:
      The sporty red Italian car with open gullwing doors is presented head-on from a low angle, with a featureless azure sky behind it.
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  31. hazan
    • 2007 October 7, Jon Meacham, “A Nation of Christians Is Not a Christian Nation”, New York Times:
      When George Washington was inaugurated in New York in April 1789, Gershom Seixas, the hazan of Shearith Israel, was listed among the city’s clergymen (there were 14 in New York at the time) — a sign of acceptance and respect.
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  32. hexenyl
    • 2007 October 7, Chandler Burr, “Wood Wins”, New York Times:
      He mated it to a tart Granny Smith apple (the synthetics cis-3 Hexenol, Liffarome and cis-3 hexenyl acetate) and added Delta Muscenone (the smell of human skin).
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  33. hiplessness
    • 2007 October 7, Cara Buckley, “Bohemia by the Bay”, New York Times:
      It remains the forgotten borough; even the success of the hip-hop group Wu-Tang Clan did not remove the island’s seemingly impenetrable veneer of hiplessness.
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  34. hobbyless
    • 2007 October 7, Alex Hawgood, “Contributors”, New York Times:
      And although Trachtenberg claims to be hobbyless, he is certainly busy.
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  35. huppah
    • 2007 October 7, Eric V. Copage, “Amy Edelman and Phil Leo”, New York Times:
      Ms. Edelman and Mr. Leo were married on Sept. 23 in front of 160 guests in an outdoor ceremony at the Crossed Keys Inn in Andover, N.J. Bonnie Cushing, an interfaith minister, officiated under a colorful huppah that was decorated with memories that included Ms. Edelman’s first words to Mr. Leo after their elevator encounter: “Well, at least you’re a good kisser.”
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  36. hyperrational
    • 2007 October 7, Stephen Kotkin, “The Boy Behind the Global Theories”, New York Times:
      The force of her radically pro-competition, hyperrational worldview changed his life and made for a lifelong friendship.
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  37. hyphenator
    • 2007 October 7, Charles Mcgrath, “Death-Knell. Or Death Knell.”, New York Times:
      The greatest hyphenator ever was Shakespeare (or Shak-speare in some contemporary spellings) because he was so busy adding new words, many of them compounds, to English: “sea-change,” “leap-frog,” “bare-faced,” “fancy-free.”
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  38. idealisms
    • 2007 October 7, Jonathan Rauch, “Crisis on the Right”, New York Times:
      Conservatism can keep us out of trouble by warning against the fanciful idealisms of the left (communism), the right (fascism) and the ultrareligious (bin Ladenism), but it cannot scratch humanity’s perpetual itch for a Promised Land free of hunger, pain, conflict and grubby politics.
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  39. inna *
    • 2007 October 7, William Safire, “Suspension of Disbelief”, New York Times:
      (Jimmy Durante : “Ev’rybody wants ta get inna de act.”)
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  40. insiderish
    • 2007 October 7, Liesl Schillinger, “Books of Style”, New York Times:
      Tongue-in-cheek and piquantly insiderish, it paints a funhouse portrait of Steven P. Jobs, the multibillionaire eminence of Apple, supposedly in his own words. Mr. Lyons’s parody presents a man given to vertiginous mood swings, ruthless managerial decisions and hippie-ish hankerings for smoothies.
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  41. intraracial
    • 2007 October 7, Frank Rich, “Nobody Knows the Lynchings He’s Seen”, New York Times:
      Thus he asserted to a compliant Jan Crawford Greenburg of ABC News last week that everyone except him tiptoes around talk of intraracial crime and out-of-wedlock births.
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  42. intrateam
    • 2007 October 7, Mark Hulbert, “At Some Funds, a Gender Communication Gap”, New York Times:
      As a result, the fund may realize few if any of diversity’s benefits, while still suffering from the inefficiencies often caused by intrateam strife.
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  43. jackalope
    • 2007 October 7, Dan Levin, “Dial D for Drinks”, New York Times:
      “That’s a jackalope, it’s a mythical creature,” ventured her neighbor, eager to start up conversation.
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  44. juniorest
    • 2007 October 7, Bill Scheft, “See Kinky Run”, New York Times:
      At the end of the 1972 film “The Candidate,” the too young, too blond, too cute, too idealistic Bill McKay has upset the incumbent, Crocker Jarmon, to become the newest, juniorest senator from California.
