User:Visviva/NYT 20080330

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
← Previous (2008-03-29) Words harvested from the New York Times, 2008-03-30
  • List status: open
→ Next (2008-03-31)

This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words, lacking English entries in the English Wiktionary as of the most recent database dump, found in the 2008-03-30 issue of the New York Times (2009-03-03).

[ see all NYT pages ] - [ see all tracking lists ]

178877 tokens ‧ 130837 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 13208 types ‧ 82 (~ 0.621%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2008-03-30[edit]

  1. antifighting
    • 2008 March 30, Jeff Z. Klein And Lew Serviss, “Happy Birthday to Mr. Hockey as Howe Turns 80”, New York Times:
      In a news conference Friday, the Quebec minister of leisure and sport, Michelle Courchesne, asked the league’s commissioner, Gilles Courteau, to submit a report to the government and install new antifighting rules in time for next season.
      add
  2. antisprawl
    • 2008 March 30, Antoinette Martin, “Why Dumps Are Gaining in Allure”, New York Times:
      “There is a definite regulatory preference in New Jersey for brownfield and urban infill sites,” said Mr. Manewitz, noting that antisprawl, pro-environmental restrictions put in place over the last decade have ruled out any type of construction in some spots, and strongly discouraged it in others.
      add
  3. belowstairs
    • 2008 March 30, Sophie Fels, “Nanny of Camelot”, New York Times:
      Life belowstairs is a case for character and color and heart over affluence and power.
      add
  4. bioprogram
    • 2008 March 30, Michael Erard, “Walking the Talk”, New York Times:
      Bickerton swats down all these theories and explains how he arrived at his own solution, the language bioprogram hypothesis, which he elaborated in the book “Roots of Language” (1981).
      add
  5. bootjacks
    • 2008 March 30, Virginia Heffernan, “Lost and Found”, New York Times:
      Like ashtrays and bootjacks and bud vases, bird cages are some of the dead-letter items from the heyday of manufacturing that people were given too many times, or bought, and bought again, and never thought of throwing away.
      add
  6. bracketlike
    • 2008 March 30, Benjamin Wallace-Wells, “A Case of the Blues”, New York Times:
      For the past decade, the politics of the country has been defined by this map — a conservative heartland and two bracketlike liberal coasts.
      add
  7. businesswide
    • 2008 March 30, Christi M. Pedra; As Told To Claudia H. Deutsch, “Multitasking, Then and Now”, New York Times:
      But then I got lucky: Northern Telecom hired me to train people in using complex businesswide phone systems.
      add
  8. buzzworthy
    • 2008 March 30, Leslie Kaufman, “Channeling Carrie”, New York Times:
      She frequents sleek and buzzworthy bars with her girlfriends.
      add
  9. closetful
    • 2008 March 30, Patty Dann, “How We Got From Grief to Pancakes”, New York Times:
      I had been spooked at the time, never imagining that at age 46 I would have a closetful of my dead husband’s clothes, and that it would seem right.
      add
  10. creepfests
    • 2008 March 30, Virginia Heffernan, “Lost and Found”, New York Times:
      (And that’s not even the creepiest part of these two creepfests.)
      add
  11. declutterers
    • 2008 March 30, Virginia Heffernan, “Lost and Found”, New York Times:
      But alongside the collectors, who are no doubt greening the world, the ideology of the equally high-minded declutterers is still going strong.
      add
  12. demises
    • 2008 March 30, Richard Sandomir, “You Can’t Just Blow Up History”, New York Times:
      The percussive, rapid-fire demises of Three Rivers Stadium, Cinergy Field (originally Riverfront Stadium), the Kingdome and Veterans Stadium are viewable on YouTube.
      add
  13. disenthrall
    • 2008 March 30, Peter Applebome, “Applying Gandhi’s Ideas to Climate Change”, New York Times:
      He noted Gandhi’s sense of satyagraha and a statement of Lincoln’s during the depths of the Civil War: “We must disenthrall ourselves, and then we shall save our country.”
      add
  14. dormered
  15. everydude
    • 2008 March 30, Dave Itzkoff, “Tackling Directing and George Clooney”, New York Times:
      But for John Krasinski, the actor who plays Jim, the affable everydude of “The Office,” the news wasn’t all bad.
