User:Visviva/NYT 20071230

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-12-30 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-26).

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175937 tokens ‧ 128480 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 13153 types ‧ 84 (~ 0.639%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-12-30[edit]

  1. abrazo *
    • 2007 December 30, George Vecsey, “Postcards From 2007 Amid Visits to Scandal”, New York Times:
      FOXBOROUGH, MASS., JAN. 7 Bill Belichick and Eric Mangini share a brief postgame abrazo after the Patriots playoff victory.
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  2. adjustability
    • 2007 December 30, Don Sherman, “Features Out of Sight, but Top of Mind”, New York Times:
      HEIGHT-ADJUSTABLE CHILD SEAT To assure the safety of a familys most precious cargo, Volvo introduced the first integrated child seat with two stages of adjustability.
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  3. amour *
    • 2007 December 30, Pamela Paul, “Why Is That Land Smiling?”, New York Times:
      The object of my amour is not a woman or even a person.
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  4. antibourgeois
    • 2007 December 30, Lee Siegel, “The Blush of the New”, New York Times:
      Ferociously antibourgeois, Flaubert lived alone, unconsoled and unencumbered by marriage or family.
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  5. archmodernist
    • 2007 December 30, Lee Siegel, “The Blush of the New”, New York Times:
      Thomas Mann was an archmodernist, and this was his favorite story: One day, Gustave Flaubert was out walking with his sister.
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  6. ballade
    • 2007 December 30, Anthony Tommasini, “A Patience to Listen, Alive and Well”, New York Times:
      Even a 10-minute Chopin ballade for piano, let alone Messiaens 75-minute Turangalila Symphony, tries to grapple with, activate and organize a relatively substantial span of time.
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  7. bannered
    • 2007 December 30, Gail Collins, “The Last of Her Kind”, New York Times:
      She spent her waning days on the job somewhat messily, creating a sensation when she claimed that her office was being bugged and saying such nice things about the rogue Republican and independent presidential candidate John Anderson that a Chicago paper bannered that she had endorsed him.
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  8. bloomings
  9. boatlike
    • 2007 December 30, Ken Johnson, “A Happy Accident, Carefully Planned”, New York Times:
      A boy and a girl snuggle in the front seat of a boatlike convertible as a powerful, smoke-belching locomotive charges by on a raised track just beyond the field of parked cars.
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  10. caucusers
  11. celebrityhood
    • 2007 December 30, Betty Fussel, “Food Edenist”, New York Times:
      For the first time ever, foodies achieved the celebrityhood of rock stars and movie stars.
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  12. charmlessly
    • 2007 December 30, Lawrence Ulrich, “Tot Tested, Dad Approved”, New York Times:
      The new xB is pricier, bloated, charmlessly ugly and gets 15 percent lower mileage.
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  13. clubland
    • 2007 December 30, Manohla Dargis, “Hot Properties”, New York Times:
      Her paparazzi moments are as orchestrated as her red-carpet and clubland appearances, and coordinated for the same instrumental reasons: to get as many images of her out there as possible.
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  14. coddlers
    • 2007 December 30, “Immigration and the Candidates”, New York Times:
      Instead of answering these questions, the Republican candidates have spent their time blasting one another as coddlers of illegal immigrants and supporters of amnesty.
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  15. counterculturalists
    • 2007 December 30, Betty Fussel, “Food Edenist”, New York Times:
      The Hesses were an odd pair of counterculturalists.
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  16. cowboying
    • 2007 December 30, Felicity Barringer, “Surge in Off-Roading Stirs Dust and Debate in West”, New York Times:
      Forty years ago when I was out cowboying I never saw a soul, said Heidi Redd, who operates the Dugout Ranch near Canyonlands National Park in southeastern Utah.
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  17. delineator
    • 2007 December 30, Daphne Merkin, “A Neurotics Neurotic”, New York Times:
      Wheelis, an urbane delineator of the human psyche, in 1975.
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  18. democratizations
    • 2007 December 30, Lee Siegel, “The Blush of the New”, New York Times:
      Think of the scraps of newspapers and advertisements in the collages of Picasso and Braque; of the parodic newspaper headlines and the music hall ditties in Joyces Ulysses; of Leopold Bloom wiping himself with a newspaper in the notorious book that appalled Virginia Woolf (and delighted T. S. Eliot); or of the Dadaists total collapse of serious art into the quotidian, or Mahlers quotations of nursery rhymes or Stravinskys saxophones the list of the modernists elitist democratizations is interminable.
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  19. descargas *
    • 2007 December 30, Nate Chinen, “New Sounds, Somewhere Beyond In Rainbows”, New York Times:
      The great Cuban bassist Israel Lpez, known as Cachao, made a number of casually arresting recordings in Havana in the late 1950s and early 60s, a rich documentation of a tradition of late-night jam sessions, or descargas.
