User:Visviva/NYT 20090923

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words, lacking English entries in the English Wiktionary as of the most recent database dump, found in the 2009-09-23 issue of the New York Times (2009-09-23).

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85704 tokens ‧ 26 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 26 types ‧ 26 (~ 100%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-09-23[edit]

  1. baklawah
    • Template:start year}2009, Anna Louie Sussman, “Yes, We Speak Cupcake”[1], New York Times:
      AS a young student at the multinational Aramco school in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, Fadi Jaber, a son of Palestinian refugees, always preferred his American classmates’ cupcakes, brownies and chocolate chip cookies to his mother’s pastries: knafah, qatayef and baklawah.
      add
  2. dduk
    • Template:start year}2009, “Tteokbokki — Korean Rice Cakes with Red Chili Sauce”[2], New York Times:
      Note : Tteok (Korean rice cakes, also spelled dduk or toppoki) are available in Asian markets.
      add
  3. frappato
    • Template:start year}2009, Eric Asimov, “From Jura, Geeky but Versatile Wines”[3], New York Times:
      It, too, can have an earthy, gamy flavor, yet it is deliciously refreshing, almost like a cross between gamay, the grape of Beaujolais, and frappato, a lively, refreshing Sicilian grape.
      add
  4. gamay *
    • Template:start year}2009, Eric Asimov, “From Jura, Geeky but Versatile Wines”[4], New York Times:
      It, too, can have an earthy, gamy flavor, yet it is deliciously refreshing, almost like a cross between gamay, the grape of Beaujolais, and frappato, a lively, refreshing Sicilian grape.
      add
  5. gatoring
    • Template:start year}2009, Maureen Dowd, “Where the Wild Thing Is”[5], New York Times:
      No gatoring on campus, though.
      add
  6. knafah
    • Template:start year}2009, Anna Louie Sussman, “Yes, We Speak Cupcake”[6], New York Times:
      AS a young student at the multinational Aramco school in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, Fadi Jaber, a son of Palestinian refugees, always preferred his American classmates’ cupcakes, brownies and chocolate chip cookies to his mother’s pastries: knafah, qatayef and baklawah.
      add
  7. ploussard
    • Template:start year}2009, Eric Asimov, “From Jura, Geeky but Versatile Wines”[7], New York Times:
      I think my favorite of all Jura reds, though, is Jacques Puffeney’s Arbois Vieilles Vignes, a blend of pinot noir, trousseau and ploussard that is the epitome of Arbois terroir, inspiring and invigorating.
      add
  8. postcommute
  9. poulsard
    • Template:start year}2009, Eric Asimov, “From Jura, Geeky but Versatile Wines”[8], New York Times:
      The other major red grape, the poulsard, sometimes known as ploussard, is uncommonly delicate, and so pale it looks more like a dark rosé than a red.
      add
  10. qatayef
    • Template:start year}2009, Anna Louie Sussman, “Yes, We Speak Cupcake”[9], New York Times:
      AS a young student at the multinational Aramco school in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, Fadi Jaber, a son of Palestinian refugees, always preferred his American classmates’ cupcakes, brownies and chocolate chip cookies to his mother’s pastries: knafah, qatayef and baklawah.
      add
  11. savagnin
    • Template:start year}2009, Eric Asimov, “From Jura, Geeky but Versatile Wines”[10], New York Times:
      Oxygen is an accomplice, not a foe, in the production of vin jaune, which is made of the savagnin grape, a Jura staple.
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  12. savagnins
    • Template:start year}2009, Eric Asimov, “From Jura, Geeky but Versatile Wines”[11], New York Times:
      But some savagnins, made in the style of a vin jaune but with less aging, are almost as remarkable.
      add
  13. toppoki
    • Template:start year}2009, “Tteokbokki — Korean Rice Cakes with Red Chili Sauce”[12], New York Times:
      Note : Tteok (Korean rice cakes, also spelled dduk or toppoki) are available in Asian markets.
      add
  14. tteokbokki
    • Template:start year}2009, Julia Moskin, “Culinary Diplomacy With a Side of Kimchi”[13], New York Times:
      At the Momofuku restaurants, David Chang made his name by layering the intense flavors of Korea into Japanese and American dishes; at Ssam Bar, his version of tteokbokki is crossbred with Italian gnocchi in a light, fiery, herb-spiked pork sauce.
      add

Sequestered[edit]