      add
  16. expandability
    • 2008 March 30, Ezra Dyer, “Cars So Hip That It Hurts”, New York Times:
      The Pioneer head unit for the stereo looks kind of old school in this age of the artfully integrated automotive media system, but it allows for plenty of expandability through extra amps and subwoofers, and it sounds fine for a car at this price.
      add
  17. floriculture
    • 2008 March 30, Elsa Dixler, “Paperback Row”, New York Times:
      Three-quarters of American customers’ flowers are imported, mostly from Latin America, Stewart points out in her investigation of the $40 billion global business of floriculture.
      add
  18. gallerina
    • 2008 March 30, Jan Hoffman, “Gatekeepers to the Art World”, New York Times:
      The term gallerina was popularized last summer in Danielle Ganek’s tart gallery novel, “Lulu Meets God and Doubts Him,” in which the heroine toils for a pompous dealer.
      add
  19. greenway
    • 2008 March 30, Michael Pollak, “Circle Line, on Foot”, New York Times:
      Along the Harlem River, a waterfront park and greenway is being built, but parking lots for construction trucks bar public access at certain points, Mr. Norvell said in an e-mail message.
      add
  20. guajira *
    • 2008 March 30, Nate Chinen, “The Sounds of Senegal, Atlanta and Two Alto Saxophones”, New York Times:
      The beguiling guitar work of Barthélemy Attisso would be enough to recommend the album, were it not for a breezily amalgamated babble of grooves (high life, rumba, calypso, guajira) and dialects (Wolof, Malinké, Portuguese Creole).
      add
  21. hardanga
    • 2008 March 30, Lisa Fugard, “Mama Goodie”, New York Times:
      The stitch called hardanga, Goodison tells us, disappeared in 1832 with the execution of the Jamaican freedom fighter Sam Sharpe.
      add
  22. hayfields
    • 2008 March 30, Bridget Stutchbury, “Did Your Shopping List Kill a Songbird?”, New York Times:
      In mating season, the male in his handsome tuxedo-like suit sings deliriously as he whirrs madly over the hayfields.
      add
  23. horning
    • 2008 March 30, Emma Brockes, “Climb Every Mountain”, New York Times:
      After giving the matter a great deal of thought, she turned down her biological father’s offer to get to know him and was offended when, during the height of her fame in “My Fair Lady,” he turned up at an after-party: “I didn’t like his attitude, and certainly didn’t like him horning in on something that should have been my dad’s province.”
      add
  24. hyperarticulate
    • 2008 March 30, Ilan Greenberg, “Changing the Rules of the Games”, New York Times:
      Savitt, a peripatetic, hyperarticulate 40-year-old human rights activist, is the mind behind a long string of organizations conducting campaigns to pressure China to change its policies by threatening to tarnish this summer’s Olympic Games.
      add
  25. hypercapitalism
    • 2008 March 30, “Letters”, New York Times:
      Perhaps Americans will finally choose to stop living in an economic Wild West and at last reject the boom-and-bust cycle of turbocharged hypercapitalism in favor of a more humane, livable society.
      add
  26. inextricability
    • 2008 March 30, Joseph O’Neill, “The Informer”, New York Times:
      It’s an ambitious premise that’s almost intolerably weighty; but with guile and wonderful imaginative sympathy, Park stays afloat on the most treacherous of thematic currents: the inhumanity of violence, the vulnerability of the individual before history, truth’s inextricability from power, the elusive nature of redemption.
      add
  27. jpegs
    • 2008 March 30, Jan Hoffman, “Gatekeepers to the Art World”, New York Times:
      She really is so very busy — e-mailing jpegs of artwork to collectors, writing news releases, updating a gallery’s inventory or simply ordering lunch for the staff.
      add
  28. kingbirds
    • 2008 March 30, Bridget Stutchbury, “Did Your Shopping List Kill a Songbird?”, New York Times:
      Migratory songbirds like bobolinks, barn swallows and Eastern kingbirds are suffering mysterious population declines, and pesticides may well be to blame.
      add
  29. leggily
    • 2008 March 30, Leslie Kaufman, “Channeling Carrie”, New York Times:
      MAYBE, just maybe, if Carrie Bradshaw, the dynamo at the center of the phenomenally successful television series “Sex and the City,” were still in her 20s and just starting her ascent into New York life in 2008, maybe, just maybe, she would be like Julia Allison, who this evening is sitting leggily astride a leather ottoman in Houston’s, a bar in the Flatiron District.