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  45. kerflooey
    • 2007 October 7, Alex Kuczynski, “Paper Tiger”, New York Times:
      Shredders, however, do not last, so after two more versions went kerflooey, I moved on to Code Shred, a company that for a relatively small fee (in my case, $65) will come to your house and perform what it calls a “purge.”
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  46. kilims
    • 2007 October 7, “Letters to the Editor”, New York Times:
      Its walls are decorated with a collection of antique fabrics, including an 18th-century wall hanging in the dining area, and the floors are covered with Turkish rugs and kilims.
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  47. kolace
    • 2007 October 7, Joseph V. Tirella, “Welcome. But Don’t Call Them German.”, New York Times:
      But her friend Klara Lunacko, who was sipping from a cup of burcak and nibbling kolace, a confection of fried dough, cheese, prunes and ground poppy seeds, sounded a more philosophical note.
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  48. labdanum
    • 2007 October 7, Chandler Burr, “Wood Wins”, New York Times:
      He shellacked them with smoky labdanum, oakmoss and incense black as pitch.
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  49. manifestologue
    • 2007 October 7, Bill Scheft, “See Kinky Run”, New York Times:
      Midway through this manifestologue, Friedman tucks in some populist platform, not all of it as cheeky as a solution to the immigration problem called “The Five Mexican Generals Plan,” or “invading Oklahoma so we can move up to No. 48 in affordability of health care.”
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  50. megacomplex
  51. midtempo
    • 2007 October 7, Jon Pareles, “From Brazil to Mexico to Pure Bob Dylan”, New York Times:
      Modestly strummed guitars, chugging midtempo piano chords and low-fi drums carry songs that embrace both old-fashioned romance and modern self-consciousness.
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  52. minicourse
    • 2007 October 7, Phil Patton, “Cars With Street Cred. (Students Dreamed Them Up.)”, New York Times:
      In his minicourse, Mr. Thompson passed along designer guidelines like the three-wheel rule: for a car’s proportions to look right, the space between the front and rear wheels should be roughly three wheel widths.
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  53. mockbuster
    • 2007 October 7, Rolf Potts, “The New B Movie”, New York Times:
      Whereas the Asylum had a well-defined audience as a horror-movie company, the mockbuster strategy aims at a broader and shallower demographic: some viewers have seen the real blockbuster and want more of the same thing, no matter how lo-fi; some are genre geeks, interested in low-budget adventure and sci-fi films; others rent the movie thinking it is something else (Web sites are rife with the scornful entries of duped film fans).
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  54. mockbusters
    • 2007 October 7, Rolf Potts, “The New B Movie”, New York Times:
      He told me that the Asylum discovered mockbusters by accident, in 2005, when Latt’s own adaptation of H. G. Wells’s “War of the Worlds” hit video stores around the time Steven Spielberg ’s big-screen version hit cinemas.
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  55. multibillionaire
    • 2007 October 7, Liesl Schillinger, “Books of Style”, New York Times:
      Tongue-in-cheek and piquantly insiderish, it paints a funhouse portrait of Steven P. Jobs, the multibillionaire eminence of Apple, supposedly in his own words. Mr. Lyons’s parody presents a man given to vertiginous mood swings, ruthless managerial decisions and hippie-ish hankerings for smoothies.
      add
  56. multipoint
    • 2007 October 7, Ted West, “A Place to Keep All Those Old Toys”, New York Times:
      Membership includes unlimited access to the clubhouse; one multipoint check of the car before you leave for a drive; four quick checks of fluid levels, tire pressures, dust and glass cleaning; three hours of use of the detail bay, and one valet service where your vehicle can be delivered to your home, then picked up and returned to the garage when you’re done.
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  57. mythomaniacal
    • 2007 October 7, Dennis Lim, “The Cult of the Lads From Manchester”, New York Times:
      Tony Wilson, the mythomaniacal founder of Factory, a producer of “Control” and the subject of Michael Winterbottom ’s “24 Hour Party People” (which touches on the Joy Division story), died in August.
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  58. neoconitis
  59. newsmaking
    • 2007 October 7, Stephen Kotkin, “The Boy Behind the Global Theories”, New York Times:
      Mr. Greenspan’s newsmaking accusation that the Bush-Cheney White House and the Republican Congress betrayed their principles cuts close to the bone — his bone.
