User:Visviva/Reader 19880219

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words, lacking English entries in the English Wiktionary as of the most recent database dump, found in the 1988-02-19 issue of the Chicago Reader (2009-01-16).

[ see all Reader pages ] - [ see all tracking lists ]

36642 tokens ‧ 27519 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 5351 types ‧ 62 (~ 1.159%) words before cleaning ‧ 

1988-02-19[edit]

  1. antichoice
  2. bohemia
    • Template:start year}1988, Peter Friederici, “On Exhibit: Nan Goldin's love junkies”[2], Chicago Reader:
      In between is an exhaustive survey of the world Goldin knows best: a modern urban bohemia, whether in West Berlin, London, or New York's East Village, of bars and nightclubs, of drinking and getting high.
      add
  3. chordings
    • Template:start year}1988, Chris Morris, “Marianne Faithful--Strange Weather”[3], Chicago Reader:
      Guitarist Bill Frisell is present on most of the tracks; a specialist in unusual, sonorous chordings and thick harmonics, he is ideal for the creation of dense atmospheres.
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  4. cloudlike
    • Template:start year}1988, David Wasserman, “Lace Panties”[4], Chicago Reader:
      Inside her chamber, the cushiony touch of her carpeted floor was cloudlike.
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  5. clunkiness
    • Template:start year}1988, Anthony Adler, “Malignancy Plays”[5], Chicago Reader:
      Steve Sherwin's Chris develops a depth that grows unexpectedly out of an initial clunkiness.
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  6. cochair
    • Template:start year}1988, Ben Joravsky, “A referendum gorws in the 47th Ward: boosting the current against Com Ed rate hikes”[6], Chicago Reader:
      "On the referendum, people are asked to vote yes or no," says Hoyt, who is cochair of the Coalition for Lower Electric Rates, the ad hoc organization that collected the signatures needed to put the referendum on the ballot.
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  7. daruma
    • Template:start year}1988, Janice Perrone, “A Gloom of Their Own”[7], Chicago Reader:
      Like a daruma doll, you knock it over and it rights itself.
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  8. divertissements
    • Template:start year}1988, Cerinda Survant, “Balletic Harmony”[8], Chicago Reader:
      The same daring and individuality animate John Gardner's Blue Bird and Alessandra Ferri's Princess Florine in the Act III divertissements as well.
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  9. emotively
    • Template:start year}1988, Chris Morris, “Marianne Faithful--Strange Weather”[9], Chicago Reader:
      It would have been easy for her work on these difficult songs to topple over the line into self-pity and bathos, but her restrained, beautifully tempered work always remains direct, emotively honest, and free of stylized handwringing.
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  10. extramusical
    • Template:start year}1988, Chris Morris, “Marianne Faithful--Strange Weather”[10], Chicago Reader:
      Dietrich and Lenya lacked a number of singerly virtues, but their strengths lay in a kind of extramusical quality of feeling and experience.
      add
  11. faves
    • Template:start year}1988, Achy Obejas, “Calendar”[11], Chicago Reader:
      Find your true depth tonight at the Lizard Lounge Limbo Party, where the sounds of Mighty Sparrow, Calypso Rose, Tito Puente, and other Caribbean faves will bring you to your knees.
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  12. funkmaster
    • Template:start year}1988, Renaldo Migaldi, “Wallets”[12], Chicago Reader:
      Some of us have been waiting a long time to hear them live, forced to fill the gap with endless spins of their Twin-Tone debut, Take It (produced, oddly enough, by New Orleans funkmaster Allen Toussaint), one of the most intriguing LPs of 1986.
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  13. handwringing
    • Template:start year}1988, Chris Morris, “Marianne Faithful--Strange Weather”[13], Chicago Reader:
      It would have been easy for her work on these difficult songs to topple over the line into self-pity and bathos, but her restrained, beautifully tempered work always remains direct, emotively honest, and free of stylized handwringing.
      add
  14. jetes
    • Template:start year}1988, Dorothy Samachson, “American Ballet Theatre”[14], Chicago Reader:
      It starts with the basic five positions, cutely presented by five local youngsters, and proceeds to work by the corps: flashy tours en l'air, jetes, barrel turns, and other breathtakingly difficult steps and big jumps.
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  15. multiflora
    • Template:start year}1988, Harold Henderson, “City File”[15], Chicago Reader:
      Japanese honeysuckle, multiflora rose, and purple loosestrife are now officially banned from the state of Illinois: buying, selling, or planting them can net you $500 or six months or both.
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  16. multipattern
    • Template:start year}1988, Cerinda Survant, “Balletic Harmony”[16], Chicago Reader:
      With outrageous multicolor, multipattern costumes by Christian Lacroix and rich, rosy art nouveau scenery by Zack Brown, ABT's production has none of the grotesque reverence that so often mars revivals and new productions of important works.
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  17. nonexpression
    • Template:start year}1988, Achy Obejas, “Choose Me”[17], Chicago Reader:
      Byrne's hair was stylish and cropped short, three strands of pearls curled over her chest, and her nonexpression remained fixed.
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  18. overseasoned
    • Template:start year}1988, Joel E. Siegel, “Heartfelt Fluff”[18], Chicago Reader:
      He also manages to extract refined performances from overseasoned prosciutti like Aiello, Vincent Gardenia, and Julie Bovasso.
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  19. poignance
    • Template:start year}1988, Dorothy Samachson, “American Ballet Theatre”[19], Chicago Reader:
      Its poignance, searing exploration of sexual frustration and guilt, insight into the human spirit, and ultimate transcendence over despair retain their force, despite the 40-odd years since it was conceived.