      add
  30. medievals
    • 2008 March 30, Pamela Paul, “Sexual Advances”, New York Times:
      Intended as much for amusement as for enlightenment, “Bonk” is Roach’s foray into the world of sex research, mostly from Alfred Kinsey onward, but occasionally harking back to the ancient Greeks and medievals (equally unenlightened).
      add
  31. methamidophos
    • 2008 March 30, Bridget Stutchbury, “Did Your Shopping List Kill a Songbird?”, New York Times:
      Rice farmers in the region use monocrotophos, methamidophos and carbofuran, all agricultural chemicals that are rated Class I toxins by the World Health Organization, are highly toxic to birds, and are either restricted or banned in the United States.
      add
  32. microprojector
    • 2008 March 30, Anne Eisenberg, “Coming Soon, to Any Flat Surface Near You”, New York Times:
      Iljin DSP’s microprojector, which will be marketed and distributed by SK Telecom, a large wireless operator in South Korea, projects images of 7 to 60 inches, depending on a room’s lighting; the device’s light source is a combination of lasers and L.E.D.’s. The lithium ion battery lasts about two hours, Dr. Bae said.
      add
  33. microprojectors
    • 2008 March 30, Anne Eisenberg, “Coming Soon, to Any Flat Surface Near You”, New York Times:
      The microprojectors, still in prototype, use light-emitting diodes, lasers or a combination of the two to cast a display of up to 50 or 60 inches, or perhaps even wider, in darkened spaces and 7 to 20 inches or so when there is ambient light.
      add
  34. misvoting
    • 2008 March 30, Frank Rich, “Hillary’s St. Patrick’s Day Massacre”, New York Times:
      Perhaps she thought that by taking the huge gamble of misspeaking one more time about her narrow escape on the tarmac at Tuzla, she could compensate for misvoting on Iraq.
      add
  35. monocrotophos
    • 2008 March 30, Bridget Stutchbury, “Did Your Shopping List Kill a Songbird?”, New York Times:
      In the mid-1990s, American biologists used satellite tracking to follow Swainson’s hawks to their wintering grounds in Argentina, where thousands of them were found dead from monocrotophos poisoning.
      add
  36. multicivilizational
    • 2008 March 30, Raymond Bonner, “Guess Who’s Coming to Power”, New York Times:
      Now, a young, well-traveled, multilingual foreign-policy scholar, Parag Khanna, suggests in “The Second World” that we are on the cusp of a new new world order — “a multipolar and multicivilizational world of three distinct superpowers competing on a planet of shrinking resources.”
      add
  37. nondoorman
    • 2008 March 30, Leslie Kaufman, “Channeling Carrie”, New York Times:
      According to the Real Estate Board of New York , the average rental for a one-bedroom apartment in a nondoorman building on the Upper East Side has jumped to $2,448 this year from $1,542 in 1998.
      add
  38. noni *
    • 2008 March 30, Richard Morgan, “A Shot of Goji, Please”, New York Times:
      Juices are fresh-squeezed and liquors are infused with so-called “superfoods” like noni (a Polynesian berry), kombucha (a fermented tea) and goji (Tibetan berries).
      add
  39. outland
    • 2008 March 30, Susann Cokal, “She, Robot”, New York Times:
      When a field trip leads them into an outland of nuclear radiation, ravaged forests and castoffs with damaged souls and bodies, both will be forced to reinvent themselves.
      add
  40. overprivileged
    • 2008 March 30, “Kimberly Peirce: No Iraq Blockbuster”, New York Times:
      Perhaps this is because, although they may well recognize that the Iraq war is a disastrous misadventure, audiences nonetheless seek out movies chiefly to be entertained rather than to be lectured and propagandized by a collection of Hollywood film industry types whom they perceive as smug, self-righteous, overprivileged and somewhat decadent, and whose lives bear scant resemblance to their own.
      add
  41. oversalted
    • 2008 March 30, Sophie Fels, “Nanny of Camelot”, New York Times:
      Laurie Graham’s 12th book, following “Gone With the Windsors,” sends a salt-of-the-earth Irish nanny (perhaps slightly oversalted) through 30 years in the Joe and Rose Kennedy household.