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  60. noncolor
    • 2007 October 7, Liesl Schillinger, “Books of Style”, New York Times:
      Fake Steve Jobs is a perfectionist who is as insistent that his chai latte be served at 165 degrees as that his iMacs, iPods and iPhones be exactly the right noncolor.
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  61. oakmoss
    • 2007 October 7, Chandler Burr, “Wood Wins”, New York Times:
      He shellacked them with smoky labdanum, oakmoss and incense black as pitch.
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  62. oddsmakers
  63. outgained
    • 2007 October 7, Andrew Das, “Chargers Are Already Losing Their Grip”, New York Times:
      New England, which plays the Browns today, has outgained its opponents by more than 200 yards a game and outscored them by an average of 25 points.
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  64. overaugmented
    • 2007 October 7, Joyce Cohen, “A New Role in the West Village”, New York Times:
      “We had to augment with linen and stuff like that, and we overaugmented because there was a mistake in things coming from England.
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  65. overmedication
    • 2007 October 7, Dennis Lim, “The Cult of the Lads From Manchester”, New York Times:
      The story homes in on Mr. Curtis’s personal pain: his struggles with epilepsy, overmedication and a guilt-inducing love triangle.
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  66. overtop
    • 2007 October 7, Holly Brubach, “Crib Notes”, New York Times:
      With few exceptions (among them, Jefferson’s chair with candlesticks ingeniously attached to the end of the armrests and his chaise longue with a desk fitted overtop), the items on display are not so remarkable as to warrant being fetishized, and the reader begins to suspect that maybe that’s the message: that Great Men’s doorknobs or teacups or banisters are not inherently superior to — or even appreciably different from — those of Ordinary Men.
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  67. parklike
    • 2007 October 7, Peter Applebome, “A Job for Spider-Man, or a Former Boy Scout”, New York Times:
      But it does mean that what began as the most quixotic of efforts — a plan to turn an abandoned railroad bridge into a parklike path across the Hudson — might actually be close to gaining critical mass, if not quite the critical mass its original visionary had in mind.
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  68. pedimented
    • 2007 October 7, Christopher Gray, “The New Church Lives Up to Its Name”, New York Times:
      It has seemed likely that it matched the surviving left-hand side, with pilasters and pedimented windows.
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  69. petrostates
    • 2007 October 7, Daniel Kurtz-Phelan, “The King of Venezuela”, New York Times:
      Venezuela’s combination of extensive oil resources and widespread poverty — a combination sadly common in petrostates — has long offered an opening for a people’s “avenger.”
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  70. phenylethyl
    • 2007 October 7, Chandler Burr, “Wood Wins”, New York Times:
      To lift them off the skin, he plugged in dimethyl sulfide (a molecule found in truffles), beta ionone (which is apricoty), lactones and phenylethyl alcohol.
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  71. porkmeister
    • 2007 October 7, “The Mystery of the Coconut Interchange”, New York Times:
      Errors can happen, but this turnabout is especially suspicious since it involves a malodorous piece of road pork originally sought by Representative Don Young, the fabled House porkmeister.
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  72. porkpies
    • 2007 October 7, Dan Levin, “Dial D for Drinks”, New York Times:
      Two men in porkpies kept a close surveillance over a trio of newly seated blondes huddled over the drink menu.
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  73. postconcert
  74. prerational
    • 2007 October 7, “Can I Put You on Hold?”, New York Times:
      It is hard to escape the impression that if retailers could they would find some way to hook up directly to the prerational brain — the part of us that knows nothing about common sense, budgets, late fees and interest rates — a part of the brain to which, for many of us, our cellphones have constant access.
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  75. preshift
    • 2007 October 7, Dan Barry, “Politicians, and a Town in Flux, Come Calling”, New York Times:
      The factory workers in Plant 2 would stop at Uncle Nancy’s for preshift pick-me-ups, and the executives at Maytag headquarters down the street would come for lunch.
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  76. punchless
    • 2007 October 7, Tyler Kepner, “Must-Win Games Aren’t New to Yankees”, New York Times:
      Yesterday, after two punchless losses in buggy Cleveland, Torre canceled the team workout at Yankee Stadium.
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  77. rainlike
    • 2007 October 7, Monica Khemsurov, “Cloud Nine”, New York Times:
      A massive entertainment complex veiled by a puff of condensation that would hover nearly 1,000 feet in the air atop rainlike stilts, “it’s a dream in which everyone can participate, the antithesis to Dubai’s exclusive towers,” says the Lebanese designer Nadim Karam of Atelier Hapsitus.
