User:Visviva/NYT 20080622

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
← Previous (2008-06-21) Words harvested from the New York Times, 2008-06-22
  • List status: open
→ Next (2008-06-23)

This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2008-06-22 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-13).

[ see all NYT pages ] - [ see all tracking lists ]

165545 tokens ‧ 119966 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 12498 types ‧ 54 (~ 0.432%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2008-06-22[edit]

  1. anthemion
    • 2008 June 22, Christopher Gray, “Brooklyn’s Stately Esplanade”, New York Times:
      Mr. Moore ran copper cresting in the form of anthemion leaves around the top of a bay window on the side of the house, and he put low, curved eyebrow dormers on either side of the third-floor gable.
      add
  2. balafon
    • 2008 June 22, Colin Moynihan, “A Fine Day for Music, No Matter Your Taste”, New York Times:
      The musicians were an octet of third graders from nearby Public School 180, who skillfully tapped out marimba tunes from Zimbabwe and balafon music from Guinea.
      add
  3. cel *
    • 2008 June 22, Michael Hirschorn, “Success Story 2”, New York Times:
      After Jobs’s $5 million offer was rejected, the team attempted to do a deal with Disney , then a bastion of hand-painted cel animation.
      add
  4. cels
    • 2008 June 22, Michael Hirschorn, “Success Story 2”, New York Times:
      Thus the dying-out of Disney’s august cel-animation houses, in which thousands of artisans hand-painted individual cels — like monks lovingly crushing grapes in the higher Dordogne — now seems predestined.
      add
  5. countertradition
    • 2008 June 22, Jacob Heilbrunn, “‘Not My Fault’”, New York Times:
      One answer lies in a less well-known but equally important countertradition, the dyslogistic school of memoir written by former officials who present themselves as disillusioned innocents.
      add
  6. cybercentric
    • 2008 June 22, “Fighting a War Against Distraction”, New York Times:
      No. The P.D.A., the cellphone and the computer did not usher in our hypermobile, split-focus, cybercentric culture.
      add
  7. esplanaded
    • 2008 June 22, Christopher Gray, “Brooklyn’s Stately Esplanade”, New York Times:
      GRANDEST of all the streets in Prospect Park South is Albemarle Road, a broad, esplanaded boulevard of stately neo-Classical, Queen Anne and Colonial style mansions.
      add
  8. favorables *
    • 2008 June 22, Maureen Dowd, “The Carla Effect”, New York Times:
      In a recent survey in Le Figaro, the French president was back up at 37 to 41 percent favorables from a low of 32 percent last month.
      add
  9. gerberas *
    • 2008 June 22, Armand Limnander, “The Avant Gardener”, New York Times:
      Recently the art and fashion worlds have also become acquainted with the 53-year-old floral designer: he created the arrangements for the opening of the Palazzo Grassi museum in Venice two years ago and erected a wall of pink dahlias, gerberas, hydrangeas and lisianthuses as the backdrop to Dries Van Noten ’s spring 2007 collection.
      add
  10. godfathered
    • 2008 June 22, Clive Thompson, “A Green Coal Baron?”, New York Times:
      This should be a golden moment for Rogers: he has godfathered a bill that could significantly reshape the electricity industry, help balance the world’s climate and establish his legacy as a visionary C.E.O. — a “statesman,” as he puts it.
      add
  11. hackable
    • 2008 June 22, Rob Walker, “Tinkerer’s Toy”, New York Times:
      The Chumby is Internet-connected, runs on Linux software and is extremely hackable.
      add
  12. hypermobile
    • 2008 June 22, “Fighting a War Against Distraction”, New York Times:
      No. The P.D.A., the cellphone and the computer did not usher in our hypermobile, split-focus, cybercentric culture.
      add
  13. kiddingly
  14. leukotomies
    • 2008 June 22, Leah Hager Cohen, “That Summer in Maine”, New York Times:
      Julia’s father, early on, is almost comical in his grouchiness (there’s a priceless recurring bit in the opening pages about a misplaced atlas), but we eventually learn that he is plagued by memories of the leukotomies he performed in V.A. hospitals decades earlier, and that the prospect of losing his wife to Alzheimer’s has awakened in him surprising stores of shame and empathy.