      add
  42. overscale
    • 2008 March 30, Suzanne Slesin, “Taking in the River View From Both Banks”, New York Times:
      He also designed the limestone master bathrooms outfitted with teak cabinets, as well as the refreshingly brisk all-white second baths, which have overscale subway-tile walls and white Waterworks geometric sinks.
      add
  43. panoramically
    • 2008 March 30, “Editors’ Choice”, New York Times:
      The clashes panoramically depicted here ultimately boil down to divergent attitudes toward religion, and the account’s central target is Islam.
      add
  44. pennette
    • 2008 March 30, Robert Trachtenberg, “Just Grate”, New York Times:
      A call to da Fiore in Venice yielded a pennette with sea scallops, broccoli florets and grated Parmigiano-Reggiano.
      add
  45. peperonata *
    • 2008 March 30, Hilary Howard, “Eos Airlines Lightens Its Menu”, New York Times:
      After an initial cocktail and towel service, canapés like feta zucchini rolls, grilled artichokes with peperonata, and prawns with cucumber will be served.
      add
  46. preferreds
    • 2008 March 30, Gretchen Morgenson, “If You Can’t Sell, Good Luck”, New York Times:
      Naturally, closed-end funds’ common shareholders love the juice that auction-rate preferreds provide.
      add
  47. protostate
    • 2008 March 30, Michael J. Totten, “Between West and East”, New York Times:
      She traces the arc of rising Shiite political power as it developed from Iran’s Islamic Republic and Saddam Hussein ’s defeat in Iraq to the emergence of Hezbollah’s protostate in south Lebanon.
      add
  48. protractedly
    • 2008 March 30, Terrence Rafferty, “The Bold and the Bad and the Bumpy Nights”, New York Times:
      Her breakthrough role, after three years of more or less routine assignments, came in John Cromwell’s 1934 adaptation of the W. Somerset Maugham novel “Of Human Bondage,” in which she plays the coldhearted Cockney temptress Mildred Rogers, a vile specimen who cruelly — and protractedly — abuses the affections of a sensitive, artistic, clubfooted young medical student.
      add
  49. psychohistorian
    • 2008 March 30, Tara Mckelvey, “Nonfiction Chronicle”, New York Times:
      Svoboda asks the Harvard psychohistorian Robert Jay Lifton .
      add
  50. redeveloper
    • 2008 March 30, Antoinette Martin, “Why Dumps Are Gaining in Allure”, New York Times:
      In Dover, Woodmont Properties is the designated redeveloper for the entire 75-acre former landfill site, not just the 10-acre hotel property, called Hilton Homewood Suites.
      add
  51. refinisher
    • 2008 March 30, Jay Romano, “Tubs and Showers Made New Again”, New York Times:
      One source for finding a local refinisher is the Bathtub Refinishing Referral Network in Medford, Ore., at refinishingonline.com .
      add
  52. refinishers
    • 2008 March 30, Jay Romano, “Tubs and Showers Made New Again”, New York Times:
      In addition to referring customers to local refinishers, Mr. Rountree’s company also sells refinishing products to do-it-yourselfers.
      add
  53. runga
    • 2008 March 30, Josh Weil, “Out of Africa, the Wisdom of a Warrior”, New York Times:
      There is something about entering a place with fluorescent flames rising from the “BBQ” sign that kills the concept of “chaperon” like a runga to the head.
      add
  54. satyagraha
    • 2008 March 30, Peter Applebome, “Applying Gandhi’s Ideas to Climate Change”, New York Times:
      He noted Gandhi’s sense of satyagraha and a statement of Lincoln’s during the depths of the Civil War: “We must disenthrall ourselves, and then we shall save our country.”
      add
  55. seminaked
    • 2008 March 30, Leslie Kaufman, “Channeling Carrie”, New York Times:
      Soon afterward, her ex appeared, seminaked, on the blog of a woman they both knew.
      add
  56. sinkmanship
    • 2008 March 30, William Safire, “Kitchen Sink”, New York Times:
      The latest round of sinkmanship began late last year among Republican candidates, as a Huckabee aide complained that the Romney camp was throwing “everything but the kitchen sink” at the new man from Hope.