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  20. drawler
  21. forefronters
  22. hatefest
    • 2007 December 30, Lynn Zinser, “Rangers Get Most From Maple Leafs Mistakes”, New York Times:
      Early on, the main concern of Maple Leafs fans was booing Avery, who started this hatefest the last time the Rangers played here when he nearly sparked a brawl by antagonizing Darcy Tucker in warm-ups.
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  23. hoity
    • 2007 December 30, Pamela Paul, “Why Is That Land Smiling?”, New York Times:
      Rather than projecting a hoity NPR-ness (Weiner was one of its foreign correspondents for a decade), he cops an attitude of faux populism, taking potshots at the Ivy League , Nietzsche and other dead white males, all of which comes across as somewhat insincere.
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  24. hypermasculine
    • 2007 December 30, Rob Hoerburger, “A Perfect Match”, New York Times:
      Reilly, meanwhile, was both strapping and doughy, in one sense the embodiment of the pre-AIDS sissy stereotype, with his ascots, hairpieces, shirts opened to the third button and tidy penmanship, and also a prophetic send-up of the post-AIDS hypermasculine gay man, especially when he lowered his voice and became Chuck, the pipe-smoking alter-ego.
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  25. icemaking
    • 2007 December 30, The Associated Press, “Even in Buffalo, Making Ice Can Be Challenge”, New York Times:
      Considering the equipment the N.H.L. icemaking specialist Dan Craig brought with him this week dozens of rolls of plastic pipe, near-endless gallons of coolant and two 400-ton refrigeration units it appears more difficult than one would expect.
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  26. inconquerable
    • 2007 December 30, Jim Rasenberger, “The World of Tomorrow”, New York Times:
      We may have aeroplanes winging the once inconquerable air.
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  27. ironizing
    • 2007 December 30, Lee Siegel, “The Blush of the New”, New York Times:
      His novels mocked and maligned the French middle class, ironizing it into oblivion.
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  28. kiddos
    • 2007 December 30, Dominique Browning, “The Kitchen Gods Life”, New York Times:
      Theyve become media rooms where Mom, Dad and kiddos No. 1 and No. 2 plug into their iPods, Xboxes, Macs and movies in companionably self-absorbed isolation.
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  29. matric
  30. matrics
    • 2007 December 30, Michael Wines, “One Test and 600,000 Destinies in South Africa”, New York Times:
      It is possible to exaggerate, of course: Some who fail the matrics go on to full and lucrative careers, and laggards can try to boost a low score by taking a second test later.
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  31. megamusical
    • 2007 December 30, Charles Isherwood, “Plays Well With Others”, New York Times:
      This year the lone major musical to open, Young Frankenstein, landed with a splat and proved how tricky it is to fine-tune the work of a stage full of talent in the context of a machine-tooled megamusical.
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  32. merblades
  33. mersisters
    • 2007 December 30, Matthew Gurewitsch, “Learning to Move Under the Sea, on Wheels”, New York Times:
      Recreating that Eureka! moment in Disneyland, 12-year-old Cody Hanford, as Flounder, whizzed in from the sidelines to join the multiracial, multicultural sextet of Ariels mersisters in the sassy number Shes in Love.
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  34. meurette
    • 2007 December 30, “For 2008s First Meal”, New York Times:
      The menu includes pancakes with warm maple syrup; quiche with mixed greens; eggs en meurette with bacon, onions mushrooms and red wine; and a large selection of omelets.
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  35. midtour
    • 2007 December 30, Mark Costello, “The Spy in the Gray Flannel Suit”, New York Times:
      He ranks men by their pay grades and is utterly impressed when a high-achieving colleague pulls down a performance award and a midtour promotion to GS-11.
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  36. miscomprehensions
    • 2007 December 30, Lee Siegel, “The Blush of the New”, New York Times:
      But unlike Henry Moores giant sculptures, in which negative space plays a positive role, Gays omissions and miscomprehensions cry out to be filled in and corrected.
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  37. missilelike
    • 2007 December 30, Ken Johnson, “A Happy Accident, Carefully Planned”, New York Times:
      Frozen on the distant movie screen is an airplane that points, missilelike, toward the passing train.
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  38. nannying
    • 2007 December 30, Peter S. Goodman, “The Free Market: A False Idol After All?”, New York Times:
      The new regulatory tilt threatens to tie up innovation in a straitjacket of bureaucratic nannying while slowing the global economy, they say.
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  39. nondepressed
    • 2007 December 30, Lauren Slater, “The Anthropological Psychologist”, New York Times:
      Mothers who were angry in their melancholy were more likely to rear rejection-sensitive children than were nondepressed mothers.