      add
  15. lipless
  16. lisianthuses
    • 2008 June 22, Armand Limnander, “The Avant Gardener”, New York Times:
      Recently the art and fashion worlds have also become acquainted with the 53-year-old floral designer: he created the arrangements for the opening of the Palazzo Grassi museum in Venice two years ago and erected a wall of pink dahlias, gerberas, hydrangeas and lisianthuses as the backdrop to Dries Van Noten ’s spring 2007 collection.
      add
  17. lobsterwoman
    • 2008 June 22, Jennifer Finney Boylan, “A Political Shell Game”, New York Times:
      The author (and lobsterwoman) Linda Greenlaw, about to depart on a book tour for her new mystery, admitted to me that Mr. Obama’s emergence as the Democratic nominee was a historic, awe-inspiring moment — not that she’s going to vote for him.
      add
  18. megaverdicts
    • 2008 June 22, Jonathan D. Glater, “To the Trenches: The Tort War Is Raging On”, New York Times:
      The Chamber of Commerce says the number of megaverdicts for more than $100 million dropped to 2 last year, from 27 in 2000.
      add
  19. minicity
    • 2008 June 22, Robin Pogrebin, “I’m the Designer. My Client’s the Autocrat.”, New York Times:
      One lightning rod in the debate is Rem Koolhaas ’s mammoth headquarters for China’s state broadcast authority, CCTV, a minicity in itself in a capital where cranes dot the skylines and nearly every famous foreign architect has a project on the boards. Mr. Koolhaas suggested at the outset of the project, which he was assigned in 2002, that by the time his tower — a hulking hollowed-out trapezoid — was completed, China’s censorship of the airwaves might well have changed.
      add
  20. monovisioned
    • 2008 June 22, Allen Salkin, “It’s Not About the Bike”, New York Times:
      “As a friend of his, that was the most grim, boring, monovisioned part of him,” she said.
      add
  21. neuroliberalism
    • 2008 June 22, William Saletan, “Neuro-Liberalism”, New York Times:
      In place of neoliberalism, he offers neuroliberalism.
      add
  22. nonfuel
    • 2008 June 22, Ben Stein, “Can the Fed Answer All the Alarms?”, New York Times:
      Some consumers would slow down their nonfuel purchases, and the economy would sputter and cough.
      add
  23. nonwork
    • 2008 June 22, Andrea Neighbours, “How My Husband Won Back My Vote”, New York Times:
      His work obsession was so notorious that our friends made sport of snapping pictures of him glued to his phone at the few nonwork events he attended, like the New Orleans Jazz Fest.
      add
  24. nox *
    • 2008 June 22, Clive Thompson, “A Green Coal Baron?”, New York Times:
      Through legislation, the government first set a limit, or cap, on how much sox and nox could be discharged by the nation’s coal-burning utilities.
      add
  25. outgrossed
    • 2008 June 22, Michael Hirschorn, “Success Story 2”, New York Times:
      (It later outgrossed “Toy Story” itself.)
      add
  26. polyradiculoneuropathy
    • 2008 June 22, Emily Mitchell, “Sick Days”, New York Times:
      Chronic Idiopathic demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, like Guillain-Barré syndrome, which it resembles, is a neurological disease, not a blood disease.
      add
  27. preponderating
    • 2008 June 22, Sam Tanenhaus, “When Reining In an Imperial President Was the Conservatives’ Cause”, New York Times:
      In his book “Congress and the American Tradition,” the conservative thinker James Burnham argued that the Founders had envisioned a government in which “the preponderating share of power was held and exercised by the legislature,” primarily the House, since its members were directly accountable to their local constituents, unlike presidents, who wielded power through Caesarist manipulations of “the mob.”
      add
  28. pseudocelebrities
    • 2008 June 22, Julie Creswell, “Nothing Sells Like Celebrity”, New York Times:
      Companies, trying to align themselves ever closer to A-list stars (as well as B-listers, C-listers and reality TV pseudocelebrities) and their quicksilver fame are constantly seeking new ways to merge the already-blurry lines between the commercial and entertainment worlds.