      add
  57. sniggeringly
    • 2008 March 30, Jan Hoffman, “Gatekeepers to the Art World”, New York Times:
      On Saturdays, they are barraged by people dashing in from the street looking for restrooms; who, when denied access, can turn nasty (“Do I have to spend $2 million on a painting just so I can use your bathroom?”); and sniggeringly pose that war horse of rhetorical questions: who buys this stuff?
      add
  58. superyacht
    • 2008 March 30, Elizabeth Olson, “A Google Friend Is Now Facebook’s”, New York Times:
      SAIL AWAY Tom Perkins , the Silicon Valley venture capitalist, is putting his superyacht, the Maltese Falcon, up for sale, just two years after he first set sail on it.
      add
  59. taxidermied
    • 2008 March 30, “Show Stopper”, New York Times:
      Animal friends : I have various taxidermied animals.
      add
  60. toeshoes
    • 2008 March 30, Patty Dann, “How We Got From Grief to Pancakes”, New York Times:
      I brought her pink ribbons for toeshoes as a gift, to see if she remembers, the color perhaps, a sensual memory from long ago, twirling and smiling in the sunlight.
      add
  61. unbiddable
    • 2008 March 30, Benjamin Black, “The Lemur”, New York Times:
      She stood back and regarded him with tight-lipped, mild reproach, like a mother gazing upon an unbiddable, scalawag son.
      add
  62. unbloglike
    • 2008 March 30, Allen Salkin, “Why Blog? Reason No. 92: Book Deal”, New York Times:
      Mr. Andersen said what impressed him about White People’s prospects as a book is that it was already sort of unbloglike.
      add
  63. uncrafted
    • 2008 March 30, David Orr, “In Memoriam”, New York Times:
      The closer a poet is to the subject he elegizes, the more we expect him to respond in ways that aren’t “poetic” — but it takes craft to make a poem seem uncrafted, and it takes words to show how short our words can fall.
      add
  64. unjudging
    • 2008 March 30, Liesl Schillinger, “Eyes Wide Open”, New York Times:
      As each tale proceeds, unhurried, unjudging, the car slows, the turn signal makes its reassuring clicks, and the car glides without resistance into the drive, delivering you, consoled yet strangely disquieted, to the place you came from — a place you thought you’d left behind.
      add
  65. unlovelier
    • 2008 March 30, Terrence Rafferty, “The Bold and the Bad and the Bumpy Nights”, New York Times:
      Usually they kept looking, even when she was putting on display, as she frequently did, the unlovelier aspects of human nature.
      add
  66. unscrolled
    • 2008 March 30, The New York Times, “Zimbabweans Vote, Desperate for Change”, New York Times:
      HARARE, Zimbabwe — Lines were long at the polling stations here well before morning had unscrolled its first light.
      add
  67. unsoppy
    • 2008 March 30, Emma Brockes, “Climb Every Mountain”, New York Times:
      It opens with a soppy poem she wrote about England, but what follows is a decisively unsoppy account of a typically dismal English childhood, complete with cramped lodgings and brutish relatives, which Andrews tells briskly and without self-pity.
      add
  68. upsizing
    • 2008 March 30, Joyce Cohen, “More Than a Pet Project”, New York Times:
      They paid $850 a month for their studio, and assumed that upsizing would cost them around $2,000.
      add
  69. vizsla
    • 2008 March 30, Dan Shaw, “A Perfect Place for Man and Beast”, New York Times:
      It was a different story when he came to New York after graduating from the College of Veterinary Medicine at Ohio State , making the move with a neurotic vizsla named Margot.
      add
  70. wenge
    • 2008 March 30, Suzanne Slesin, “Taking in the River View From Both Banks”, New York Times:
      Mr. Faraday rattled off the options: Atlantic Luxe (white Carrara marble, African wenge floors, white Pedini cabinets); Harbor Chic (silver cabinets, white-oak flooring and “Portuguese limestone,” Mr. Faraday whispered, running his hand over the counter surface); and Hudson Mod (“the most traditional, with eggshell quartz counters, exotic wood cabinets and American chestnut flooring.”)
      add
  71. woodshop
    • 2008 March 30, Tyler Kepner, “Deep Inside the Big Ballyard in the Bronx”, New York Times:
      Bodo works from a woodshop on the side of the tunnel linking the clubhouse to the batting cage, which is known to some as the Columbus Room — as in hit well or be shipped back to Columbus, the Yankees’ former farm team.
      add

Sequestered[edit]

  1. woh *