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  40. nondoorman
    • 2007 December 30, Joyce Cohen, “The Waiting Game”, New York Times:
      If it was a nondoorman building, you think, Where is all that money going? she said.
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  41. nonmetropolitan
    • 2007 December 30, Perry Garfinkel, “Drawn to an Island Life, and Seeing the Cost in Every Price Tag”, New York Times:
      More people are moving to what demographers call amenity areas: nonmetropolitan regions with large percentages of seasonal housing, high expenditures for recreational activities and hotels, and a significant concentration of natural amenities like shoreline.
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  42. nonrelative
    • 2007 December 30, Randy Cohen, “Seminal Revelation”, New York Times:
      It warned him about the possibility of a nonrelative trying to scam a putative parent, a scheme it has encountered before.
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  43. nonshareholder
    • 2007 December 30, Jay Romano, “Co-ops Get a Break on Revenue Rules”, New York Times:
      This law means that virtually every co-op with commercial income will no longer be at risk of losing shareholders tax deductions if the co-op has excessive nonshareholder income, he said. Mr. Saft said the rule was adopted in 1942 as part of an effort to give shareholders in co-ops the same tax treatment as homeowners.
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  44. nonslave
  45. oneworld
    • 2007 December 30, Michelle Higgins, “Traveling the Globe on a Single Ticket”, New York Times:
      In the past year alone, oneworld has expanded its network by almost 100 destinations to nearly 700, served by more than 9,000 flights a day.
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  46. outreporting
    • 2007 December 30, Maggie Jones, “She Was Supposed to Be Dead”, New York Times:
      For the next three decades, she wrote for wire services from Cambodia, Sri Lanka, Afghanistan, Indonesia, Korea, Hong Kong, the Philippines and India, living outside the usual expat neighborhoods, learning the languages, outreporting many of her younger colleagues and using her own modest income to supplement the salaries of in-country wire-service staff.
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  47. outrush
    • 2007 December 30, Thayer Evans, “Paterno Has Last Laugh Against Texas A&M”, New York Times:
      Before a pro-Aggies crowd in a game played 170 miles from Texas A&Ms campus, Penn State running back Rodney Kinlaw rushed for a game-high 143 yards to help the Nittany Lions outrush the Aggies 270 yards to 154.
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  48. overstyled
    • 2007 December 30, James G. Cobb, “Giant Rises, and Shines”, New York Times:
      CHRYSLER SEBRING Other midsize cars have become so good, including the once-awful Koreans, that it only makes this line of mediocre yet overstyled cars seem even worse by comparison.
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  49. pantoum
    • 2007 December 30, “Poetry Chronicle”, New York Times:
      He adapts other traditional poetic modes and forms for the big screen theres a Natalie Wood ballad and a Bette Davis pantoum.
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  50. postcast
  51. postcasting
    • 2007 December 30, Peter L. Bernstein, “To Botch a Forecast, Rely on Past Experience”, New York Times:
      In looking back, I can now see the source of my error: I was postcasting extrapolating past experience instead of seeking change in future experience.
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  52. poundings
    • 2007 December 30, Mike Ogle, “Have Team, Will Travel, Losing Badly”, New York Times:
      After a season of predictable poundings, he will come home with about $650,000 for Presbyterians coffers.
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  53. prefeminist
    • 2007 December 30, Anthony Giardina, “Mr. Reassurance”, New York Times:
      These were plays in which a smart, wacky dame sets her heart on a guy, and after three acts of prefeminist self-abasement, finally wins him.
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  54. prestorm
  55. segregationism
    • 2007 December 30, David D. Kirkpatrick, “Shake, Rattle and Roil the Grand Ol Coalition”, New York Times:
      Mr. Rollins, for his part, traced Mr. Huckabees political lineage back to George Wallace in 1968 (without the segregationism). Mr. Wallace and, later, Pat Buchanan and Ross Perot appealed to the same blocs of working-class voters and socially conservative white Southerners that the Republican Party began trying to court in Senator Barry Goldwaters 1964 campaign.
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  56. sinuousness
    • 2007 December 30, Daphne Merkin, “A Neurotics Neurotic”, New York Times:
      Allen Wheelis stands out in this fallow field for the elegiac sinuousness of his prose, his tonic grimness (Life is unmanageable, escapes reason) and his willingness to drop the therapists cloaked persona for a literary one that is more authentic and less elevated.
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  57. smileage
  58. soupily
    • 2007 December 30, Dwight Garner, “Inside the List”, New York Times:
      B would be given the camera, while A would go behind the signing table to put an arm round me or a hand on my shoulder as I signed the book with a flourish while looking up into the lens grinning soupily.