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  78. reputationally
    • 2007 October 7, Andrew Ross Sorkin, “The Money Game and the Mind Game at Sallie Mae”, New York Times:
      Wherever the parties stand, at the end of the day, the person with the swing vote is Mr. Flowers, who has the most riding on the deal — financially and reputationally.
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  79. sanserification
    • 2007 October 7, Charles Mcgrath, “Death-Knell. Or Death Knell.”, New York Times:
      Cummings wrote back in the age of real type, but looked forward to what might be called the sanserification of print: the way our computer versions of type are dropping all the little vestiges of metal fonts — the serifs, or pleasing little curves and points jutting out from a letter in traditional fonts, and, for that matter, the hyphen, the comma, the quotation mark.
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  80. semimystical
    • 2007 October 7, Robert Sullivan, “This Is Not a Bob Dylan Movie”, New York Times:
      When I stepped from the wings to look through the camera itself, I saw, in one semimystical, semirevealing moment, the artist as one with the artist he was trying to artificially reassemble.
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  81. semirevealing
    • 2007 October 7, Robert Sullivan, “This Is Not a Bob Dylan Movie”, New York Times:
      When I stepped from the wings to look through the camera itself, I saw, in one semimystical, semirevealing moment, the artist as one with the artist he was trying to artificially reassemble.
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  82. sensoriality
    • 2007 October 7, “Out of the Fire”, New York Times:
      The element that ties all of my work together is something I call sensoriality: everything that’s related to the senses.
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  83. shabbout
    • 2007 October 7, Dexter Filkins, “Regrets Only?”, New York Times:
      The guests, brought here to discuss plans for the American University of Iraq, had been passing around platters of shabbout, an oily and bony fish, in the dining room of a villa owned by Iraq’s president, Jalal Talabani, when the question came up.
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  84. shreddables
    • 2007 October 7, Alex Kuczynski, “Paper Tiger”, New York Times:
      Code Shred delivered a container to my doorstep; I filled it with shreddables.
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  85. sniffable
    • 2007 October 7, Chandler Burr, “Wood Wins”, New York Times:
      (0) Do not inhale; (*) Inoffensive; (**) Eminently sniffable; (***) Breathtaking; (****) Total nose job; (*****) Transcendent
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  86. snoozy
    • 2007 October 7, Lawrence Ulrich, “Same Carriage, Fresh Horses”, New York Times:
      While the basic automatic-transmission 528xi takes a snoozy 7.6 seconds to reach 60 miles an hour, the 535xi blazes there in 5.6 seconds, a remarkable two-second advantage.
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  87. sootlike
  88. spalike
  89. spatiality
    • 2007 October 7, Simon Reynolds, “Music to Brood by, Desolate and Stark”, New York Times:
      But its studio music was stark and desolate, permeated with a cavernous spatiality courtesy of the brilliantly inventive producer Martin Hannett.
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  90. spycam
    • 2007 October 7, Liesl Schillinger, “Books of Style”, New York Times:
      Mr. Lyons’s portrait is hilarious and eerily specific; you get the feeling he planted a spycam in one of Mr. Jobs’s mock turtles.
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  91. squadronmate
  92. superspeedway
    • 2007 October 7, Ray Glier, “Talladega Nightmares for the Chase”, New York Times:
      Talladega is a bigger wild card in the 2007 Chase because the UAW-Ford 500 will be the first superspeedway race for the Car of Tomorrow, Nascar’s attempt to level the playing field by giving drivers a vehicle with the same basic body.
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  93. superweapons
    • 2007 October 7, Dexter Filkins, “Regrets Only?”, New York Times:
      Not for oil, Makiya argued, and not for some superweapons hidden in the sand, but to satisfy an obligation to our fellow human beings.
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  94. swagged
    • 2007 October 7, Douglas Brenner, “Marxism”, New York Times:
      Here’s just a small sampling: a Byzantine-domed stone synagogue; a mansard-roofed brick chateau; a flat-topped International-style villa of concrete and glass; an end table with a crackled lacquer finish reminiscent of Song dynasty porcelain; brushed-nickel andirons as austere as Cycladic figurines; a black patent-leather side chair chic enough for Audrey Hepburn to perch on; a stairway runner of clipped fur; faux swagged curtains cast in plaster; a Picasso nude hung above a fossil-stone mantel.
