User:Visviva/NYT 20071019

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words, lacking English entries in the English Wiktionary as of the most recent database dump, found in the 2007-10-19 issue of the New York Times (2009-02-26).

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99315 tokens ‧ 72916 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 9144 types ‧ 37 (~ 0.405%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-10-19[edit]

  1. aquamanile
    • 2007 October 19, Karen Rosenberg, “Sacred Works in Secular Places”, New York Times:
      Among the medieval treasures at Blumka are a lion aquamanile, a vessel used by priests for ceremonial hand washing, with a magnificent tufted tail.
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  2. bigleaf
    • 2007 October 19, Austin Considine, “Fall Color Without the Crowds”, New York Times:
      At Vancouver , Wash., across the Columbia from Portland, pick up Highway 14 and wind your way east along the river through cottonwoods, gold-colored bigleaf and fiery-red vine maples, groves of lichen-covered red alders, and a smattering of ash, wild cherry and white oak.
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  3. billboarding
    • 2007 October 19, “Bundlers in ’08”, New York Times:
      Major candidates, meanwhile, show no shame, billboarding their sugar daddies by dubbing them honored Pioneers, Hillraisers and the like in setting $100,000-plus table stakes to play in the inner sanctum.
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  4. chrismatory
    • 2007 October 19, Karen Rosenberg, “Sacred Works in Secular Places”, New York Times:
      Like the pleurant an Anglo-Saxon chrismatory (a container for items used in the sacraments) from the eighth or ninth century is a wonder of survival and craftsmanship.
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  5. depthless
    • 2007 October 19, Holland Cotter, “King-Size Stories, Woven for the Ages”, New York Times:
      The result is not an image of the natural world in a tapestry but a depiction of nature as a tapestry: a splendid, impenetrable, depthless screen of shivering pixels.
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  6. goldenrods
    • 2007 October 19, Austin Considine, “Fall Color Without the Crowds”, New York Times:
      With “the purple asters and yellow goldenrods in bloom, Ms. Hall said, “you get a real profusion of different colors.”
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  7. historicizing
    • 2007 October 19, Roberta Smith, “Sensualist With a Cause in Old Vienna”, New York Times:
      The breaking point came in 1900 with the hostile reaction to his “Philosophy,” a public commission for the University of Vienna in which Klimt’s historicizing realism began to turn toward a darker, more distorted Symbolist treatment of figures and space.
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  8. hyperqualified
    • 2007 October 19, Adam Nossiter, “An Improbable Favorite Emerges in Cajun Country”, New York Times:
      For months, the congressman has cultivated the rural areas where he lost in 2003, “witnessing” in remote Pentecostal churches, neutralizing his image of being hyperqualified — head of the state health department at 24, head of the university system at 28 and under secretary for the Department of Health and Human Services at 30 under President Bush — that did not help him the last time.
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  9. kawaigari
    • 2007 October 19, Norimitsu Onishi, “Japan Wrings Its Hands Over Sumo’s Latest Woes”, New York Times:
      In a practice called kawaigari, older wrestlers repeatedly throw a novice down on the ring, ostensibly to toughen him up but also to mete out punishment.
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  10. kengai
    • 2007 October 19, Paula Deitz, “In Autumn, a Garden Lover’s Thoughts Turn to Kiku”, New York Times:
      And kengai (cascade) are the smaller, more densely clustered chrysanthemums in brilliant reds, yellows, pinks and whites tied and trained across wire frames of varying lengths to appear like waterfalls.
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  11. kiku *
  12. minisode
  13. minisodes
  14. momiji
    • 2007 October 19, Paula Deitz, “In Autumn, a Garden Lover’s Thoughts Turn to Kiku”, New York Times:
      In one garden, the autumnal reds mimic maple forests, or momiji, cascading down a cliff face, and the other, pure white, symbolic of Mount Hakuba in the Japanese Alps, forecasts the snows of winter.
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  15. multichambered
    • 2007 October 19, Karen Rosenberg, “Sacred Works in Secular Places”, New York Times:
      Together the two exhibitions present a multichambered curiosity cabinet of sacred objects in a secular context.
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  16. multisided
  17. multisymptom
    • 2007 October 19, Gardiner Harris, “Ban Complex Drugs for Children, Official Says”, New York Times:
      SILVER SPRING, Md., Oct. 18 — A federal drug safety official told a panel of experts Thursday that they should consider a ban on multisymptom over-the-counter pediatric cough and cold medicines for children under 6.
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  18. nonarchitectural