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  59. steelmaking
    • 2007 December 30, “Paperback Row”, New York Times:
      These 17 interlocking stories take place over a period of 40 years among Polish-American families in the fictional coal-mining and steelmaking town of Cokesville, Pa. In this first collection, Monk uses deadpan humor to counter the characters hopelessness.
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  60. subinvestment
  61. subverter
    • 2007 December 30, Lee Siegel, “The Blush of the New”, New York Times:
      For example, Gay knows that the image of the modernist as committed subverter of custom and convention is hackneyed.
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  62. superluxury
    • 2007 December 30, Christopher Gray, “Mr. Murdoch Builds His Dream House”, New York Times:
      Soon they graduated to superluxury buildings, like the all-limestone 960 Fifth Avenue, at 77th Street, completed in 1928.
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  63. superrational
    • 2007 December 30, Jeremy Mccarter, “One-Hit Wonder”, New York Times:
      But the central paradox of Arthurs life, as Lycett puts it, is that this trained doctor and inventor of the superrational Sherlock Holmes somehow fell completely in thrall to spiritualism.
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  64. thunderingly
    • 2007 December 30, Pamela Paul, “Why Is That Land Smiling?”, New York Times:
      Fascinating nuggets of information are too often wedged between thunderingly obvious generalizations; pithiness occasionally veers into the trite: The disease and the cure, reads a typical, less-than-illuminating passage.
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  65. truckish
    • 2007 December 30, James G. Cobb, “Giant Rises, and Shines”, New York Times:
      WE may look back on 2007 as the year public opinion shifted toward greener cars and trucks, a result of heightened concern about climate change and oil imports, coupled with high gas prices and a shift away from truckish S.U.V.s. Interestingly, though, this wasnt a year when a lot of notable green cars came to market.
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  66. uncomplicatedness
    • 2007 December 30, Anthony Giardina, “Mr. Reassurance”, New York Times:
      D uring the war years of the 40s, the uncomplicatedness of certain actors made them useful.
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  67. unconsoled
    • 2007 December 30, Lee Siegel, “The Blush of the New”, New York Times:
      Ferociously antibourgeois, Flaubert lived alone, unconsoled and unencumbered by marriage or family.
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  68. undersung
    • 2007 December 30, Charles Isherwood, “Plays Well With Others”, New York Times:
      But plays dont perform themselves, and the most inspiring story of the season may be the return to the center spotlight of that undersung asset, the actor.
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  69. unfulfillment
    • 2007 December 30, Daphne Merkin, “A Neurotics Neurotic”, New York Times:
      His last book, The Way We Are a spare inquiry into his preoccupying theme of how to live with unfulfillment lurking on one side and death beckoning on the other was published more than a month after he died.
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  70. ungranted
    • 2007 December 30, Gretchen Morgenson, “The Debt Crisis, Where Its Least Expected”, New York Times:
      Before the Wish Fund reached its settlement, its mortgage-related losses meant that nine childrens wishes would go ungranted.
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  71. unscarred
    • 2007 December 30, Dave Anderson, “Breaching the Field of Play, Sports Tumbled Out of Bounds”, New York Times:
      Golf committed to a drug testing program but remained unscarred as Tiger Woods , with a record-tying 63 in the second round, took the PGA Championship, his 13th major title, and seven other PGA Tour events.
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  72. villagelike
    • 2007 December 30, Jennifer Bleyer, “Another Little Italy, With Scant Parking to Match”, New York Times:
      Morris Parks roughly 25,000 residents are so concerned with maintaining the visual character and villagelike atmosphere of their neighborhood that they supported a zoning change several years ago to restrict the size and density of new residential development.
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  73. weepily
    • 2007 December 30, Dave Itzkoff, “A One-Way Ticket to Disaster”, New York Times:
      While the incident introduced characters like Larry Birkhead, the dapper baby-daddy of Ms. Smiths daughter, Dannielynn, and Judge Larry Seidlin, who weepily presided over a hearing for custody of Ms. Smiths body, it also revealed the degree to which television, magazines and newspapers were taking cues from their nimbler online competitors.
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  74. worldy
    • 2007 December 30, Tom Shone, “The Big Sleepover”, New York Times:
      Already on her second marriage when she met Chandler, she was worldy, sexually wise and 18 years his senior, a fact he apparently didnt know until after they were married.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. prolifigacy
    • 2007 December 30, Daphne Merkin, “A Neurotics Neurotic”, New York Times:
      Despite his prolifigacy, he rarely wrote for analytic journals; one of the few exceptions was a paper published in The International Journal of Psychoanalysis in the mid-50s titled, tellingly enough, The Vocational Hazards of Psychoanalysis.
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