      add
  29. pungwe
    • 2008 June 22, Barry Bearak, “Assassins in Zimbabwe Aim at the Grass Roots”, New York Times:
      So-called pungwe sessions, the Shona word for all-night vigils, have become common in areas where people once loyal to President Mugabe dared vote against him in the first round of voting on March 29.
      add
  30. readworthy
    • 2008 June 22, William Safire, “Presents of Mind”, New York Times:
      A trio of readworthy recommendations:
      add
  31. revampers
    • 2008 June 22, Conrad De Aenlle, “For Overseas Shares, the Sure Bet Is Over”, New York Times:
      She conceded that many people view the two, as well as many foreign companies, as serial revampers, continually overhauling their activities but never quite getting the job done.
      add
  32. semibuoyant
    • 2008 June 22, Donovan Hohn, “Sea of Trash”, New York Times:
      Comb the Manhattan waterfront and you will find, along with the usual windrows of cups, bottles and plastic bags, what the E.P.A. calls “floatables,” those “visible buoyant or semibuoyant solids” that people flush into the waste stream like cotton swabs, condoms, tampon applicators and dental floss.
      add
  33. shardlike
    • 2008 June 22, Claudia La Rocco, “Learning to Dance, Even to His Own Beat”, New York Times:
      The shardlike, often violent outbursts of music are met by Mr. Magloire’s minimalist, spooky choreography, in which the dancers seem to creep and pick their way through the dangerous aural landscape.
      add
  34. shareowners
    • 2008 June 22, Gretchen Morgenson, “How Big a Payday for the Pay Consultants?”, New York Times:
      “Such disclosures will allow shareowners to determine whether the board’s consultants are sufficiently independent from senior management with regard to executive compensation advice,” wrote Kurt Schacht, managing director at the center, in a late December letter to the S.E.C.
      add
  35. somniferously
    • 2008 June 22, Donovan Hohn, “Sea of Trash”, New York Times:
      The Encyclopedia of Coastal Processes, about as somniferously clinical a scientific source on the subject as one can find, predicts that plastic pollution “will incrementally increase through the 21st century,” because “the problems created are chronic and potentially global, rather than acute and local or regional as many would contemplate.”
      add
  36. tankless
    • 2008 June 22, Felicity Barringer, “The New Trophy Home, Small and Ecological”, New York Times:
      Today, dinner-party bragging rights are likely to include: “Let me tell you about my tankless hot water heater.”
      add
  37. transmen
  38. twentyfold
  39. ultramasculinity
    • 2008 June 22, Alexis Soloski, “Firing Back at Gay Bashers, Bawdily”, New York Times:
      “It was a way to turn hip-hop on its head,” Mr. Craddock said, “because of the ultramasculinity of it, but also to take it back to its roots, to back when hip-hop was a tool of social justice, speaking out against poverty and oppression.”
      add
  40. uncataloged
  41. untunable
    • 2008 June 22, Joel Brouwer, “Counting the Dead”, New York Times:
      Wright was born and raised in Arkansas, and her first poems were written in what she herself called “idiom Ozarkia”: hard-luck narratives “accompanied by untunable git-tars and ocarinas.”
      add
  42. veepstakes *
    • 2008 June 22, Mark Leibovich, “The Great American Float”, New York Times:
      Mr. Todd, whose ubiquity as a running-mate handicapper at his network is akin to Mel Kiper Jr.’s as an N.F.L. draft expert on ESPN, said that all the time and energy devoted to the veepstakes these days is well spent.
      add
  43. wereleopard
    • 2008 June 22, Dwight Garner, “Inside the List”, New York Times:
      A) “One of them was a wereleopard; the other was a werewolf; both of them were strippers.”
      add

Sequestered[edit]

  1. beanbagish
    • 2008 June 22, Rob Walker, “Tinkerer’s Toy”, New York Times:
      (Maybe it’s the beanbagish exterior, but something about the object suggests that there’s a garage sale in its future.)
      add
  2. bombshellette
    • 2008 June 22, Julie Creswell, “Nothing Sells Like Celebrity”, New York Times:
      Eva Longoria , the bombshellette star of “Desperate Housewives,” sells L’Oréal Paris hair color.
      add