WYSIWYG

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See also: Wysiwyg

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Coined by John Seybold and popularized at Xerox PARC during the late 1970s.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈwɪz.iˌwɪɡ/, /ˈwɪz.ə.wɪɡ/
  • (file)

Phrase[edit]

WYSIWYG

  1. Acronym of what you see is what you get.

Noun[edit]

WYSIWYG (plural WYSIWYGs)

  1. (computing) Software that allows editing on screen what the printed version would be like; software with a what-you-see-is-what-you-get display interface.
    • 2003, James H. Pence, How to Do Everything with HTML & XHTML, page 132:
      WYSIWYGs are helpful tools in that they enable you to create pages much more quickly

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ John Markoff (2004-03-16) , “John W. Seybold, 88, Innovator in Printing”, in The New York Times[1], ISSN 0362-4331: “It was Mr. Seybold, according to his son Andrew, who first used what you see is what you get in reference to computerized word processing, after watching The Flip Wilson Show on which Mr. Wilson used the phrase to describe his female character Geraldine.”