    • 2007 October 19, Holland Cotter, “King-Size Stories, Woven for the Ages”, New York Times:
      The 44 tapestries that Thomas P. Campbell, a Met curator, has shipped into town for the occasion are some of the largest nonarchitectural objects in the museum.
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  19. pleurant *
    • 2007 October 19, Karen Rosenberg, “Sacred Works in Secular Places”, New York Times:
      Touch is the best way to appreciate the Romanesque sculpture of a crouching lion, with a grooved mane that cascades over his paws, or the smooth marble gown of a pleurant (a weeping woman) from the tomb of Aymon le Pacifique, the Count of Savoy.
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  20. pleurants
    • 2007 October 19, Karen Rosenberg, “Sacred Works in Secular Places”, New York Times:
      Thought to be the work of the master sculptor Jean de Brecquessent, she is one of only a few of the 14 pleurants to have survived the tomb’s destruction during the French Revolution.
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  21. plotzed
  22. pointful
    • 2007 October 19, Alastair Macaulay, “A Ballet Company Debuts”, New York Times:
      Still, on this program he seldom looks any more innovative than Mr. Forsythe does in the pointful neo-classicism of his “Slingerland Pas de Deux,” a New York premiere.
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  23. prefeminist
  24. promotable
    • 2007 October 19, Richard Sandomir, “New Job for Patrick, the Former ESPN Star”, New York Times:
      Although Sports Illustrated’s properties are dwarfed by the breadth of ESPN’s, signing Patrick gives the magazine a promotable and popular personality.
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  25. simvastatin
    • 2007 October 19, Alex Berenson, “Weak Sales Prompt Pfizer to Cancel Diabetes Drug”, New York Times:
      Sales of another drug, Lipitor , a cholesterol -lowering medicine that is Pfizer’s most important product, plunged 13 percent in the United States, as more patients were switched to generic simvastatin, a much cheaper competitor.
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  26. structureless
    • 2007 October 19, William Grimes, “The Dictator as a Young Poet-Thug”, New York Times:
      The killer really was an intellectual, and certainly no bureaucrat. Mr. Montefiore notes, shrewdly, that “everything with Stalin was political, but he worked in an eccentric, structureless, unbureaucratic, almost bohemian style that would not have succeeded in any other government, then or now.” Mr. Montefiore successfully captures “the sheer weird singularity of the man” and the lethal instincts that propelled him to the summit of power.
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  27. superrealism
    • 2007 October 19, The New York Times, “Art in Review”, New York Times:
      Rendered by the German sculptor Martin Honert with Duane Hanson-like superrealism, they have heavy, bearded features, and they wear custom-made, clunky shoes; dungarees; and hooded sweatshirts.
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  28. unbureaucratic
    • 2007 October 19, William Grimes, “The Dictator as a Young Poet-Thug”, New York Times:
      The killer really was an intellectual, and certainly no bureaucrat. Mr. Montefiore notes, shrewdly, that “everything with Stalin was political, but he worked in an eccentric, structureless, unbureaucratic, almost bohemian style that would not have succeeded in any other government, then or now.” Mr. Montefiore successfully captures “the sheer weird singularity of the man” and the lethal instincts that propelled him to the summit of power.
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  29. underplantings
    • 2007 October 19, Paula Deitz, “In Autumn, a Garden Lover’s Thoughts Turn to Kiku”, New York Times:
      The outdoor setting around the lily ponds in the twin courtyards of the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory is opulent with maples in radiant hues, and a veritable forest of conifers and bamboo with underplantings like bush-clover, silver grass and balloon flowers from the “seven flowers of autumn” cited in early Japanese poems.
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  30. uwaya
    • 2007 October 19, Paula Deitz, “In Autumn, a Garden Lover’s Thoughts Turn to Kiku”, New York Times:
      Swagged in silky purple with red tassels, open pavilions called uwaya serve as stage sets for three styles of chrysanthemums, the theatrical centerpieces of the exhibition.
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  31. vulturelike
    • 2007 October 19, The New York Times, “Art in Review”, New York Times:
      A bronze sculpture titled “Annunciation” at Zwirner treads similarly provocative ground: It shows a nude woman, her skin buffed to gold, copulating with a vulturelike black angel.
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  32. wonkishness
    • 2007 October 19, Adam Nossiter, “An Improbable Favorite Emerges in Cajun Country”, New York Times:
      This time, Mr. Jindal is aiming his multipoint plans at ethical reform in state government, schools and economic development, and attacks on his wonkishness have fallen flat.
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Sequestered[edit]