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  95. symbolist
    • 2007 October 7, Robert Sullivan, “This Is Not a Bob Dylan Movie”, New York Times:
      But back to the image of Todd Haynes, back to the long day, a rainy day, in a cold dark building, and into the bright blast of white light, where Haynes stepped toward the final Dylan to be filmed, the one dressed like Arthur Rimbaud, the Dylan that Haynes named Arthur, a teenage French symbolist poet, played by Ben Whishaw.
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  96. taillamps
    • 2007 October 7, Lawrence Ulrich, “Same Carriage, Fresh Horses”, New York Times:
      For the 2008 model year, all 5 Series cars get a barely discernable makeover for the front fascia, headlamps and taillamps.
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  97. templelike
    • 2007 October 7, Douglas Brenner, “Marxism”, New York Times:
      The templelike New Orleans Museum of Art was, he said, “inspired by the Greek but sufficiently modified to give a subtropical appearance.”
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  98. trackside
    • 2007 October 7, The Associated Press, “The Dogs Are Running, but Who’s Watching?”, New York Times:
      The Van Heuvels, brothers who have retired, sat at a prime table in the trackside pavilion near the betting windows, but they could have settled down about anywhere.
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  99. trioval
    • 2007 October 7, Ray Glier, “Talladega Nightmares for the Chase”, New York Times:
      It is a 2.66-mile trioval with long stretches of speed-building asphalt, which have been made less threatening by restrictor plates that cut the horsepower of the powerful stock car engines.
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  100. tryless
    • 2007 October 7, The Associated Press, “England Upends Australia”, New York Times:
      It was a record fourth time England had posted a tryless victory in a World Cup game.
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  101. ultrareligious
    • 2007 October 7, Jonathan Rauch, “Crisis on the Right”, New York Times:
      Conservatism can keep us out of trouble by warning against the fanciful idealisms of the left (communism), the right (fascism) and the ultrareligious (bin Ladenism), but it cannot scratch humanity’s perpetual itch for a Promised Land free of hunger, pain, conflict and grubby politics.
      add
  102. unbeautiful
    • 2007 October 7, Anne Midgette, “A No-Frills Label Sings to the Rafters”, New York Times:
      WHEN Naxos started issuing recordings in the late 1980s, the releases seemed to trumpet their budget-label status with a no-frills design: the CDs, with their chunky type, white ground and small picture at the bottom, are distinctly unbeautiful.
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  103. uncasual
    • 2007 October 7, David Leavitt, “Secrets and Lies”, New York Times:
      He’ll say it in an odd, uncasual way, and you’ll think twice about answering back.”
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  104. unflowery
    • 2007 October 7, Simon Reynolds, “Music to Brood by, Desolate and Stark”, New York Times:
      And his lyrics boasted an unusual combination of unflowery directness and mysterious poetic depths: “A cry for help, a hint of anesthesia/The sound from broken homes” (from “Colony”). Mr. Curtis’s despair has a perennial appeal to sensitive teenagers confronting for the first time the possibility that life is meaningless.
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  105. unfunniness
    • 2007 October 7, Bill Scheft, “See Kinky Run”, New York Times:
      In a state that offers festival seating on death row, there is only one capital offense for the Favorite Son Humor Writer: first-degree unfunniness.
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  106. untransformed
    • 2007 October 7, Tom Perrotta, “The Squeamish American”, New York Times:
      I went to the famous museums and walked down the legendary streets, but I remained stubbornly untransformed.
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  107. washings
    • 2007 October 7, Alix Browne, “Dream On”, New York Times:
      A queen-size set starts at $5,800 but is good for 200 washings — averaging out to a mere $4 a night.
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  108. waterslide
    • 2007 October 7, Will Blythe, “American Male Opinionated Chatterbox”, New York Times:
      At an amusement park reminiscent of a setting from his fiction, Saunders watches “the Glowering Muttering Arabs” and 15 members of the United States Navy go down a waterslide in quick succession.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. architectual = architectural
    • 2007 October 7, “Joy de Menil and Laird Reed”, New York Times:
      His mother is an architectual historian and an antiques appraiser; she is also the secretary of the board of the Decorative Arts Trust in Philadelphia.
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