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  20. posthospitalization
    • Template:start year}1988, Janice Perrone, “A Gloom of Their Own”[20], Chicago Reader:
      Most all-female units are halfway houses, where women are sent posthospitalization.
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  21. postshow
    • Template:start year}1988, Peter Friederici, “On Exhibit: Nan Goldin's love junkies”[21], Chicago Reader:
      The postshow discussion reveals that reactions tend to be mixed: some viewers see her photos as merely a sort of pre-AIDS sexual geography of a certain punkish set of people; others feel personally addressed.
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  22. posttrial
    • Template:start year}1988, Grant Pick, “Doing Part-Time”[22], Chicago Reader:
      So while Carbonaro drafted a posttrial motion arguing technical reasons to reduce Waitkus's conviction from a Class X felony to something that didn't mandate prison, NCIA worked up Waitkus's client plan.
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  23. presentencing
    • Template:start year}1988, Grant Pick, “Doing Part-Time”[23], Chicago Reader:
      This workup will dwarf the presentencing report of the overloaded county probation departments (in Cook County these reports normally run six to eight pages).
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  24. prosciutti
    • Template:start year}1988, Joel E. Siegel, “Heartfelt Fluff”[24], Chicago Reader:
      He also manages to extract refined performances from overseasoned prosciutti like Aiello, Vincent Gardenia, and Julie Bovasso.
      add
  25. punkish
    • Template:start year}1988, Peter Friederici, “On Exhibit: Nan Goldin's love junkies”[25], Chicago Reader:
      The postshow discussion reveals that reactions tend to be mixed: some viewers see her photos as merely a sort of pre-AIDS sexual geography of a certain punkish set of people; others feel personally addressed.
      add
  26. reediting
    • Template:start year}1988, Peter Friederici, “On Exhibit: Nan Goldin's love junkies”[26], Chicago Reader:
      She has continually refined the show since, adding slides, reediting them, and changing the sound track.
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  27. relevancies
    • Template:start year}1988, Albert Williams, “Stage Notes: A Czech play's dramatic prescience”[27], Chicago Reader:
      You can't escape the relevancies .
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  28. resprout
    • Template:start year}1988, Jerry Sullivan, “Field & Street”[28], Chicago Reader:
      Burned hardwoods can resprout from their roots.
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  29. scumsucker
    • Template:start year}1988, Michael Miner, “Nitwits and Nabobs/Absolute Sovereignty/Poison Pen”[29], Chicago Reader:
      "Bonehead" isn't our favorite word ("scumsucker" is jauntier) and putting lights in Wrigley Field isn't a cause we have much sympathy for.
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  30. shantylike
    • Template:start year}1988, Chris Morris, “Marianne Faithful--Strange Weather”[30], Chicago Reader:
      Equally affecting is the title cut, which contains the shantylike rhythms of many of Tom Waits's more recent compositions.
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  31. shortgrass
    • Template:start year}1988, Jerry Sullivan, “Field & Street”[31], Chicago Reader:
      In the west, a lethal combination of overgrazing and fire suppression turned millions of acres of once-productive shortgrass prairie into mesquite thickets.
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  32. singerly
    • Template:start year}1988, Chris Morris, “Marianne Faithful--Strange Weather”[32], Chicago Reader:
      Dietrich and Lenya lacked a number of singerly virtues, but their strengths lay in a kind of extramusical quality of feeling and experience.
      add
  33. smartmouth
    • Template:start year}1988, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”[33], Chicago Reader:
      Other 19th-century proposals for he/she, his/her, him/her include ne, nis, nim; hi, hes, hem; e, es, em; ir, iro, im; and ip, ips (no, smartmouth, the objective isn't ooray).
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  34. stylization
    • Template:start year}1988, Albert Williams, “110 in the Shade”[34], Chicago Reader:
      By dumping the chorus numbers and focusing more intensely on the lead roles, and by making the work more accessible to small theater companies, the authors have also put more responsibility on the director, designers, and actors to create a performance that captures 110's shimmering blend of naturalism and stylization.
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  35. swivet
    • Template:start year}1988, Michael Miner, “Nitwits and Nabobs/Absolute Sovereignty/Poison Pen”[35], Chicago Reader:
      No sir, some things may get us into a swivet but the Tribune's recent "bonehead" editorial isn't one of them.
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  36. undereducated
    • Template:start year}1988, Janice Perrone, “A Gloom of Their Own”[36], Chicago Reader:
      They usually enter adult life undereducated and underprepared.
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  37. unenthusiastically
    • Template:start year}1988, Joel E. Siegel, “Heartfelt Fluff”[37], Chicago Reader:
      She unenthusiastically agrees to marry Johnny (Danny Aiello), an uninspiring, devoted mama's boy who proposes to her before leaving for Sicily to be at the bedside of his dying mother.
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  38. unstyled
    • Template:start year}1988, Joel E. Siegel, “Heartfelt Fluff”[38], Chicago Reader:
      For the film's first half, she's supposed to be dowdy--drab clothes; unstyled, gray-streaked hair.
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  39. warmhearted
    • Template:start year}1988, Lawrence Bommer, “The Radio Play”[39], Chicago Reader:
      This new play by Gunnar Branson and Marc Silvia has a lot going for it--a warmhearted and detailed script about a 1940 radio broadcast (much like The 1940's Radio Hour), a sharp and energetic ten-member cast, and the right screwball pacing to make it work.
      add

Sequestered[edit]